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Lamination on 18 cent gold


Timofei
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A general question to those who often see 18th century gold coins. Did you ever noticed lamination on a 18 century gold coins of Ekaterina 2? It has never came to my attention but now I have a gold item with a lamination which is common for silver but (I think) not for gold.

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The only way I get to handle 18th century gold often is by examining lots prior to an auction :ninja:

I do not think laminations are common on gold, but I have seen a so called "planchet fault" or "metal fault" where metal actually flaked off from the middle of the planchet. I guess if the flake would remain on the coin, it would be lamination. ;)

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A general question to those who often see 18th century gold coins. Did you ever noticed lamination on a 18 century gold coins of Ekaterina 2? It has never came to my attention but now I have a gold item with a lamination which is common for silver but (I think) not for gold.

 

 

While I think the answer is quite easy, I do not understand why not to ask this on your own forum first? Or you assume there are no people who can answer this?

 

 

WCO

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While I think the answer is quite easy, I do not understand why not to ask this on your own forum first? Or you assume there are no people who can answer this?

WCO

 

2 WCO and Coinpeople moderators:

I think anybody would appreciate opinions on the subject rather than offtopic.

 

BTW I do not own any forums :ninja:

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Actually here is a question. Why isn't lamination common on gold coins? Is it because of the hardness of silver compared to gold?

There are, I think, two reasons for this:

 

1) Gold was struck in far smaller quantities than silver and was a prestige coinage, thus being watched more closely. Rolled-down ingots with noticeable laminations were probably condemned at an early stage of the coining process.

 

2) The purity of the gold coins was much higher, meaning less copper for alloy and less chance for lamination.

 

RWJ

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