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I updated my gallery...


bobh
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bobh posted his gallery, well worth looking at. For those interestedf in varieties, the 1914 50 kopecks (poltina) has two different obverses. One is shown by bobh the other shown here, if I can get the photo to print as desired!

Thanks to you and Grivna for posting the image. :ninja:

 

The Kazakov catalog probably has the best pictures and most varieties of any catalogs currently available for coins of Nicholas II (the only period covered). This variety corresponds to No. 462 in his book, and mine would be No. 463.

 

In this catalog, the variety of 1914 poltina I have is the more common one, described as "embossed striking, wide rim". I'm not sure what significance the arrows in your image have -- the back side of the neck is somewhat farther away from the legend in yours, but I haven't caught the other difference yet. However, the "Adam's apple" on the bust is different. The design of the head and neck as a whole seems a bit narrower and taller in the variety that I have.

 

Kazakov lists prices for 462 in UNC at $250 and for 463 at $180. Since the book was published in 2004, I find that these prices are still relevant, unlike those in Krause. For collectors interested in this relatively short period of Russian coin history, I think it is a "must have".

 

By the way, RW, you are quoted as a source for one or two of the images (look on page 33 for the reference; your book is listed as No. 46 in the bibliography, and coin no. 28 -- the small head pattern 50 kopek coin of 1895 -- appears to be a scan directly from your book. There are two other coins listed as coming from source 46 -- i.e. your book -- but these are gold coins, so maybe there is a mistake here.)

 

In the introduction on p. 33, Kazakov says:

"Six coins could not be found either in the State Historic Museum, the Hermitage or in private collections in Russia. Their pictures were taken from the previously published sources..."

 

I hope they at least give you a free copy of the book now! :lol:

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I'm not sure what significance the arrows in your image have -- the back side of the neck is somewhat farther away from the legend in yours, but I haven't caught the other difference yet.

 

It's not my image or my arrows, but in comparison with your coin, it looks to me like the "Б" at the beginning of the obverse legend has differing placements relative to the denticles. It's not an immediately obvious difference, but if you compare the two images, I think you will agree that it is there.

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I have not seen Kazakov, but it is interesting to know that he caught the1914 poltina differences. Grivna has it right, in that the denticles do not line up the same with the first letter (B) of the inscription giving the titles of Nicholas II. In fact this is about the only way to determine some of the hub changes for Nicholas II.

 

The Kazakov rarities for these two varieties also seem correct as I have seen more of the one illustrated by bobh.

 

The 1895 poltina pattern was discovered by accident. I had photographed a large number of coins at the Smithsonian in the 1970s and this was one of them. When I was preparing my book on the silver of 1796-1917, I printed the negative with the idea of using it for the general picture of this type; once it was printed, however, I realized that the head was different and therefore a pattern.

 

RWJ

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Thanks to you and Grivna for posting the image. :ninja:

 

 

By the way, RW, you are quoted as a source for one or two of the images (look on page 33 for the reference; your book is listed as No. 46 in the bibliography, and coin no. 28 -- the small head pattern 50 kopek coin of 1895 -- appears to be a scan directly from your book. There are two other coins listed as coming from source 46 -- i.e. your book -- but these are gold coins, so maybe there is a mistake here.)

 

In the introduction on p. 33, Kazakov says:

"Six coins could not be found either in the State Historic Museum, the Hermitage or in private collections in Russia. Their pictures were taken from the previously published sources..."

 

I hope they at least give you a free copy of the book now! :lol:

 

I neglected to comment on this point. You are right in that the silver book does not mention gold coins. Bitkin also uses the 1895 pattern illustration from my book and attributes it.

 

RWJ

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I have added my 5 rouble and 7-1/2 rouble coins to the gallery.

 

Also, I have re-organized things so that each coin year, MM and type has its own sub-gallery. This should make it easier to find any particular coin much more easily.

 

Next on the agenda will be my Swiss 20 Fr. Helvetia and Vreneli gold coins -- I really need to finish the gold coin series so that I can bring them all back to the bank and put them in the safe-deposit box! Hopefully I will accomplish this tomorrow.

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Definately nice photography there Bobh :lol:

 

Ironically, my Nikolai II coin grades are a lot worse than most of my older Russian coins :ninja:

 

I guess Nikolai II isn't my preferred era, and the same goes for Alexsander III...

 

Keep it going!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(I better start looking for better ones before Bobh hoards them all :cry: )

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  • 2 weeks later...

Added some more Russian coins to my Gallery today:

- some 1 rouble coins (Nicholas I - Alexander II - Nicholas II) including examples of both the embossed and flat striking types of the 1913 Romanov commemorative rouble;

- some modern commemorative proof coins.

 

The 1854-NI rouble is quite nice, and the modern commemorative gold and silver coins are quite spectacular for their designs.

 

I took these proof coin photos over a year ago with my old Panasonic Lumix DMC-LC5 camera with a close-up lens attachment. I got quite frustrated with this camera and switched to a Nikon CoolPix for the other things, but the Panasonic did a very good job with these proof coins for some reason. I might mention that I used a halogen spot for lighting with the Panasonic pictures.

 

Enjoy! :ninja:

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