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1735 coin, help!


itshim
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Thank you both for the reply.

 

Back in May, I was in Russia for a few weeks vacationing and while I was at a large flea market in St. Petersburg, I found quite a few old coins and bought them very cheap (U.S. equivelent $10). This one is in the best condition, and I have to admit, due to it's age and condition, it continues to intrigue me.

 

I have quite a few other coins that are relatively just as old but in pretty rough conidtion. But I have not ruled out the possibility that they could all be fakes.

 

Any further information about this would be greatly appreciated.

 

Also, Alexbq--what do you find wrong with it?

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The first thing that is wrong with it - price. Even in this condition a real coin would cost more. So most likely most of the coins you bought are fakes. This one looks like a cast copy. BTW, if Russian customs would catch you crossing the border with real coins - you would be in a load of troubles. So it probably is a good thing that they are fakes. :)

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I didn't really consider the price of it to be a true indicator of its authenticity primarily because I didn't buy it from a professional seller, In otherwords, buying it from a collecter--is more of a "you pay for what you get" where as buying in a flea market has a "skys the limit" type of potential. This was a very large flea market BTW where people from all over the country side sell their goods. There were several antiques of all types, where the buying grounds had more of a basement-like appearence to it all. Now that doesn't automatically cancel out frauds of all types, but I consider it to be less risque in these types of situations.

 

I do think though that there is a possibility that it is a cast copy. Primairly because my ameteur eyes and google research hasn't pulled up or observed anything exactly like it.

 

I'd be curious to hear any other opinions about what fakes look like and any other possible dead giveaways based on the photos.

 

 

Also--is anyone familiar with a Russian coin expert of any kind in the NYC area?

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The first thing that is wrong with it - price. Even in this condition a real coin would cost more. So most likely most of the coins you bought are fakes. This one looks like a cast copy. BTW, if Russian customs would catch you crossing the border with real coins - you would be in a load of troubles. So it probably is a good thing that they are fakes. :)

 

Ditto on all of that!

 

Some American student had a very cheap, but authentic Nicholas 2 rouble in his bag when going home. Last we heard he was in jail. Was it a 3 year sentence?

 

I also hear now there's some trouble with people receiving coins in mail in Russia. Apparently, one can get into trouble buying coins while in Russia these days! :shock:

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On a related but not quite the same topic: American buyers can not get in trouble for purchasing coins correct? At the worst the person in Russia would be violating the Russian antiquities laws not the American citizen, correct?

 

I typically don't buy from Russia itself, mostly from the satellite countries of the former USSR. But this information would be good to know ahead of time, especially if there was an issue of the item being seized at customs and a refund/refusal situation.

 

Nick

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On a related but not quite the same topic: American buyers can not get in trouble for purchasing coins correct? At the worst the person in Russia would be violating the Russian antiquities laws not the American citizen, correct?

 

I typically don't buy from Russia itself, mostly from the satellite countries of the former USSR. But this information would be good to know ahead of time, especially if there was an issue of the item being seized at customs and a refund/refusal situation.

 

Nick

I'm not a lawyer -- and certainly not a Russian lawyer! :lol: But surely these export restrictions are based on the UNESCO agreement for protecting objects of national and international cultural importance? How strictly each country implements those agreements, is another thing. The UNESCO agreement, IIRC, applies automatically to objects which are 100 or more years old (you can find these documents with Google). For some countries, shorter time spans may apply; for Russia, I believe it is more like only 50 years.

 

If an American (or any foreigner) buys something in Russia, it would be the responsibility of that buyer to respect the applicable laws pertaining to export of cultural property and Russian customs duties -- there might be differences in application depending on whether the guilty party were Russian or not, but I would assume that they would be AT LEAST as strict with foreigners exporting prohibited items. But it could be that the sale itself might be subject to other laws which have nothing to do with export/import of cultural property; these would have to be respected by the seller.

 

Could be that it is a little like the laws about prostitution: Some countries punish the prostitutes, others the clients, and yet others both! ;)

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