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Lord's Prayer Tokens

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Three recently acquired Lord's Prayer Tokens. The smallest is 13 mm, the largest is 19 mm. The tokens in the image are shown in the correct relative size. I've linked to a fourth in my collection as shown in Omnicoin. It is 17 mm in diameter.

 

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You can see a large image at this link.

 

From the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition:

 

929998.jpg

 

The Massachusetts Bay Centenary token above came with an eagle pin. The top, Columbus, token probably had a red, white, and blue ribbon.

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Nice selection, there, Bill.

I am fortunate to have one of these myself.

 

medallion.jpg

 

It came in a Half Sovereign case and is roughly the same size of the Australian 3d.

 

comparison.jpg

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Thank you for sharing. Note the American use of "who art" versus the British "which art."

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Thank you for sharing. Note the American use of "who art" versus the British "which art."

 

All nice examples. Note also the use of ' forgive us our trespasses' versus 'forgive us our debts'. I believe one version uses 'sins'.

 

Though I was brought up using 'trespasses', in this day and age I would prefer to have my 'debts' forgiven.

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I've added a couple more Lord's Prayer medals to my collection. I either find them fascinating or I've become obsessed. You can decide for yourself.

 

The first from the 1893 Columbian Exposition shows the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia, 1832. The medal is 13 mm in diameter and the ribbn is original (to 1893).

 

955241.jpg

 

The second, also 13 mm, shows a wonderful Christmas theme, Santa ready to drop down the chimney while his reindeer and sleigh wait.

 

955242.jpg

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I've added a couple more Lord's Prayer medals to my collection. I either find them fascinating or I've become obsessed. You can decide for yourself.

 

Uhm.... I go with obsessed (case of the pot calling the kettle black I know) I can recommend a good therapist Bill, though therapy has not helped me in the least.

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I have one with the U.S. mint on it dated 1832. is that when it was made?

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These make an interesting collecting topic. I think there was an article in the Numismatist back in the late 70s.

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I have one with the U.S. mint on it dated 1832. is that when it was made?

 

No, it was made in 1893 for the World's Columbian Exposition. 1832 is the date of the second mint in Philadelphia.

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961449.jpg

 

Okay, yet another indicates a definite obsession. This one is Eglit 357. gilt, 13 mm.

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1820 Death of King George III, Great Britain.

961091.jpg

BHM 996 - 25mm - Details RRRR

 

Not nearly as clear as Bill's examples but the only one I've got. :ninja:

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Another ANA Money Show acquisition:

 

The Birth Place of Liberty (11 mm and one of my smallest)

 

961744.jpg

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A gilt-brass Lord's Prayer token in an ornate cross frame. I believe this dates to the period around World War I. The cross is marked as a product of Schwaab Stamp and Seal.

 

968610.jpg

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Three tokens acquired recently:

 

971816.jpg

 

Brooklyn Bridge / Lord's Prayer token by George Soley. 13 mm

 

971814.jpg

 

George Soley 13 mm medal struck for the World's Columbian Exposition. The Washington obverse and the Brooklyn Bridge obverse first appeared paired in 1883. It is possible the Brooklyn Bridge / Lord's Prayer medal was a Columbian piece as well. The Washington piece is cataloged as Eglit 255 and Baker 561A (Copper, Rarity 8). The Washignton / Brooklyn Bridge pair is Baker 464E.

 

971815.jpg

 

13 mm Liberty Bell / Lord's Prayer medal struck for the Columbian Exposition. Eglit 143.

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The smallest piece is just under 13 mm, but the Lord's Prayer is in yet a snaller circle:

 

971817.jpg

 

The so-called Widow's Mite is a store card for the Langdon Bakery, Cincinnati ca. 1895. On either side of the microscopic Lord's Prayer (it can be read), is the maker's mark, MM DUCK / CINCINNATI.

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I also have one that has the image of GEN. U.S. GRANT on the obverse. It too is about 13mm in diameter and holed like the othersGrant_Lords_Prayer.jpg

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I also have one that has the image of GEN. U.S. GRANT on the obverse. It too is about 13mm in diameter and holed like the others

 

Welcome to CoinPeople.

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And the obsession continues, although a little larger at 31.9 mm in brass:

 

973627.jpg

 

In general, I'm not interested in medals with lots of "real estate." Engraving small letters is not that big a deal. Engraving really, really small letters is interesting. Ward Beam's Daredevils, on the other hand, did catch my interest. The Daredevils toured the country jumping buses and other line-ups, running demolition derbies, etc. Seven stunt drivers died over the years. I believe this Whitehead-Hoag medal dates to the late 1930s based on its style.

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As long as I was adding a few odds and ends to the Lord's Prayer collection, I thought an elongated cent or two might be nice. Lo and Behold, someone (Treasure Ablbum Dist.) made a full denomination set. I'm guessing the set was made about 1968 because the half dollar is a 1967. The "Elongated Coin Story" that comes with the set states that "The Elongated Year Sets may not be one-of-a-kind, but it is a certainty that less than 200 exist in the world today." Wow. If the original purchaser had removed the coins to photograph them as I did, they would see that the half is dated 1967, the quarter 1965, the dime is hard to read, the nickel is 1961, and the cent is 1964. Not quite a year set, although they were probably all rolled in the same year. The story goes on to "promise?", "You hold a group of coins combining art, mechanical skill, religion, and ultimately financial profit." Wow! The next sentence is probably closer to the truth, "The best characteristic of the set will always be the pleasure you receive when you open the album and see your unusual set of 'Elongated coins'."

 

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Don't you just love marketing hype! For a closer look, try the large image.

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Back to the small size tokens again, this one similar to the Christmas token:

 

974498.jpg

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A few more acquisitions. The first is from Buffalo, New York for Old Home Week, September 1-7, 1907:

 

978916.jpg

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I've got two more to go after this one in the current round of purchases. Fortunately, they are small and don't take up much space. The image pictured here is from the 1909 Hudson-Fulton celebration.

 

978920.jpg

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Possibly a rare store card from Chicago. Only one other piece in my collection is a local small business token:

 

978943.jpg

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