Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

GOETZ: K-126 Johan Jakob Rehbach


Recommended Posts

Sometimes it is difficult for me to realize that these pieces are cast and not struck.... :ninja:

 

I agree. I have to remind myself of that fact most times I see one of your Goetz medals. I particularly like the reverse design on this one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

cast? Wow. That would have fooled me and no doubts about it.

 

What casting method was used?

 

Perhaps the easiest way to have you learn about the process is to have you google "French sand casting" or "sand casting". Do not get this process mixed up with the "Lost wax process" as they are two entirely different processes where as sand casting uses negative moulds placed together and the lost wax process uses a pattern.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps the easiest way to have you learn about the process is to have you google "French sand casting" or "sand casting".  Do not get this process mixed up with the "Lost wax process" as they are two entirely different processes where as sand casting uses negative moulds placed together and the lost wax process uses a pattern.

 

Sand casting has been used down through the ages, at least as far as numismatics is concerned, since the casting of Roman Aes Graves. I think I understand that particular process reasonably well without the need to review via google.

 

I was actually wondering if there was a methodology other than sand casting that was used for the medals you have been showing (such as centrifugally filled dies or ...other)? The surfaces seem far too good for traditional sand cast medals IMHO.

 

These medals you have been showing are truly exceptional if manufactured by sand casting. As I said, I would have great difficulty in concluding they were cast just by looking at the images. For starters, there's no obvious air bubble type surface pock marks normally associated with and typical of cast `creations'. Judging from modern cast `creations' I have seen, the manufacturers should perhaps step back a few decades and re-learn how Goetz managed to do it. The technology has very obviously been forgotten or perhaps just not applied in modern times.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...