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From the auction description

 

New York. New York City. 1860 J.N.T. Levick “Smoker" token. Miller NY 428. Brass. Gem Prooflike Uncirculated.

 

By George Hampden Lovett. Obv. Jolly Regency era smoker, NO PLEASURE CAN EXCEED – THE SMOKING OF THE WEED. Rev.

Crossed pipes over tobacco box, issued by a famous pioneer numismatist and American Numismatic Society officer, J.N.T. Levick (1828-1909).

 

This token was voted for listing in The 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens book, a copy of which should be in your numismatic library.

If not, hasten to Stack's website and buy one, or, borrow one free of charge from the ANA Library.

Whatever you do, get set for an evening of enjoyable, informative reading.

 

Warning: it can be dangerous to your pocketbook, as without doubt many pieces will be added to your Want List!

 

 

From the Q. David Bowers Collection; ex John Jay Ford, Jr. Collection; previously ex F.C.C. Boyd.

 

 

 

 

 

J.N.T. Levick is one of the most famous of all late 19th and early 20th century coin collectors and dealers.

Born in 1828, he became a broker in government securities and banking and amassed a fortune.

 

He soon became interested in rare coins and especially tokens, and was instrumental in the foundation of the

American Numismatic Association and the American Numismatic Society.

He loved his tokens and had a series of his own struck by George H. Lovett.

 

He was one of the earliest serious collectors of Hard Times tokens and his 1870 catalogue of 56 types served

as the basis for Low's later analysis of the series. He died in 1908, a lifelong smoker

 

 

 

 

 

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Lincoln Anti Slavery token

 

 

 

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Massachusetts. Boston. Henry Cook Medal. Rulau Ma-Bo 19. Copper. Choice Uncirculated.

 

Obv. Constitution in glory of weapons and banners, never to be surrendered TO TRAITORS & REBELS… NO SURRENDER OF THE FORT SUMTER OF THE NORTH. Rev. Circle wreath, 11-line inscription of Friend Street, Boston, MONEY BROKER AND DEALER IN RARE AND ANTIQUE COINS, MEDALS, AUTOGRAPHS… Here is a very high quality, generously sized (42mm) and somewhat belligerent token, both numismatic and patriotic. Much mint red.

 

Henry Cook, who would become one of America’s first rare coin dealers, was born in Abington, MA, in 1821, a seventh-generation Mayflower descendant.

He moved to Boston when he was 16 years old and gained employment with a company in the export trade. At the age of 21 he was sent to South America

to handle the firm’s interests on the west coast there. Later he served as mate aboard a sailing vessel which traded along that coast and with islands in the Pacific.

 

By the 1840s he was an avid coin collector.

In the 1850s he relinquished seafaring for the security of an on-land occupation in Boston, and entered the boot and shoe trade at 74 Friend Street.

He was fond of looking through copper half cents and cents in circulation and picking out scarce dates which he displayed in a counter in his shoe shop.

It seems that he was active in the rare coin business by the mid-1850s.

Circa 1862 he commissioned a selection of patriotic medals to be struck from his own designs, with dies by George H. Lovett.

In 1866, still located in his shoe shop-with-coins at 74 Friend Street, Cook advertised as: “Numismatist and antiquarian.

Rare and antique coins, medals, autographs, books, &c., bought, sold and exchanged. Cabinets arranged and catalogued for public sale in Boston or New York.

Also, purchases made at all the coin and book sales in either of the above mentioned cities, on commission.”

 

On April 6 of the same year he was elected treasurer at the founding meeting of the New England Numismatic and Archaeological Society.

In 1869 Cook issued a 12-page listing, Coin and Medal Circular, Containing a Few Remarks on the American Series of Coins and Medals.

With a Little Brief Advice to the Inexperienced Collector.

 

 

 

From the Q. David Bowers Collection.

 

 

 

 

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I followed the sale of those live on the internet. Congratulations, you picked up a few fantastic pieces. I landed two from the trade tokens and so-called dollars. I didn't have deep enough pockets for my highest priority pieces in that auction. In all, I got two out of 15 on my list.

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I followed the sale of those live on the internet. Congratulations, you picked up a few fantastic pieces. I landed two from the trade tokens and so-called dollars. I didn't have deep enough pockets for my highest priority pieces in that auction. In all, I got two out of 15 on my list.

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, most went for very big money. There was a recent British Conder token auction that was

around the same time and they went for even bigger money.

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