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50 Kopek coins 1922 and 1924


tqc2002
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Hi all,

 

I have these two coins of 50 Kopek and I want you to valuate them for me please, How much you think they should cost and what is the grade - Both coins are already mine and I want to know how to categorize them and how much theire value.

 

I also have "Hammered" 3 kopek of 1932 - is it rare coin? should I keep it in this condition?

 

off topic question:

I know that in Russia of 192X they have name for the coins, can someone tell me what is the name of the 1922 50 kopek and 1924 50 kopek, And I would be glad to know more names of coins that were use in Russia at 192x and up, like Pol-Kopek is 1/2 kopek, and I have heared of Denga and more :ninja:

 

Thank you all in advanced

TQ

 

3 Kopek next ..

1924_50Ks.jpg

1922_50Ks.jpg

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The name for 50 is Poltinnik. Here are some names for different coins (most of them applies to Russian Empire):

1-4 - Polushka

1-2 - Denga or Polkopeyki

1 - Kopeyka

3 - Altyn

5 - Pyatak

10 - Grivennik

20 - Dvugrivenniy

25 - Polupoltinnik

50 - Poltinnik

1.00 - Tselkoviy

5.00 - Poluimperial

7.50 - Poluimperial (due to change of weight for this name in 1897)

10.00 - Chervonets or Imperial

15 - Imperial (due to change of weight for this name in 1897)

 

In conversation we still use some old names of these coins - Pyatak, Grivennik, Poltinnik and Chervonets even though it not always deals with coins, but with paper money also.

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Thanks very much for the info Antik! I have been wondering what a list of all the denominations would look like and I don't have any kneegi to look them up in :ninja:

Can you tell me why in the list, where I would have expected to see "rouble" I see instead the word "tselkoviy"???

Oh now I see it is Ukrainian vernacular?? so it's the Ukrainyets for Ruble then?

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The name for 50 is Poltinnik. Here are some names for different coins (most of them applies to Russian Empire):

1-4 - Polushka

1-2 - Denga or Polkopeyki

1 - Kopeyka

3 - Altyn

5 - Pyatak

10 - Grivennik

20 - Dvugrivenniy

25 - Polupoltinnik

50 - Poltinnik

1.00 - Tselkoviy

5.00 - Poluimperial

7.50 - Poluimperial (due to change of weight for this name in 1897)

10.00 - Chervonets or Imperial

15 - Imperial (due to change of weight for this name in 1897)

 

In conversation we still use some old names of these coins - Pyatak, Grivennik, Poltinnik and Chervonets even though it not always deals with coins, but with paper money also.

 

Don’t forget 15 kop. = pyati-altynnik :ninja:

 

And 2 kop = Grosh

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Not for 1.5 and 3 ruble as far as I know (we call 3 rubles as banknote a "treshka" but not sure if they called a coin like that). Probably they didn't have special names because they were not a common coins like other ones. 1/8 is Polpolushki, but first part "Pol" just means "Half" (half polushka).

 

By the way as far as banknotes. Here what I can remember for now, most of them just conversational slang and never was stated as a real name on the money:

3 - Treshka

5 - Sinitsa (means "blue one", a color of 5 rubles banknote)

100 - Sotnya or Stolnik or Sotenniy

1000 - Kosar or Shtuka (last one is very modern I guess)

1 000 000 - Limon (also the modern one)

1 000 000 000 000 - Bill Gates :ninja:

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Just a question, was there a special name for 1.5 ruble, 3 ruble and then 1/8 kopek? As well as the wierd coinage of Livonteus (not too sure of spelling) 24, 48 and 96 kopek.

I have seen the 1½ roubles called a "poltora", but I think I read somewhere that that is not a correct term.

 

The 3 roubles gold coin replaced the ducat (Dutch type, if memory is correct). I think it was (is?) known (like the ducat) as a "chervonets".

 

The only 1/8 kopek I know of is the 1700 pattern, a super-rare coin. I'm not sure what it was called (maybe "polpolushka"?).

 

Coins of "LivoEsthonica" (Livonia & Estonia) were known as a "Livonaise" of 96 kopeks. I'm not sure of the metrology and do not have access to my references right now, but I think this might have corresponded to the silver value of the silver trade coins then circulating in the Baltic region (but could be wrong about that). These coins usually show up in miserable condition. To find one well-struck and free of ugly flan flaws is unusual.

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WooW!!!!

