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Tolerances for 5 Kopecks of the 18th Century


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Greetings,

 

I was examoning a few 5Ks and thought one was light. So, I weighted it.

 

40.3 grams - purchased more then 15 years ago. (1782 EM)

 

Then I see one that looked heavy.

 

64.4 grams - purchased many years ago, different source (1768 EM)

 

Both well struck.

 

So, what is your heaviest 5K? What is your lightest 5K?

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Greetings,

I was examoning a few 5Ks and thought one was light. So, I weighted it.

40.3 grams - purchased more then 15 years ago. (1782 EM)

Then I see one that looked heavy.

64.4 grams - purchased many years ago, different source (1768 EM)

Both well struck.

So, what is your heaviest 5K? What is your lightest 5K?

I have a few that are about 60g. I think the lightest I have is around 43g, but I would have to weigh them all again to be certain.

 

This range of weights is fairly common for that period, and I don't think there is any system or logic to it.

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The lightest I have seen online that claimed to be at 38.8 grams (or so) but definately under 40 grams and the heaviest is what I am holding at the moment at 76.4grams. There are novodel of 5 kopek struck at 96+grams from an auction catalog that I remember.

Uzdenikov (Off Weight Russian Copper Coins, JRNS38 1990) reports a 5 Kopeck of 1758 weighing 25.8g

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  • 2 weeks later...

From what I have read, these large 5K were considered to be only bullion backing for the assignatzi of the period and so weights were controlled at the bulk level, not at the individual coin level. I can't remember whether it was at the pood level or some smaller amount. Perhaps Bob Julian can enlighten us.

 

Marv Finnley

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From what I have read, these large 5K were considered to be only bullion backing for the assignatzi of the period and so weights were controlled at the bulk level, not at the individual coin level. I can't remember whether it was at the pood level or some smaller amount. Perhaps Bob Julian can enlighten us.

Marv Finnley

I do not have the regulations in front of me but you are probably correct that

the weights were taken at the pood level. Light or heavy pieces were substituted

to make the weight come out reasonably close to standard.

 

RWJ

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Just an off topic question though, how were these copper planchets produced back on those days? :ninja:

 

Were they created from molds and then struck later? Modern day planchets are produced by stamping circular discs off sheets of metal but I doubt that was possible back in those days, given that those are really thick and mine is at 5.5-6mm thick ;)

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Just an off topic question though, how were these copper planchets produced back on those days? :ninja:

 

Were they created from molds and then struck later? Modern day planchets are produced by stamping circular discs off sheets of metal but I doubt that was possible back in those days, given that those are really thick and mine is at 5.5-6mm thick ;)

According to Rittenhouse in RNS Journal 83 (winter 2006–07) cutting presses were

used and the process is basically similar to that in use today.

 

RWJ

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