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I got a surprise in today's mail...

 

Encyclopedia of United States silver & gold commemorative coins 1892-1954

 

Ooh thank you so much :ninja: and for the photo books too! You are awesome!

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I won this item from eBay today!

 

Coins of LIVONIAN Order XIII-XVI ct. by Gunnar Haljak, Tallinn 1997

 

"Hal" is the catalog of coins minted in Arensburg, Dorpat, Hapsal, Reval, Riga and Wenden by Bishops, Free Cities and Danish Kingdom from 1219 to 1569. 104 pages. The catalog printed on German and Estonian languages. Print drawing is only 300 copies! Hard cover.

Livlandische.Munzen_Haljak.1997.1.jpg

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I just found that Bidpay was not yet in operation! The seller from Estonia even do not accept Paypal. It requires declare form for mail to Estonia, in other words, I can not drop the letter into collection box directly. But there are too many people in the post office at all time :ninja:

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've picked up a few token books in the last few weeks, Latin American Tokens by Russell Rulau, Tokens of Mexico by Frank Grove, and a signed and numbered copy of A Guide to Colorado Merchant Trade Tokens by Stuart Pritchard. Standard fair to expand my library in support of my aluminum collection (and just because I like numismatic books).

 

But the best find was Thai Coins by Mark Graham and Manfred Winkler, 1992, Finance One Limited, Bangkok, Thailand. It is a beautifully illustrated survey of the history of Thai coins published in Thai and English. The coins and various monetary forms used through time are all illustrated with the best examples from private collections, many of them extremely rare and not commonly encountered by Western collectors. Although I do not collect Thai coins, I could not pass this beautiful volume that I encountered in our local used bookstore.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

gallery_589_153_5419.jpg

 

My latest purchase arrived today. From the seller's description:

 

Heiss, Aloïs. Description générale des monnaies antiques de l'Espagne. Paris, L'Imprimerie Nationale, 1870. 548 pp., 68 ppl. of line drawings. Quarterbound cloth with marbled boards. Fine, spine a bit faded. No to very minimal foxing.

 

An early standard work on Celtiberian and Romano-Spanish coinages, still often cited. Employs thick paper with large margins and specially designed Iberian/Phoenician fonts, includes valuations in Francs, and the line drawings are nothing less than superb.

 

It was described as massive (9.5" by 12.5", 3" thick), about 10 pounds. The paper feels wonderful and the type has an amazing raised texture. The custom fonts are nothing short of superb and the illustrations are spectacular. I never seize to be amazed by the quality of the line drawings from the 1800s.

 

An added bonus, not in the dealer's description, is the bookplate of the eminent numismatist, Doct. Pierre Bastien. A note in E-sylum describes the bookplate as: appropriately, in the form of a coin, the obverse bearing the image of a woman (Cleopatra?) feeding a snake, the reverse with comic and tragic masks, a scroll and a pen upon a manuscript. Bastien wrote French catalogs of the Roman coins of Lugdunum (among other books). While I do not yet own any of his books (they are on my library want list), I now own a spectacular book from his personal library. I love these personal ties to the numismatic community.

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  • 4 weeks later...

6a1b12bb9da0104557e4c010._AA240_.L.jpg

 

Roger Burdette's Renaissance of American Coinage: 1905-1908 arrived today, the second of three planned volumes. The third volume appeared first, this is the first volume published second, the second volume comes next year. 1905 to 1908 covers the Augustus Saint-Gaudens designs and a briefer discussion of the Pratt designs. Burdette's work is fresh and provides new insights to our coinage and the politics behind their design and production.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Heiss, Aloïs. Description générale des monnaies antiques de l'Espagne. Paris, L'Imprimerie Nationale, 1870. 548 pp., 68 ppl. of line drawings. Quarterbound cloth with marbled boards. Fine, spine a bit faded. No to very minimal foxing.

