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Dustins wierd find!


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I don't think it was a tumbler unless it was rough grit used, it doesn't appear polished (the purpose of a tumbler) at all. What about sand blasted?

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Not as much, we use sandblasting to give metal a brushed look in the bronze casting class. You can polish with it, but you need a special type of tumbled sand.

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im wondering the same thing ... :ninja:

 

Sometimes when a coin, especially pennies are struck it forms a wave in the metal that rises around the letters on the outside rim. This is actually quite normal and quite common, but whatever happened to this coin has somehow magnified that affect. It's basically the metal having been pushed by whatever force was placed on the coin.

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if it was smashed/ sand blasted wouldnt the rim of the pennie be worn off or smashed to the side? this still has the rim...

 

Smashed, yes....Sandblasted, no. Sandblasting is an interesting tool, it's very abrasive but not very destructive. Think of it as millions of little stones being tossed very fast at the coin. It will push the metal around, but not really dent it up or bend it or anything like that. It's not gentle, but it's not super harsh on metal either.

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Smashed, yes....Sandblasted, no. Sandblasting is an interesting tool, it's very abrasive but not very destructive. Think of it as millions of little stones being tossed very fast at the coin. It will push the metal around, but not really dent it up or bend it or anything like that. It's not gentle, but it's not super harsh on metal either.

i know a old feller with a sand blaster i might have to do an experiment hehe

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Hi Dusting,

 

My reference book "The Lincoln Cent Doubled Die", by John A. Wexler, has a photo of 1968 cent which shows what happens when a die is hubbed by a very worn hub. The letters of the motto actually run into the rim to be spread outward on the hub. Apparently this happened to a lot of 1968 Lincolns. However, this example does not show the cupping which your coin has. The overall mushiness of the devices cause me to think your Lincoln might have been struck with extremely worn or obstructed dies.

I do not know for certain if any of these explain what happened to your Lincoln. It is just some ideas you might want to explore when you are surfing the net.

 

corky

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Hi Dusting,

 

My reference book "The Lincoln Cent Doubled Die", by John A. Wexler, has a photo of 1968 cent which shows what happens when a die is hubbed by a very worn hub. The letters of the motto actually run into the rim to be spread outward on the hub. Apparently this happened to a lot of 1968 Lincolns. However, this example does not show the cupping which your coin has. The overall mushiness of the devices cause me to think your Lincoln might have been struck with extremely worn or obstructed dies.

I do not know for certain if any of these explain what happened to your Lincoln. It is just some ideas you might want to explore when you are surfing the net.

 

corky

thanks corky!!

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  • 7 months later...
Nice capped die !

Mud here,

 

First impression: brockage, broadstruck, cap, combination of all......but

 

It appears that both sides are concave which is impossible with these errors.

 

There is no evidence of a broadstrike, brockage, counterbrockage, cap, or partial cap error formation.

 

The error coin should, have a reverse image and or an incuse image, generally of the reverse and be asymmetrical, except for a perfect cap.

 

 

My thoughts? Someone put this coin in a collar between leather and carefully hammered it, harder in selected areas.

This method would also allow for the lettering to expand over the rim.

 

It's just a thought !!!!!

 

I recommend to all that don't have one to get a copy of "The Error Coin Encyclopedia" by Arnold Margolis.

 

Mud

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My first job ever was for a plumbing company, but the owner of the company also owned a laundromat that I serviced every once in a while. I used to find cents like this in the drums of the large dryers. They had slipped through the agitators and into the outer shell of the drum, and there they would sit and get beaten to death for years until we came along and opened up the machine to find out what the clicking noise was coming from the drum, even when there were no clothes in it.

 

We had a deal going, I got all the gold, and my boss got all the silver from the machines. You might think I wouldn't have found stuff, but I found rings, several gold chains etc.

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