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hiho,

 

As you know, you have a 1906 Vaud, Nyon Cantonal Schützenfest medal with a mintage of 400 pieces. It is 33 mm in size and is silver. Silver was the only metal this particualr medal was made in.

 

It is R1610 (Richter) and M964 (Martin)

 

The engraver is Alfred Jacot-Guillarmond of Le Locle

 

It's value would range (conditon range of EF to Pristine UNC) from approx. $70 - $150.00

 

You have a nice example of this schützenfest medal.

 

Thanks for the excellent information Rod, I bought this raw, NGC graded it MS64 and I completely agree.

 

One of these days I have to buy the Richter book, and retire my 1965 Krause. (Would you recommend the Martin instead of the Richter if you could only own one?)

Until then I'm counting on you to pop in to this thread from time to time and keep us all up to date.

 

And finally we know the correct spelling of Alfred Jacob-Guillarmond.

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hiho,

 

If I could only have one reference then I would purchase the Richter set. It has more content and the pictures are in color opposed to black and white as in Martin's. If cost is a deciding factor then Martin would be the way to go. Richter is the "new bible" of schutzenfest medals and rightly so.

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I thought I could post a couple of schutzenfest medals:

 

Exercices Arquebuse et Navigation, 1899, Geneve

 

Year: 1899

 

Metal: Silver

 

Size: 51mm

 

Quite rare with 5 pieces minted

 

Engraver: Hugues Bovy

 

 

m376r.jpg

 

m376o.jpg

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1887 Federal Schützenfest in Geneve

 

Mintage: 39,030 (high mintage for Swiss shooting medals, making this medal relatively common) But a beautiful example of a Schützenfest medal

 

Metal: Silver (there was also 12 example in Gold, and 4,354 examples struck in Bronze)

 

Size: 45mm (the most common size for schützenfest medals although many different sizes are struck for various medals)

 

Engraver: H. Bovy, C. Richard, E. Lossier of Genve

 

Geneve1887a.jpg

Geneve1887.jpg

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Here is another medal: Cantonal shoot in Binningen, Basel 1893

 

Mintage: 705 examples

Metal: Silver

Size: 45mm

Engraver: Franz Homberg, Bern / Karl Jauslin, Muttenz

 

Basel1893a.jpg

Basel1893.jpg

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Here's another nice medal, it is somewhat common.

 

From the 1895 Federal Shoot in Canton Zurich, Winterthur

 

Metal: Silver

 

Size: 45mm

 

Mintage: 5,060 examples

-There were 44 examples in Gold, 3,710 examples in Bronze and even a rare Gold plated Bronze version.

 

Engraver: Georges Hantz, Genf / H. Wildermuth, Winterthur

 

c6714-1.jpg

c6714r-1.jpg

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I recall seeing one of those in a recent Stack's auction. So attractive and so very tempting to bid on, because it is so lovely, but then it would open up yet another collecting venue to an already stretched ADHD collection. :ninja:

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We picked up a few medals from the recent Stacks auction I'm happy to say. The following medal was aquired by my Dad at a recent Spink auction. It is a beautiful one of a kind gold medal from Frauenfeld.

 

1890 Federal Schützenfest Thurgau, Frauenfeld

Metal: Gold

Mintage: 1 (there are 3 silver and 3 bronze examples)

Weight: 67.3 gm

Engraver: Stefano Johnson, Milano

 

1890Frauenfeld.jpg

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We picked up a few medals from the recent Stacks auction I'm happy to say. The following medal was aquired by my Dad at a recent UBS auction in Switzerland. It is a beautiful one of a kind gold medal from Frauenfeld.

 

1890 Federal Schützenfest Thurgau, Frauenfeld

Metal: Gold

Mintage: 1 (there are 3 silver, and 3 bronze examples)

Weight: 67.3 gm

Engraver: Stefano Johnson, Milano

 

1890Frauenfeld.jpg

Very impressive! :ninja:

 

Only 7 examples in all metals! Now THAT is rare!

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We picked up a few medals from the recent Stacks auction I'm happy to say. The following medal was aquired by my Dad at a recent UBS auction in Switzerland. It is a beautiful one of a kind gold medal from Frauenfeld.

 

 

Darn I have a good memory, but there were things that burned up my Stacks budget before I got to the Shooting Thalers, perhaps fortunate for you and your Dad:)

 

Besides, whilst the pieces are lovely, I realise I get too off focus with my collection :ninja:

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Scottishmoney,

 

You do have a good memory, the 1895 Winterthur was up for auction at the Satcks auction but the one I have pictured is from my collection and I have owned it for many years.

 

 

On a side bar; is the crawling bug just a gif? It is cool. :ninja:

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hiho,

 

As you know, you have a 1906 Vaud, Nyon Cantonal Schützenfest medal with a mintage of 400 pieces. It is 33 mm in size and is silver. Silver was the only metal this particualr medal was made in.

