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Euro Countries w/Status


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Euro Countries w/Coin Status

Country Coinage Notes
Austria 2002  
Belgium 1999  
Finland 1999  
France 1999  
Germany 2002  
Greece 2002  
Ireland 2002  
Italy 2002  
Luxemburg 2002  
Monaco 2001  
Netherlands 1999  
Portugal 2002  
San Marino 2002  
Slovenia 2007  
Spain 1999  
Vatican 2002  
     
Bulgaria 2011/2012
Cyprus 2008  
Czech Republic    
Estonia 2008 Inflation concerns
Hungary 2010+ Budget concerns
Latvia 2009 Inflation concerns
Lithuania 2009 Inflation concerns
Malta 2008  
Poland    
Romania 2014
Slovakia 2009  

Last Updated on 2/03/2007

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CoinWorld had a really nice set of articles about a few of the happenings with new countries coming on board with Euros. A lot of the info was new to me and so I decided to make this chart. Hope you find it useful.

 

Please let me know if updates are needed.

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Hello ART. In the yelow list you forget GREECE

 

Thanks. The book I was using didn't list Greece. I've updated the table.

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Czech, Poland, Slovakia...  :ninja:

Consider the bright side: You'll get Czech bimets, Polish bimets, Slovakian bimets ... :lol:

 

But there will be a couple of years until it actually comes to that. CZ and PL will certainly not introduce the euro any time soon. These two, and Hungary, are the only new member states that have not joined the Exchange Rate Mechanism. Besides, the collector coins will still be different from country to country, since they are not actually used for payments.

 

Christian

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Don't get CoinWorld but yes, some designs are promising. Others are a little boring, particularly those that basically use the same design for each denomination. The "new" EU countries that take part in the Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM-II) have all chosen their euro designs (or design themes) already:

 

Cyprus (themes)

http://www.centralbank.gov.cy/nqcontent.cf...id=2775&lang=en

 

Estonia (designs)

http://www.eestipank.info/pub/en/majandus/...vand2/hara.html

 

Latvia (themes)

http://www.bank.lv/eng/main/lvnaud/latnaud/index.php?37226

 

Lithuania (designs)

http://www.lb.lt/eng/banknotes/coins_eur.html

 

Malta (themes)

http://mfin.gov.mt/page.aspx?site=NECC&page=coinconsultation

 

Slovakia (designs)

http://www.nbs.sk/PRESS/PLAGAT_A_3.PDF

 

Slovenia (designs)

http://www.bsi.si/html/eng/projects/euro/index.html

 

Slovenia will not have any big problems meeting its euro schedule; the country can probably introduce the euro cash on 1 January. Lithuania and particularly Estonia may have to wait due to their high inflation rates, but of course this is also a political issue. The others won't join in 2007 anyway.

 

Another place that may issue euro coins in the future is Andorra. The country is not an EU member but uses the euro. The government is basically interested in coming to a monetary agreement with the EU, similar to those that Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican have. That would allow Andorra to mint a certain contingent of euro coins (see http://www.andorra.be/fr/index.htm - "ANDORRE ET L'UE" section). But I don't think this has a very high priority, neither for Andorra nor for the European Union, so it may take quite a while. :ninja:

 

Christian

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Also, the "maps" on the common sides of the euro and cent coins currently show the European Union as it was before the May 2004 enlargement. The EU decided in 2005 that the new map will simply show Europe, regardless of which countries are in the currency union or the European Union (see http://coinpeople.com/index.php?showtopic=5651 ). This is what, for example, the 1 euro and 10 cent coins will look like:

 

18-21-neue-euros11.jpg

 

However, the new designs will not be used until the first new member state introduces the euro. The current euro countries are not obliged to "switch maps" at the same time, but it would make sense to do so ...

 

Christian

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On the green list. United Kingdom, Danmark and Sweden ??

They are not yet euro countries but ...., they are EU countries.

Adding Denmark and the UK does not make sense; the two countries opted out. (The odd thing is that the Danish krone is "tied" to the euro via ERM-II, and with an even narrower fluctuation band than any of the other currencies.) Sweden is a slightly different case - the country can not actually opt out (since it joined the EU after the Maastricht Treaty became effective). But obviously it has no intention to join, and thus does (willingly) not meet the euro criteria ...

 

So I would leave these three out. They do not have anything to do with the currency union.

 

Christian

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I'm really trying to build a table of the countries that are actually issuing Euro coins and/or banknotes. Sort of a collector's checklist.

 

Can anyone furnish the dates that each of the participants first issued their Euro coins?

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Can anyone furnish the dates that each of the participants first issued their Euro coins?