 

There are so many names! I'm starting to like that, I thought that the only names I would use while collecting Russian coins will be Kopek and Rouble. Now I see that this is not the situation and I like it, instead of using 50 kopeek I use Poltinnik (in the case of 1921-1927 coins, not sure about the 50 kopeks from 1930 and above) I'm using the word "Pol" instead of "half" :ninja: instead of half kopeek I say Pol-kopek.

 

Can any one help me with a little quesion:

What is the highest coin value that was used in Russia and Soviet Union and the Tzarist era? and what was the lowest coin value? ( I think of Pol-kopek)

 

Thank you all in advanced

TQ

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Answering the highest coin value, if you want to factor in commemorative / pattern coins, here are the following:

 

Current Russia: 10,000 ruble - kilo gold coins

Soviet Union: 150 platinum ruble. I think there were plans to strike 200 ruble (platinum and gold) coins in 1981 but that was canceled.

Tsarist era: 20 ruble (extreme rare gold pattern), otherwise 15 ruble. Inflation not factored in. :ninja:

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WooW!!!!

 

There are so many names! I'm starting to like that, I thought that the only names I would use while collecting Russian coins will be Kopek and Rouble. Now I see that this is not the situation and I like it, instead of using 50 kopeek I use Poltinnik (in the case of 1921-1927 coins, not sure about the 50 kopeks from 1930 and above) I'm using the word "Pol" instead of "half" ;) instead of half kopeek I say Pol-kopek.

 

Can any one help me with a little quesion:

What is the highest coin value that was used in Russia and Soviet Union and the Tzarist era? and what was the lowest coin value? ( I think of Pol-kopek)

 

Thank you all in advanced

TQ

 

Something just popped into my head regarding the lowest denominations. Now we all know that 1925-1927 there was a soviet half-kopeek. From 1700 to 1915 (with some gaps) there was a polushka - ¼ kopeek.

 

But in the early Russian copper coinage there are pulos.

 

In the times pre Elena Glinskaya reform the coinage across the Russian principalities was non standard, but something like a kopeek was sort of in place. I’m not sure when the actual term ‘kopeek’ became common place (I would guess after the reform), but before the reform there were some silver coins with a spear wielding horseman on the back – they could have been (potentially) called kopeeks. Now, I don’t exactly recall, but a copper pulo was valued to be something like 1/40 th of a silver kopeek. So that would be the lowest denomination ever! :ninja:

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I’m not sure when the actual term ‘kopeek’ became common place (I would guess after the reform), but before the reform there were some silver coins with a spear wielding horseman on the back – they could have been (potentially) called kopeeks.

 

According to an article published in "Modern Foreign Currency" (a 1961 collection of reprints from "The Numismatist") in 1930, the August issue had an article by Dr. A. M. Rackus "The Origin of the Kopeck" which stated:

 

The Russian term "kopeika" is a diminutive form of the word "kopio" and it means "a spear"....At the end of the fourteenth century, certain coins circulated in Russia upon which was the design of a spear and Russians simply applied the term "kopeika" (="little spear") to such coins.
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According to an article published in "Modern Foreign Currency" (a 1961 collection of reprints from "The Numismatist") in 1930, the August issue had an article by Dr. A. M. Rackus "The Origin of the Kopeck" which stated:

 

"The Russian term "kopeika" is a diminutive form of the word "kopio" and it means "a spear"....At the end of the fourteenth century, certain coins circulated in Russia upon which was the design of a spear and Russians simply applied the term "kopeika" (="little spear") to such coins."

 

As far as I've heard the first silver coin with a spear wielding rider was issued in Moscow by Urii Dmitrievich of Galich who took the city from Vasili the Blind in 1430's. Later, when Vasili came back to Moscow he continued issuing coins with the same rider, but he issued many coins with various designs: rider with falcon, siren, tree planting, bear hunt, flowers, etc. So I'm not sure that people would pick out the rider design specifically and associated it with the denomination.

 

A hundred years later, during the reign of Ivan the Terrible there was a reform that centralized and standardized russian coinage. The Novgorod weight standard was given the spear carrying horseman design, the Moscow weight coin was given the sword carrying rider design. So I'd guess thats when the larger coin, the one with the spear guy got the name kopeika. The Moscow standard coin with the sword guy probably retained the older name - denga, and was half the weight of the kopeika. Of course there was also a polushka with half the weight of the denga, by the way that's only 0.17 grams! As far as I can tell the kopeika coin was the most popular one, larger coins usually are popular (the kopeek was 0.68 grams), so the name stuck.

 

Also, according to Melnikova, Ivan the Terrible issued portrait kopeeks! The guy on the coin apparently ages on later issues, representing the aging czar!!!

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