 

It is R1610 (Richter) and M964 (Martin)

 

The engraver is Alfred Jacot-Guillarmond of Le Locle

 

It's value would range (conditon range of EF to Pristine UNC) from approx. $70 - $150.00

 

You have a nice example of this schützenfest medal.

 

Thank you for the information.

 

According to Forrer, Eugene and Alfred Jacot-Guillarmond were watch case engravers (father & son) who resided in Le Locle.

 

Together, they produced a medal struck at the works of Huguenin Freres in 1888, on the inauguration of a monument at Le Locle to Daniel Jean Richard (1665-1741) who was the founder of the Neuchatel watch industry (signed E. Jacot)

 

Alfred also made a "Cantonal Rifle Meeting" of Vaud at Yverdon, 1899 (which sounds like another shooting medal).

 

I notice that this company, like Holy Freres, were watch case manufacturers. Is this generally true of the engravers of shooting medals, or just a coincidence?

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Thank you for the information.

 

According to Forrer, Eugene and Alfred Jacot-Guillarmond were watch case engravers (father & son) who resided in Le Locle.

 

Together, they produced a medal struck at the works of Huguenin Freres in 1888, on the inauguration of a monument at Le Locle to Daniel Jean Richard (1665-1741) who was the founder of the Neuchatel watch industry (signed E. Jacot)

 

Alfred also made a "Cantonal Rifle Meeting" of Vaud at Yverdon, 1899 (which sounds like another shooting medal).

 

I notice that this company, like Holy Freres, were watch case manufacturers. Is this generally true of the engravers of shooting medals, or just a coincidence?

 

 

Medals are the most prevalent award of Schützenfests although there were many other types of awards. Pokals and Bechers being another award. These are ornate goblets, cups and small cups.

 

Watches were also a popular award, although a little more rare they were prevalent thus the reason why watch case makers were also engravers of medals.

Before a schützenfest, the 'committee' would go around to local and regional shop keepers and ask for donations for the schützenfest.

 

These could be on the form of money, silver services, watches, clocks, rifles, wappensheibe, pottery, etc. Medals, Cups, and watches were the most common type of award for the higher prizes although many other type were given out and there were König prizes and special prizes.

 

Switzerland268.jpg

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Medals are the most prevalent award of Schützenfests although there were many other types of awards. Pokals and Bechers being another award. These are ornate goblets, cups and small cups.

 

Watches were also a popular award, although a little more rare they were prevalent thus the reason why watch case makers were also engravers of medals.

Before a schützenfest, the 'committee' would go around to local and regional shop keepers and ask for donations for the schützenfest.

 

These could be on the form of money, silver services, watches, clocks, rifles, wappensheibe, pottery, etc. Medals, Cups, and watches were the most common type of award for the higher prizes although many other type were given out and there were König prizes and special prizes.

 

Switzerland268.jpg

Thank you for your reply.

 

This is a most impressive display, especially the cups which can easily stand on their own as works of art. Am I correct in thinking that the 2 cups which feature a standing bear as the stem are from Bern?

 

I think the cups must be particularly rare and for so many to be present, this must be a highly advanced collection. My compliments to you (I assume these are yours) on a remarkable achievement.

 

What is a "König" prize? A grand prize reserved for the "king" of shooting competitions?

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Thank you for your reply.

 

This is a most impressive display, especially the cups which can easily stand on their own as works of art. Am I correct in thinking that the 2 cups which feature a standing bear as the stem are from Bern?

 

I think the cups must be particularly rare and for so many to be present, this must be a highly advanced collection. My compliments to you (I assume these are yours) on a remarkable achievement.

 

What is a "König" prize? A grand prize reserved for the "king" of shooting competitions?

 

 

The picture was taken two years ago when my Father and I were in Switzerland for an auction. We traveled to Bern to the Schützen Museum where I took the above photo and many more. I am lucky to have that many in my personal collection but my Father who has been collecting for over forty years has exponentially more.

 

The bears as the stems on the couple of cups you asked about are from Bern.

 

The König was the "king" of the shoot and many times was awarded some type of special award including silvered laurel wreaths.

 

 

 

Below is a watch we recently aquired. Extremely rare to find in such immaculate condition. Many times you can find a Schützenfest watch in great condition but this one is like new including the original case and paperwork.

 

Bellinzona6.jpg

Bellinzona5.jpg

Bellinzona8.jpg

Bellinzona1.jpg

Bellinzona2.jpg

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Having had the time I perused through your site in your signature, and am quite thankful which practically all of the treasures on your site have been sold :ninja:

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hiho,

 

If I could only have one reference then I would purchase the Richter set. It has more content and the pictures are in color opposed to black and white as in Martin's. If cost is a deciding factor then Martin would be the way to go. Richter is the "new bible" of schutzenfest medals and rightly so.