 

Like you, I am always impressed by the workmanship evidenced in these old books. Even newspapers of the time required armies of skilled laborers whose efforts are missed today. I think of compositors, proofreaders, copyboys, editors... and they turned out several editions each day, continuously updating the paper.

 

With books, we think nothing today of illustrations, and photoengraving certainly made a difference. But before that, they still illiustrated books, cutting plates by hand. (Paul Revere's engraving publicized the Boston Massacre the next day. You can't get a snapshot of the company picnic through Photoshop in that time. Of course, Paul Revere did not need a departmental kick-off meeting to start a project.)

 

My latest purchases:

Fischer's Ding and Schjo"th, both from Frank Robinson.

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I just picked up some old books myself. Original editions of Roman Imperial Coins Vol.I and Vol.II as well as History of Jewish coins, printed in Leipzig in 1862. To round out my lof there's a more modern book, Grierson's Coins of Medieval Europe. I got this from the ANA library and had trouble shippig it back. For $80 it's an awesome book about that time period.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Went on a brief buying spree the past couple of weeks and everything (almost) arrived yesterday.

 

Breen's Encyclopedia was the most routine. Didn't have it, do now.

 

The others are more interesting.

 

From George Kolbe:

 

Antiquarian Books on Coins and Medals from the Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century, by Ferdinando Bassoli (2001)

 

Ancient Numismatics and Its History Including a Critical Review of the Literature, by Ernest Babelon (2004)

 

These are the first two books in his Studies in the History of Numismatic Literature series. As I have acquired older volumes for my specialized collecting topis, I've become more interested in the older books. These are two studies to help refine my library.

 

The third Kolbe purchase is:

 

Illustrium Imagines Incorporating an English Translation of Nota by Roberto Weiss (2001)

 

Illustrium Imagines was the first illustrated numismatic book by Andrea Fulvio published in 1517. Kolbe purchased an unbound and incomplete copy of this rare, early volume. He used the occasion to create a limited edition, fine press book limited to 151 copies and 17 leather bound special edition copies. Mine is number 136 of the 151. Each copie includes a leaf from the original Illustrium Imagines featuring an illustration of Constantinus III with brief bio and Eraclius.

 

The pages look like:

 

classicaltrad1-29.jpg

 

I also have John Cunnally's Illustrious Images on the way. It is an introduction and a guide to the numismatic scholarship of the Renaissance--the coin collections and illustrated coin-books produced by humanists and artists of the sixteenth century.

 

The last book is Les Jetons de L'Échevinage Parisien, by A. D'Affry de la Monnoye (1878, Paris).

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  • 3 weeks later...

These came today, thanks in large part to help from T_3:

 

Money through the Centuries and Money of the Kingdom. I've already found answers to some questions, and that's while reading with a Dutch-English dictionary clutched in one hand.

 

 

geldbook1_00012.jpggeldbook11.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

Every year I order 10 to 15 Red Books for Christmas presents. I usually get the cheapest version though for others. I use a ringed edition for the basement and same for my computer room. I have all Red Book Editions from 8 to present in Hard Cover and never opened in my library.

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I recived my signed edition of “The Bronze Coinage of Great Britain” by Michael Freeman November 2006 reprint.

This is a great reference book that covers all the British bronze type coins from 1860 - 1970. Pennies, halfpennies and farthings. It covers varieties of the currency issues as well as every type of pattern, proof and trial strikings of each denomination.

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A Finnish language book, loosely translated as "Researches, Collectors and Donors: Finnish Numismatists 1700-1917" by Tuukka Talvio. An interesting book dealing with the more significant and influential numismatists. Part biographical, it also deals with their collections, coins, and where some of those have been donated. The cover has a great portrait of one of the numismatists, Antell, painted by the Finnish painter Gallen-Kallela.

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Last 3 books I have bought:

 

LA MONNAIE ET LE PORTRAIT ROYAL: Brussels 1991. Issued by National Bank of Belgium. Book about painters and sculptors who have designed royal portraits on coins and banknotes of Belgium. Some interesting facts, but not very useful for numismatists. But I believe it's worth E 5.- I've paid for it. Available in French and Flamish.

