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1801 Séjour à Paris du roi et de la reine d'Etrurie, France.


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1801 Séjour à Paris du roi et de la reine d'Etrurie, France.

975874.jpg

34mm - Details - R+

 

Sometimes when you've got a website people write with things available for sale. A woman in British Columbia wrote me about this medal, asking what its value was (I said ~ $300) and a bit of history. Long story short I offered $100 and after a few weeks of frustration she took me up on it. I had pointed out that no one really knew about the Tuscan Bourbons and that unless she could get a European auction house to carry a single item she was unlikely to get the higher price. Local people offered her $25 Canadian, which was an insult in my opinion.

 

If you read the details you'll get to a Wikipedia link that tells the story of the 6 year Kingdom. Louis I died early and his wife became regent for his young son. A few beautiful coins, none of which I own, show them on the obverse.

 

I've wanted this medal for many, many years. There are three varieties that I know of and while this is rare, it's certainly the most common variety.

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It really is a striking piece but then again I drool every time I go to your website...if I remember correctly, it was his father who won out between Louis and Leopold who were both wanting to claim the Spanish throne once the horribly inbred Charles II died. Lot of history and confusing family lines there :ninja:

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Nice. First time i've seen a bona fide example. Paris mint re-strikes appear on the market from time to time (cornucopia edge mark), in fact there's one on the go just now that i had been eyeing up but have decided against buying (ebay item 260511741783). Different design details obverse to your example.

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Yeah this is an original strike. It was treated with the Paris Mint's dark chocolate artificial patina that has faded somewhat to the left of the Genie on the reverse. The one on the Bay is rare, if it were an original. It is an example of Bramsen 153, undoubtedly struck from the original dies but definitely post-1880. In fact the greenish tinge makes me suspect 1910-1930 when the Mint experimented with various treatments that produced that oddly greenish-bronze look.

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