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thedeadpoint

Editing your photos

Editing your photos  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. Ownership

    • I use software to add watermarks, copyrights, or signatures
    • I do other nifty things
    • I do not
  2. 2. Color/Detail

    • I modify the image to make it look more natural
    • I modify it to bring out features or details not seen in the raw photograph
    • I'll tweak the image to make up for my lack of skills
    • I do other nifty things
    • I do not
  3. 3. Special features

    • I take shots of interesting edges
    • I layer images over each other to show a die variety
    • I add images or special backgrounds
    • I do other nifty things
    • I do not


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Some of you are very proficient with your photography skills. Some are great with your computer skills.

 

How do you use software and computers to edit, fix, or display your coin/note photographs?

 

Here's the most I've done... just a better border for the coin - a simple cut and paste.

 

979194.jpg

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I don't concern myself with ownership. Photography is a hobby for me. At this point I prefer to leave my photographs without watermarks, copyrights, or signatures.

 

I really don't like the word "modify" for adjustments to make the photograph look more natural. Although modify is correct, I try to set the exposure so that the subject is captured as natural and accurate as possible with little or no modification. I usually use full manual mode because this allows me total control of depth of field and shutter speed, and use an 18% grey card to figure exposure and calibrate the white balance. While I've done stuff with Photoshop and other software to adjust poor images, I find that I get the best result with a good photograph at the camera.

 

As far as special features, I find lately that I like to use a black background, and if photographing a coin, raise it somewhere between a half and one inch off of a black felt surface with chunk of plastic cylinder as a stand, to blur the background. Although, some of the photographs here at coinpeople.com have inspired me to try some other stuff.

 

1996pennyobverseoffcenter.jpg

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depends on the coin if a error that is hard to see i will see what can be done to help people see the error,, if the coin is shiny i use a dark colored background to asorb some of the light

 

 

lighting: comes from my CFB i have in the room makes a nice lighting idea

 

Backgrounds: bits of whatever i think will help make the coin more noticed

 

i use Gimp 2 for editting the extra background out of the coin photo

 

 

 

 

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I really don't like the word "modify" for adjustments to make the photograph look more natural. Although modify is correct, I try to set the exposure so that the subject is captured as natural and accurate as possible with little or no modification. I usually use full manual mode because this allows me total control of depth of field and shutter speed, and use an 18% grey card to figure exposure and calibrate the white balance. While I've done stuff with Photoshop and other software to adjust poor images, I find that I get the best result with a good photograph at the camera.

 

 

The key point made here is that nothing substitutes for a good photograph. If its not good to begin with, there is really nothing else you can do to make it a good photograph. I also agree with "modify." Modify is a correct term, but it should not mean to correct the image of the coin for the purpose of deception. If I want to show what the obverse of a Morgan dollar looks like, I might "photoshop" out a bad scratch in front of the nose. If I want to show what MY Morgan dollar looks like, that scratch had better be untouched and visible.

 

When I edit my photos, I'm working on them for a purpose. For my database (my record keeping system), I'm satisfied with a "good" photograph. Good means in focus, reasonable color, and identifying details show if the coin is ever stolen. When I work on photographs for "show," I pull out all stops to create an image that pleases me (including composites with other images). When I create an image for publication, it has to show an accurate image of the piece. I might remove a distracting scratch if an alternative, better piece is not available to photograph. Again, in this latter instance the photograph represents a generic piece of that type, not a specific piece.

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I would be very embarrassed to share that I use a 15 year old programme that I had to convert to 64 bit to continue using - because I know the ins, outs and otherwise of it.

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I would be very embarrassed to share that I use a 15 year old programme that I had to convert to 64 bit to continue using - because I know the ins, outs and otherwise of it.

 

Why? A tool is a tool. If it works, go for it.

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i use Gimp 2 for editting the extra background out of the coin photo

Hey, another Linux user! :bthumbsup:

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I would be very embarrassed to share that I use a 15 year old programme that I had to convert to 64 bit to continue using - because I know the ins, outs and otherwise of it.

 

And yet your photos are some of the best on the forum.

 

I am still using Photoshop Elements 2 which came free with a Canon DSLR that I bought in 2004. Seven years old and still works fine. :grin:

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