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Finally got my hands on a nice palladium coin


gxseries
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Nothing fanciful except this one is in it's original case and COA which is pretty much non-existant these days. Trust me, lots of people have made them into jewellery *yuck* or remove them from the plastic packaging and sell them off as bullions. I'm much happier to pay more for the box even though lots of people say, just buy the coin.

 

1990pd10r.jpg

 

Palladium sure gives out a wierd grey color... I still find it pretty strange. And it does cost you a fair bit at the same time.

 

The other reason why I bought this coin is because I want to know how the Soviet Union mints marketed their coins overseas. In the past, it would have been Mezhnumizmatika. But to who did they market to? For this particular palladium series, MTB banking corporation did the distribution. The story doesn't just end there - it seems to be more chaotic than I first thought and it would be worthwhile tracking as much information as possible before it's all lost. For instance, I had a seller that sold me a couple of the 1990 World Children Summit in New York claimed that his father got them from the UN headquarters. Mint packaging were either made in Germany or Canada - some pretty neat stuff but it gets harder to look for more information.

 

Hope you found that interesting!

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Nothing fanciful except this one is in it's original case and COA which is pretty much non-existant these days. Trust me, lots of people have made them into jewellery *yuck* or remove them from the plastic packaging and sell them off as bullions. I'm much happier to pay more for the box even though lots of people say, just buy the coin.

 

snipped

 

Palladium sure gives out a wierd grey color... I still find it pretty strange. And it does cost you a fair bit at the same time.

 

The other reason why I bought this coin is because I want to know how the Soviet Union mints marketed their coins overseas. In the past, it would have been Mezhnumizmatika. But to who did they market to? For this particular palladium series, MTB banking corporation did the distribution. The story doesn't just end there - it seems to be more chaotic than I first thought and it would be worthwhile tracking as much information as possible before it's all lost. For instance, I had a seller that sold me a couple of the 1990 World Children Summit in New York claimed that his father got them from the UN headquarters. Mint packaging were either made in Germany or Canada - some pretty neat stuff but it gets harder to look for more information.

 

Hope you found that interesting!

Very interesting! :art:

 

Palladium is mixed with gold in making gold tooth inlays -- didn't know that until my dentist told me the other day. One of my gold inlay fillings fell out and had to be glued back in.

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Mezhnumizmatika initially was a russian-german join, so what russians could not do in business disrtibution and sales of coins - germans did around the world :)

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BKB - did you mean the COA? It's only written in English, unlike most of the generic Soviet COAs.

 

Reverse of the coin would look something like this: http://www.firstcoincompany.com/en/catalog/10-roubles-russian-ballet-1990.html

 

Sorry I just don't have my camera and shooting pictures through the plastic film would be pretty difficult.

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Nothing fanciful except this one is in it's original case and COA which is pretty much non-existant these days. Trust me, lots of people have made them into jewellery *yuck* or remove them from the plastic packaging and sell them off as bullions. I'm much happier to pay more for the box even though lots of people say, just buy the coin.

 

1990pd10r.jpg

 

Palladium sure gives out a wierd grey color... I still find it pretty strange. And it does cost you a fair bit at the same time.

 

The other reason why I bought this coin is because I want to know how the Soviet Union mints marketed their coins overseas. In the past, it would have been Mezhnumizmatika. But to who did they market to? For this particular palladium series, MTB banking corporation did the distribution. The story doesn't just end there - it seems to be more chaotic than I first thought and it would be worthwhile tracking as much information as possible before it's all lost. For instance, I had a seller that sold me a couple of the 1990 World Children Summit in New York claimed that his father got them from the UN headquarters. Mint packaging were either made in Germany or Canada - some pretty neat stuff but it gets harder to look for more information.

 

Hope you found that interesting!

 

as I remember about of these type of coins looking at yours - seems to me that this coin does not belong to this box or a box does not belong to this coin, - coins which were sold in plastic had no box, in spite the coins sold with box but they were in capsule and with blue text certificate :)

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BKB - did you mean the COA? It's only written in English, unlike most of the generic Soviet COAs.

 

Reverse of the coin would look something like this: http://www.firstcoincompany.com/en/catalog/10-roubles-russian-ballet-1990.html

 

Sorry I just don't have my camera and shooting pictures through the plastic film would be pretty difficult.

 

I meant the coin... I will look it up.

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  • 11 months later...

The other reason why I bought this coin is because I want to know how the Soviet Union mints marketed their coins overseas. In the past, it would have been Mezhnumizmatika. But to who did they market to? For this particular palladium series, MTB banking corporation did the distribution.

 

In 1991 I saw palladium series in the central office of VneshEconomBank in Moscow. I do not remember the prices except that those were too big to apprehend, but I do remember many Mezhnumismatika posters of Ballet series and leaflets with advertisements. The coins themselves were not on display, only the images on the poster and the price.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I never saw any poster for sale in Russian Molotok on-line auction, but I think they should exist.

 

Interesting bit of history:

VneshEconomBank was a bank where all Soviet people had to keep currencies they had earned while working abroad. Usually, Soviet person got Russian roubles payment, miserable cash (US $50) in hands while staying out of USSR plus hard currency payment accumulated in VneshEconomBank on a current account. People could not use that money inside Russia, withdrawals (after long and painful bureaucratic procedures) were allowed only when Soviet person was commisioned to work abroad for the second time. The other way to get the money was to convert the currency earning into special coupons, accepted by special Beriozka shops in Moscow, St.Petersburg (then Leningrad) and several capitals of USSR republics.

My father was in military at that time and while fighting at some secret wars in wherewer Soviets helped to build 'democracy, socialism and better future' he earned quite an amount of money. In 1988 Beriozka coupons program was closed (Russians spent too much, I guess, while the state did want the people to spend currency) and the only way to 'own' hard currency legally was to keep it in Vnesheconombank. Keeping cash was forbidden by penal code (7 years of imprisonment for 'currency dealing')

 

In 1991 I was planning to leave USSR for good and my father wanted to pass somehow that money to me. It was very bad time for the country, naturally, USSR was doing whatever it could to prevent people (and governmental companies) from using hard currency. Even to enter into bank building was 2 weeks process - one must wait in line for about 2 weeks with 2-3 daily roll calls. As far as I remember we purchased the place in line and after we finally had got there it was to find out that chances to get the money are very small. One real possibility however was to spend the hard currency buying Proof silver, gold and platinum coins inside the bank.

I do remember MezhNumismatika because gold and palladium coins were almost impossible to see in jewellery shops. Since the price-list was in US dollars and deutche marks the prices were really shocking. Let's say, that an average monthly payment in USSR was equal to US $20 at goverment exchange rate (6 roubles per dollar), so if a coin was at those US $20 or even more no Russian would spend such amount in dollars for a coin. I guess it was bad investment decision and we had to buy that bullion, as our family never got anything from that bank )) For many years into new Russia times while that bank stayed in 'dormant' condition it was second in assets: it had all hard currency earned by companies and people in USSR for many years. After some posterior reformations I think there are a couple of rich private banks like VTB24 that got the assets. So I guess they still owe us those 4000 US dollars ) Do not know what would be that amount with interests )))

 

Other than those posters I knew about Mezhnumismatika from Schelokov's catalog of USSR coins and from the press, I do not know if they traded inside USSR other than in VheshEconomBank.

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