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Dave
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I finally got a shipment of banknotes I had been expecting for about three weeks today. I had emailed the respected seller who is in Asia (Thailand), and he replied that the package was sent Registered mail. Yesterday the postman left the calling card for me to get the package from the post office today. When I got it, it was taped up in green tape on one end. The tape had printing on it and read "Inspected by US Customs and Border Patrol".

 

Needless to say, I was a bit worried.

 

I opened the package gingerly, trying not to rip open anything inside. I found that the envelope was cut open and that the paper taped to and surrounding the banknotes was ripped open. The seller had placed my three notes in a clear plastic sleeve and taped that to a very sturdy plastic sheet with corrugated middle, so nothing had been warped or bent. one note was visible through the plastic, and you could see that there was more, but could not tell what they were. Thankfully, the notes were not removed for a more detailed inspection.

 

This is the first time this has happened to me. I really don't know what to think about it. I don't feel that there was 'really' anything bad about it, but I wonder what they thought they were getting into.

 

My wife told me that she has heard of this happening lately with some friends she corresponds with and sends cards back and forth to. She gets a lot more mail from more exotic places than I do, and I haven't seen her mail opened up (Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, just last week), but she told me that there have been people who have sent cards from Canada and have had them 'inspected' recently.

 

Has anyone else had this happen lately?

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I finally got a shipment of banknotes I had been expecting for about three weeks today. I had emailed the respected seller who is in Asia (Thailand), and he replied that the package was sent Registered mail. Yesterday the postman left the calling card for me to get the package from the post office today. When I got it, it was taped up in green tape on one end. The tape had printing on it and read "Inspected by US Customs and Border Patrol".

 

Needless to say, I was a bit worried.

 

I opened the package gingerly, trying not to rip open anything inside. I found that the envelope was cut open and that the paper taped to and surrounding the banknotes was ripped open. The seller had placed my three notes in a clear plastic sleeve and taped that to a very sturdy plastic sheet with corrugated middle, so nothing had been warped or bent. one note was visible through the plastic, and you could see that there was more, but could not tell what they were. Thankfully, the notes were not removed for a more detailed inspection.

 

This is the first time this has happened to me. I really don't know what to think about it. I don't feel that there was 'really' anything bad about it, but I wonder what they thought they were getting into.

 

My wife told me that she has heard of this happening lately with some friends she corresponds with and sends cards back and forth to. She gets a lot more mail from more exotic places than I do, and I haven't seen her mail opened up (Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, just last week), but she told me that there have been people who have sent cards from Canada and have had them 'inspected' recently.

 

Has anyone else had this happen lately?

 

Yes, this happen all the time when I send banknotes to my USA and Canadian buyers. If the envelope is bulky especially I put some really hard cardboard, the custom usually open to inspect them. Once I send a few notes worth US$4000 which include a Singapore $1000 bill. Luckily, my buyer said that nothing have been touch or taken out. They only cut open to inspect and later seal it up with the custom tape. It is more frightening if the value of the notes is a large one.

 

I usually wrote something on the cardboard addressing to the custom "Hobby - Exchange notes - only face value". In Canada, they charge custom taxes on the banknotes if they are not declared on the value.

 

At least, the USA custom is honest. In India and in some other countries, they remove the banknotes.

 

:ninja:;);)

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What happens is that due to terrorism scare, customs want to make sure that you aren't funding someone. This is what I have been hearing, but they will appearently keep track of list of people, both buyers and sellers BUT don't trust me word on it. Banknotes, especially US appearently have some sort of special metallic thread in it which shows up in the scanner. (makes you wonder why they are so good in picking these up)

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I can't imagine that you'll have any problems with mail from Belgium. I've never had difficulties sending or receiving from western Europe.

Hehe! You are not living in Romania, I have about 4 letters that I sent registered and about 3 that was presumed to receive, that are misiing, just in this year....

So be glad, when they just look and do not take...

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Seems Latvian custom service has much more modern equipment than American one! :ninja: About 5 times package or envelope came with seal of "LR muita" (Customs of Latvian Republic) there was just small hole about 5mm (1/3in) in diameter. I believe they're using some kind of endoscope.

 

There was registred envelope from Belgium that came really ripped but none of coins were gone. Must be I'm lucky! ;)

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Seems Latvian custom service has much more modern equipment than American one! ;) About 5 times package or envelope came with seal of "LR muita" (Customs of Latvian Republic) there was just small hole about 5mm (1/3in) in diameter. I believe they're using some kind of endoscope.

 

There was registred envelope from Belgium that came really ripped but none of coins were gone. Must be I'm lucky! ;)

I hope the endoscope wasn't used for medical purposes beforehand ;):ninja:

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Yesterday I've received a gift from Scottishmoney (thank you Dave!), and it seems that US customs has opened it (a big corner of enveloppe was broken). Romanian Post has put it into a sealed plastic bag and I've found inside a paper that announced me about the fact. The postal card and the uncirculated chinese note from inside were intact.

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Yesterday I've received a gift from Scottishmoney (thank you Dave!), and it seems that US customs has opened it (a big corner of enveloppe was broken). Romanian Post has put it into a sealed plastic bag and I've found inside a paper that announced me about the fact. The postal card and the uncirculated chinese note from inside were intact.

 

If a corner's missing, it more likely that it was damaged by a mail processing machine. All customs that I know of usually open packages and letters neatly. I also am not aware of any (Western) country inspecting outgoing mail.

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I don't think I've ever had anything opened by customs much less a duty imposed. My uncle however did have an interesting adventure in the late 1960s or early 1970s when he ordered some bullion from the Bank of Montreal. He ordered some 1/2 kilo silver bars and all was fine with them, so he decided to order some gold ingots from the bank. Well, the bank of Montreal got his money and he got a card from the customs and postal inspector announcing that pursuant to Presidential Executive Order 6102 his package had been confiscated! Lucky gold was only $35 an ounce back then, but still not a pleasant experience!

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I don't think I've ever had anything opened by customs much less a duty imposed. My uncle however did have an interesting adventure in the late 1960s or early 1970s when he ordered some bullion from the Bank of Montreal. He ordered some 1/2 kilo silver bars and all was fine with them, so he decided to order some gold ingots from the bank. Well, the bank of Montreal got his money and he got a card from the customs and postal inspector announcing that pursuant to Presidential Executive Order 6102 his package had been confiscated! Lucky gold was only $35 an ounce back then, but still not a pleasant experience!

 

:ninja: (not at your father's misfortune, but rather at the incident itself) I wonder what happened to the gold?

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