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It's not an error, though...it is a die variety.

signed,

 

Grumpy old man who STILL gets irritated at this common misconception. :ninja:

 

Edited to add that those cents are truly nice.

 

Ok, I'll bite, because I am, apparantly, also taken in by the misconception. If I am stamping out dies and I mess up one of them such that the hub strikes repeatedly, now the coins made with the resulting die show doubling. It was clearly unintentional, and thus, would seem to be in the realm of an error classification. Now true, it is the die that is messed up and there is no error in the minting of the coin, *except* using a messed up die. It is different than, say, the planchet slipping or the die striking twice, but it is sure not intentional.

 

When you say a die variety, it sounds more appropriate if you are talking about an intentional modification to the die - RPD or RPM or even a major design change. I don't get - explain please.

 

 

 

(you may be grumpy, but you got nice coins)

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The coin, itself, technically is a die variety--whether the die cutter meant to create the variety or not is irrelevant. (The die, itself, can be an error, though.) All coins struck from that particular die will show the same doubling which diferenciates them from the standard die for that denomination/year/mm.

 

Coin errors result from and can occur ONLY on an individual mis-struck coin and as such each is unique to any other coin of that particular denomination/year/mm regardless of which die was used to strike it.

 

Jim

 

edited to add:

 

Thanks for the complement on my coins.

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  • 3 months later...
Here's a 1983-P quarter my aunt got in change at a supermarket.  I think it's really neat to find something like this in circulation... any ideas on what it's worth?  It's my first ever error coin

 

-Zem

 

off_quarter.jpg

 

 

Nice find for a circulation piece! When did you find this? Being dated 1983, if you found it recently I am guessing some collector must have released it back into circulation. I would be very surprised that such a piece has circulated all these years.

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My Aunt got the quarter in change at a Shaw's supermarket about 5 years ago, she had held on to it for a while bot gave it to me because she thought I would have more use for it, being a collector :lol: I was just so amazed that this was in circulation, It probably was accidentally spent by a collector or something

:ninja:

 

-Zem

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And two pennies, the one on the left is a 1943 steel cent that has the four in the date very faint i.e. "19 3" the one on the right is not a mint error (I dont think) but it's quite interesting. I found it on the ground in Washington, DC after visiting the "legendary coins" smithsonian exhibit

 

-Zem

 

scan0042.jpg

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And two pennies, the one on the left is a 1943 steel cent that has the four in the date very faint i.e. "19 3" the one on the right is not a mint error (I dont think) but it's quite interesting.  I found it on the ground in Washington, DC after visiting the "legendary coins" smithsonian exhibit

 

-Zem

 

scan0042.jpg

 

The 1943 on the left... I have a few that are like this... at least one of those dies had a filled 4... oh to find the coin it dropped it on :ninja: <I can dream to :lol:>

 

The Lincoln on the right there looks like salt damage. Coins like this are common on the side of the road in citiess where it snows a lot. They get salted along with the snow and unless someone like you picks them up they eat away into nothing.

 

Cool coins in all your posts. I am a fan of the offcenters and was also quite supprised at the Quarter found in circ. Quite a deal on that dime also. That would get about $5 on the Bay. $1 in a shop is great!

 

-Bobby

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Why is it so special to find error coins? Is it just something that people get interested in, is there something special about them. Just a silly question from a newbie!

 

There are no silly questions, that is what we are here for :lol:

 

To answer your questions:

 

They are diferent, and some of the time rare

 

Yes, some peoples entire collection is Errors.

 

The reason I beleieve people get into errors is becasue they are out of the norm. They are mistakes that "should not" be out there in the first place. The newer ones are more rare as the mint is startying to take (morte effective) preventitive measures to keep errors out of circulation.

 

Some people (including myself) get a kick out of having a coin that is not of the norm and in some cases unique.

 

I hope that helps you understand our warp minds :ninja:

 

-Bobby

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Lol, I've always wanted to find clips in change.... I check change obsessively... :lol: 

 

As to why it's so special, just look to eBay :cry:eBay: hyper-rich-people welcome

 

I sooooo, wish I could find something like that :ninja:

 

-Zem

 

 

The mercury Lincoln Dime I had bought was worth that much. This is a fraudulent auction. No mention of a 3rd party grading etc. This is a pretty old scam unfortunately.