Sure. :ninja:

 

Austria 2002

Belgium 1999

Finland 1999

France 1999

Germany 2002

Greece 2002

Ireland 2002

Italy 2002

Luxembourg 2002

Monaco 2001

Netherlands 1999

Portugal 2002

San Marino 2002

Spain 1999

Vatican 2002

 

These are the earliest dates you will find on the coins; the pieces were actually issued to the general public (starter kits) in mid-December 2001.

 

Christian

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  • 4 weeks later...

Update table with dates of first issue of coins that Tabbs posted. This will help in my layout for my 2€ collection.

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  • 1 month later...

It is pretty clear now that Estonia will not introduce the euro next year; according to a preliminary estimate of the European Commission (Vienna meeting, 7 April) only Slovenia will "switch" on 1 January. These are the EU countries that participate in the Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM-II) and the estimated dates - in the sense of "not before ..." - for introducing the euro:

 

Slovenia - 2007

Cyprus - 2008

Estonia - 2008

Lithuania - 2008

Malta - 2008

Latvia - 2009

Slovakia - 2009

 

Other EU member states and their status:

Czechia - may introduce the euro some time after 2010

Denmark - joined the EU before the Maastricht Treaty and "opted out" of the common currency, but the Danish krone participates in ERM-II with a very narrow fluctuation band

Hungary - may introduce the euro some time after 2014

Poland - may follow the Swedish model

Sweden - has willingly not met the stability criteria so far (referendum about the euro in 2003, with a "No" majority)

UK - joined the EU before the Maastricht Treaty and "opted out" of the common currency

Bulgaria and Romania are likely to join the EU in 2007 but will not introduce the euro for quite a while.

 

Christian

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Since I live close to Belgium and the Netherlands, but far away from Poland, I don't really care about what currency they use over there. :ninja: But after the kind of flexible approach concerning the initial euro countries, the EU (Commission, Council and the ECB) now follows a stricter policy. Which is why Estonia won't be "in" next year and Lithuania is a borderline case. Guess that will also affect other future "candidates" ...

 

Christian

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Czech, Poland, Slovakia...  :ninja:

I'm with you--especially as Poland's concerned. I'll miss the zloty. I just hope Poland keeps up the stunning designs they're so good at... I still find a Europe without the mark, the franc, the lira, the drachma, a little inconceivable.

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I'm with you--especially as Poland's concerned.  I'll miss the zloty.

Don't worry, the zloty is there to stay. Especially with the current Polish government, and even more so with its new coalition partner ... but I guess that does not belong in here. Well, the European Union does not force any country to join, and won't keep any from leaving. And of course it won't force any country to be in the currency union.

 

The currency union as it is, with just some of the member states participating, basically works fine, I think. (Whether it has a long term perspective under the current conditions is another question.) Countries that want to join, and meet the convergence criteria, can join. Countries that either do not want to join, or do not meet those criteria, stay out. Does not seem to be a problem.

 

I still find a Europe without the mark, the franc, the lira, the drachma, a little inconceivable.

Maybe we can set up a special "Quaint Old Europe" theme park somewhere - with border checks every few kilometers, and separate currencies for each attraction or ride. :ninja:

 

Christian

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  • 1 month later...

Today the European Commission (EC) and the European Central Bank (ECB) presented their convergence reports for Lithuania and Slovenia. In both countries the government plans to introduce the common currency on 1 January - but only Slovenia got the "go ahead" from the Commission today.

 

Here is some info in English, from the Commission and ECB websites:

 

Commission Recommendation: Slovenia

http://www.europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAc...&guiLanguage=en

http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/public...slovenia_en.htm

 

Commission Recommendation: Lithuania

http://www.europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAc...&guiLanguage=en

http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/public...ithuania_en.htm

 

ECB Convergence Report

http://www.ecb.eu/press/pr/date/2006/html/pr060516.en.html

(press release)

http://www.ecb.eu/pub/convergence/html/index.en.html

(full report)

 

The European Council will decide in June or July. It does not necessarily have to follow these assessments and recommendations.

 

Christian

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  • 5 months later...

The European Commission has just (10 November) presented its new euro area enlargement report. Nothing really new in there, but a few dates may be interesting ...

 

Slovenia will introduce the euro in about six weeks, on 1 January. For two weeks, both tolar and euro cash can then be used for payments.

 

1-Jan-2008 is the euro introduction date that Cyprus and Malta currently aim at. As for the other countries, here are the dates in brief:

 

Czech Republic: no target date specified*

Estonia: 2008 (but that is not very likely, C.)

Latvia: 2008 (ditto, C.)

Lithuania: no target date specified*

Hungary: no target date specified*

Poland: no target date specified*

Slovakia: 2009

Sweden: no target date specified*

 

(* That practically translates to "some time after 2010". Or maybe never; see my previous replies here. As for Cyprus and Malta, the Commission and the Council will decide next year whether the two can join or not.)

 

Fourth report on the practical preparations for the future enlargement of the euro area

http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/public...671final_en.pdf

 

Christian

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