Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

Real Coins or forgery?


tqc2002

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

A friend of mine bought 2 coins and he needs to know if they are real or not, can anyone give me an opinion on these coins so I can help my friend.

 

also I would be glad if you can valuate the coins (if they are real).

 

can some one identify these coins for us please (what is the value of the coins - I collect coins from 1924 and up and I'm not familiar with these coins :ninja:)

 

thanks in advanced

any pease of info will be appreciated,

 

TQ

KopBs.jpg

KopAs.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Real. About $10-$20 each.

 

Steve, I'm sure you're much more experienced than I at this, but those coins are in such poor condition, and the designs look, at least to me, so amateurishly done, especially the wings on the example on the right, that it's hard for me to believe that they are genuine.

 

Many counterfeiters, I've heard, like to beat up their coins so any details that would give them away are gone. Are you confident of your opinion on these?

 

Marv Finnley

RNS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve, I'm sure you're much more experienced than I at this, but those coins are in such poor condition, and the designs look, at least to me, so amateurishly done, especially the wings on the example on the right, that it's hard for me to believe that they are genuine.

 

Many counterfeiters, I've heard, like to beat up their coins so any details that would give them away are gone. Are you confident of your opinion on these?

 

Marv Finnley

RNS

Hi, I have collected Russian coins for more than 30 years and I don't doubt that both of the coins are genuine. The design is as it should be, color is natural, coins look abolutely normal. Both are that common as regards date and mintmark that there would be no point counterfeiting them in this poor grade.

By the way I hear that the EM 5 kopecks are still abundant in Russia in this grade of conservation. :ninja: Sigi, RNS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve, I'm sure you're much more experienced than I at this, but those coins are in such poor condition, and the designs look, at least to me, so amateurishly done, especially the wings on the example on the right, that it's hard for me to believe that they are genuine.

 

Many counterfeiters, I've heard, like to beat up their coins so any details that would give them away are gone. Are you confident of your opinion on these?

 

Marv Finnley

RNS

 

110% confident! ;)

 

Actually the condition of these examples isn't too bad. Welcome to the world of 18thC copper :ninja:

 

Steve, RNS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

110% confident! ;)

 

Actually the condition of these examples isn't too bad. Welcome to the world of 18thC copper :ninja:

 

Steve, RNS

 

 

I wonder why it seems that there is so much more relatively well preserved 18th century English copper? For example, George III half cents of 1770-1775 are fairly common in decent condition, even uncirculated examples are not hard to find. George II copper is also not that hard to find in higher circulated grades, whereas one seldom sees equivalent high grades in 18th century Russian copper.

 

Marv Finnley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder why it seems that there is so much more relatively well preserved 18th century English copper? For example, George III half cents of 1770-1775 are fairly common in decent condition, even uncirculated examples are not hard to find. George II copper is also not that hard to find in higher circulated grades, whereas one seldom sees equivalent high grades in 18th century Russian copper.

 

Marv Finnley

 

As far as the 5 Kopecks go, I remember hearing from a friend who grew up in Russia that they were often used in some kind of game where they get tossed and thrown across the ground a lot. So whatever condition they might have once been in, they got a lot worse. :ninja:

 

Other more likely reasons include the relatively crude minting technology or the possibility that they put most of their creative time and resources into minting some beautiful silver coins in St. Petersburg. With many coppers being minted around the forests and mountains of Ekaterinburg, I think they were just much less careful out there in the woods. All that said, some nice examples can be found but they are, on the whole, probably much harder to find than English examples.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...