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As to why it's so special, just look to eBay :lol:eBay: hyper-rich-people welcome

 

$150K opening bid, $250K buy it now and the seller doesn't offer insurance for shipping! Profit margins on 11 cents are certainly slim these days. :ninja:

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Hi,

 

There are so many things in this thread that could use some clarification. Let's start with the explanation of the errors vs. varieties. Just to back it up, the explanation given was accurate.

 

Errors are mistakes in the minting process but are considered as individual mishaps in the minting process. While unique , so to speak, as each is individual, not all are rare. Some mishaps happen frequently and those errors are worth less. Coins struck on incomplete planchets (clips) are not worth a huge amount unless a large percentage of the planchet is missing. Usually, a cent can be had for $3.00 or less. A nickel $5.00 or less, a Quarter, abou $12.00 and a half for about $30.00 or so.

 

Off center coinage is fairly common and if the date is still there, is worth a little more. The quarter shown is worth about $15.00 the dime about $8.00 and an off center cent can be had for $4.00 or less.

 

As explained, even though one might say that it was an error when the die was hubbed incorrectly, the hobby considers coins struck by a particular die or die pair as a variety since all coins struck by that die or dies will exhibit exactly the same characteristics. As a die is used, The condition of the die may vary, but the details are still the same.

 

Die states are talked about, eg. Early Die State (EDS), Middle Die State (MDS) and Late Die State (LDS) but the details are still the same just differing by the amount of wear on the die. For example, a variety might be 1972 Doubled Die cent #DDO-001. The doubling will be the same on all of the coins struck by the same die. Differences may be visible depending upon the wear of the dies but that's it. Dies are so easily distinguished that all all genuine 1972 DDO #DDO-001 Lincoln cents have a miniscule fingerlike projection that goes from the rim toward the "D" of UNITED on every coin. The ability to distinguish that DDO from any other is the "Variety".

 

In the scan with the two cents. The 1943 cent is an example of a replated, reprocessed cent. These coins used to rust badly that companies outside the mint used to replate them so they can be sold again to collectors. Reprocessed cents were damaged outside the mint as far as collectors are concerned and they lose some of their value. They are worth about ten cents. It is also common for the 4 to be weak on these cents. Even normal 1943 "Steel" cents sometimes show a weakness of the 4.

The other cent is simply corroded. Our cents are now, basically zinc plated with a small layer of copper. When the copper surface is damaged, the zinc underneath which easily corrodes begins to look like the stuff on that coin.

 

I hope this information helps.

Have Fun,

Bill

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Hi,

What you bought was a common item manufactured outside the mint. (WINGED LIBERTY dime and CENT combination) They are called magicians coins. They are used in slight of hand tricks to make people think a cent has turned into a dime. I have several here. they are worth about $4.00 U.S.

 

The coin on the Ebay page may, and isay "MAY" be a genuine rare error. I can't tell without seeing it, but it has happened in recent times that a "mule" (mismatched dies) have produced real coins like this. We call errors like this, 11cent pieces. They are not worth as much as is being asked, but they are rare and valuable.

 

Have Fun,

Bill

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The mercury Lincoln Dime I had bought was worth that much.  This is a fraudulent auction.  No mention of a 3rd party grading etc.  This is a pretty old scam unfortunately.

Not entirely true. There is an example of this creature. If I am not mistaken, it was also featured in coin world a couple years ago. From the way it is written, I do not think that this is a scam. Also, about that time frame that this was discovered, I think the state of California had a couple bank boxes that they were selling the contents of. The state called in the Secret Service to investigate and verify that 2 coins that they found in one of the boxes were legitamate. One was a double reverse dime and the other was a double reverse quarter. The design diagnostics put the 2 coins in the 1965 date range. And after considerable studying, the Secrett Service authenticated the 2 coins. So, it is not impossible for freaks of nature in the coin world. LOL I wonder though just how many true mules there are? I mean the average joe blow if he notices a weirdness on a coin, will toss it in a junk box and forget about it. In other words, how many more 1999 Cent/Dime mules are there? As to date that is the only one that I am aware of existing. But, all in all, I believe the auction to be true. Mainly because the dealer states that arrangements will be made to guarantee the safety and proper completion of the auction. Which usually on coins of this calliber, sounds like the dealer may be willing to fly to various places.

 

On another note, those 2 double reverses were sold on consignment if I recall through Fred Wineberg(SP?). If you want to see some amazing ERRORs look his site up on google. And if my memory serves me correct, he was the seller or the middle man for ALL 15 known quarter/dollar mules a few years ago.

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