 

I'm going to see if my local library has either (they have a pretty decent numismatic reference section) and then probably will buy the Martin reference (if I can find one) with an eye to one day acquiring the Richter set. Maybe convince my library that the Richter set should be on their buying list so I can look it over first.

 

Do you know where these can be purchased and about what they cost? I have had no luck finding any for sale online.

 

Very nice medals you posted by the way, with great detailed photos. :ninja:

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We picked up a few medals from the recent Stacks auction I'm happy to say. The following medal was aquired by my Dad at a recent UBS auction in Switzerland. It is a beautiful one of a kind gold medal from Frauenfeld.

 

1890 Federal Schützenfest Thurgau, Frauenfeld

Metal: Gold

Mintage: 1 (there are 3 silver and 3 bronze examples)

Weight: 67.3 gm

Engraver: Stefano Johnson, Milano

 

1890Frauenfeld.jpg

 

Fantastic medal. 67 grams of gold with a mintage of one. I cannot begin to fathom what it's worth. What a prize!

The 1929 watch is a beauty too. I have seen the medal, it's fairly common, but to see the watch (and in such amazing condition) is a real treat.

 

I wish I had known that Stack's had Swiss shooting medals in their last auction... :ninja:

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I'm going to see if my local library has either (they have a pretty decent numismatic reference section) and then probably will buy the Martin reference (if I can find one) with an eye to one day acquiring the Richter set. Maybe convince my library that the Richter set should be on their buying list so I can look it over first.

 

Do you know where these can be purchased and about what they cost? I have had no luck finding any for sale online.

 

Very nice medals you posted by the way, with great detailed photos. :ninja:

 

 

hiho,

 

A Richter set is not too easy to find but I can get one from the author. With the devaluation of the US dollar to the Swiss franc the set might cost including shipping in the $175-185 range

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hiho,

 

A Richter set is not too easy to find but I can get one from the author. With the devaluation of the US dollar to the Swiss franc the set might cost including shipping in the $175-185 range

 

Can you help me purchase the Martin reference first while I save up for the Richter?

 

PLEASE...

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Can you help me purchase the Martin reference first while I save up for the Richter?

 

PLEASE...

 

 

My Father has normally had Martin books in the past but when I asked him about one for you he told me he did not have any at this time. I will look around at some of my sources and see what I can find... if I can find.

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My Father has normally had Martin books in the past but when I asked him about one for you he told me he did not have any at this time. I will look around at some of my sources and see what I can find... if I can find.

 

Thanks Rod, whatever you can do will be appreciated.

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My Father and I are going to have an auction on our web site beginning at 7:00 PM CST, May 23 and ending at 8:00 PM CST, June 1. It will be for one schützenfest medal this time. We will try to have an auction of one to multiple schützenfest items every other Friday after this first auction and always ending the following second Sunday. Mostly medals but occasionally other schützenfest items will be auctioned.

 

There is more detailed information regarding the auction as well as other schützenfest related information at the web site.

 

If you have any interest please go to our site. A link to the site is in my signature.

 

Thank you. :ninja:

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I recently bought a few shooting medals from a dealer and since I purchased four I qualified for a quantity discount, so I picked up the new Richter set, which is quite amazing and worth every penny.

 

I'll list all the medals eventually but for tonight here are two of the same medal with a slight variation.

Both are Richter catalog #420, dated 1905, from Fribourg. These are silver, 33mm, with 858 struck.

 

The first came in the display case, and is extremely toned and never cleaned. It is signed "HOLY FRERES" on the reverse, the same as the one in the Richter catalog.

 

R420-1.jpg

 

The second has very little toning, and may have been lightly cleaned at one time. This one is signed "Holy Frs", I wonder how many were produced like this?

 

R420-2.jpg

 

More as I find the time.....

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I recently bought a few shooting medals from a dealer and since I purchased four I qualified for a quantity discount, so I picked up the new Richter set, which is quite amazing and worth every penny.

 

I'll list all the medals eventually but for tonight here are two of the same medal with a slight variation.

Both are Richter catalog #420, dated 1905, from Fribourg. These are silver, 33mm, with 858 struck.

 

The first came in the display case, and is extremely toned and never cleaned. It is signed "HOLY FRERES" on the obverse, the same as the one in the Richter catalog.

 

R420-1.jpg

 

The second has very little toning, and may have been lightly cleaned at one time. This one is signed "Holy Frs", I wonder how many were produced like this?

 

R420-2.jpg

 

More as I find the time.....

Nice medals hiho.

 

Die variations are not entirely unusual with Swiss shooting medals. There are a number of examples of medals with die variations. More than likely R420's die broke or became unusable and a second die had to be utilized and its reverse was slightly different. Again, not too unusual but having the 2 different die varieties is a plus.

 

And I see you got a Ricther book. I hope you enjoy the book, as you stated it is very nice and an excellant reference.

 

I will be interested in seeing the other 2 you procured.

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