 

О ЧЕМ РАССКАЗЫВАЮТ МОНЕТЫ: Minsk 1977. Despite on infantil title of the book ("What are coins telling?"), the book is perfect! It contains all the history of money in the territory of Belarus avoiding just coinage of Poland 1923-39. Probably all best numismatic books I have read are in Russian but catalogs. This is the area they have to work yet!

Book has been bought at local antiquity shop for Ls 0.15 (US$ 0.27).

 

MONEDAS Y BILLETES ESPAÑOLES 1833-2004 Y DE LA UNION EUROPEA: Barcelona 2005. Catalog type book, probably one of the best national catalogs I have seen. Since it was out of date (there's edition 2006 available) I've got it for E 5.-

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I've been exploring two themes recently:

 

First the early days of collecting and the role of coins in illustrating history. Two books to explore the topic "hands on."

 

Series Augustorum, Augustorum, Caesarum, Et Tyrannorum Omnium, Tam in Oriente, Quam in Occidente, A C.J. Caesare by Laurentius Patarol, published in 1722 in Venice. Roman coin obverses are used to illustrate the emporers.

 

La Science des Medailles, Nouvelle Edition, Avec Des Remarques Historiques & Critiques, Tome Premier by Louis Jobert, published in 1739 in Paris (Fourth edition). The opening illustration of two collectors before their coin cabinet:

 

med_gallery_589_153_33863.jpg

 

Second are early American medals (US and Canada):

 

American colonial history illustrated by contemporary medals by C. Wyllys Betts, published by Scott Stamp and Coin Company, New York, 1894.

 

Illustrated History of the Coins and Tokens of Canada by P.N. Breton, printed by the British North American Banknote Company (1894)

 

The Medallic Work of John Adams Bolen by Neil E. Musante, Springfield, Mass (2002)

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  • 3 weeks later...

KLEINER DEUTSCHER MUENZKATALOG von 1871 bis heute. G.Schoen/G Schoen : Munich 2006. (Smaller German catalog of coins from 1871 till now) Exactly so! Not "coins of Germany" but "German coins". It means this book also contains coins of Austria (but not the coins of Hungarian part af Austrohungaria), Liechtenstein, Danzig and Switzerland.

This catalog is much harder to use comparing to KM because coins are presented in chronological order. Some coins have prices just for one grade. On the other hand prices are more correct (where's KM weak point). Varieties mostly are shown not just mentioned. Price: EUR 12.80

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KLEINER DEUTSCHER MUENZKATALOG von 1871 bis heute. G.Schoen/G Schoen : Munich 2006. (Smaller German catalog of coins from 1871 till now)

In this case "kleiner" simply means "small". The term is a little misleading since even this small catalog has almost 600 pages :ninja: As for the order in which the coins appear, well, the Jaeger (the "Bible" for post-1871 German coins) does the same thing. Makes it easier to see which coins are part of a certain series - but sure, if you want to look a piece up, the order by denomination makes more sense.

 

Fortunately the Schön catalogs have the Jaeger numbers (for German coins) and the KM numbers (for other coins) too. What is also nice, by the way, is that Gerhard Schön is an active member of some German coin forums.

 

Christian

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I've picked up a couple recently ...

 

"Early Half Dollar Die Varieties 1794 - 1836", Third Edition, First Printing by Al Overton. It's the "bible" for U.S. Bust Half Dollar variety collectors. Thanks Jorg !!! :ninja: I hope to get started on some coin acquisitions soon.

 

... and ...

 

"Early American Coppers Anthology" - an anthology of "the finest research in the field of United States Large Cents and Half Cents" - 1977 Edition (only 1000 copies made) - It contains published works by such early copper greats as Crosby, Frossard, Gilbert and Newcomb.

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