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International Inventions & Music Exhibition, London. 1885


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Obv. INTERNATIONAL INVENTIONS EXHIBITION. LONDON. 1885. NEAL.

Rev. View of a London street. YE OLDE LONDON STREETE.

BHM#3197 RRR. 33mm WM. by R. Neal

 

Curiously BHM makes no mention of the monogram on the reverse, which is 'HMR' for the publisher of the medal, Herbert M. Rombach of 21 Spring Street, Paddington, London. Medal Stamper who had stand #13(which was one of the houses of the 'Old London Streete) in the exhibition, where this and one other medal was struck; "the machinery for the manufacturing thereof in motion"

 

The exhibition was opened by the Prince of Wales on 4th May 1885. It closed on 9th November 1885, some 3,760,581 people admitted; the total receipts were 214,403 GBP.

 

The central object in the street scene is a water conduit known as the "Standard upon Cornhill" the houses were faithful recreations of actual 'old London houses' and housed exhibitors. The clock is mounted on the 'Church Tower' LINK TO CATALOGUE of the Exhibition.

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The exhibition was opened by the Prince of Wales on 4th May 1885. It closed on 9th November 1885, some 3,760,581 people admitted; the total receipts were 214,403 GBP.

 

Wow! I'm surprised that in the span of that exhibition only two different medals were minted.

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Wow! I'm surprised that in the span of that exhibition only two different medals were minted.

 

There were only 2 designs of medals struck by Herbert M. Rombach both listed as RRR (extremely rare) but there was one other by L. C. Wyon listed as C (common) for a grand total of 3, which appears to be a small number but in reality most of the international exhibitions in that period (1851-1900) only had 1-4 different medals struck. The most notable exceptions being the 1851 'Great Exhibition' with at least 53, including prize & service medals etc, and the 1862 'International' with at least 40, including prize & service medals etc.

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A very pleasant street scene. It reminds me of Guildford high street;

 

That is damned close. Maybe the English had only one street designer at the time? Or maybe the medal encouraged others to copy the London scene! Just kidding of course, but it is a close match.

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How old is that row of houses?

 

Guildford High Street has a plethora of ages represented. Right from Late Norman buildings at one end, 17th Century architecture at the other and mostly Tudor in the middle. The buildings in the photo above are mostly late 16th Century with a couple being a generation or so earlier.

 

 

That is damned close. Maybe the English had only one street designer at the time? Or maybe the medal encouraged others to copy the London scene! Just kidding of course, but it is a close match.

 

Many English market towns featured very similar designs. As the High Streets developed in the 16th and 17th Centuries so did the architecture and many architects had a similar vision of how a High Street should look. It is marvellous that you can do your shopping in such an area and I can withdraw money from a cash machine inside a Tudor building!! :ninja:

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Guildford High Street has a plethora of ages represented. Right from Late Norman buildings at one end, 17th Century architecture at the other and mostly Tudor in the middle. The buildings in the photo above are mostly late 16th Century with a couple being a generation or so earlier.

 

Standing and functional buildings older than the oldest English settlement in America. Mind-boggling.

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Standing and functional buildings older than the oldest English settlement in America. Mind-boggling.

 

You will like this site LINK YORK 360 try this, especially the movies I know you will like what you see. Some of the buildings are from before America was 'discovered' I know it was never really lost!

QUICK LINK TO A MOVIE click and drag panoramic.

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  • 1 month later...

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This must be an extremely rare hand engraved silver brooch/pin-back 38mm, hallmarked for 1885(L) Birmingham, for G. Loveridge & Co of Spencer Street, Birmingham, England.
Further research shows that the Ye Olde London streete was constructed for the Health Exhibition in 1884 & re-used for the 1885 Inventions & Music Exhibition.
In the catalogue it states that the streete was originally planked for the 1884 exhibition but was cobbled for the 1885 exhibition. The brooch shows what appears to be a planked streete whereas the medal clearly shows cobbles.
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"The plank flooring which covered the roadway last year, time not allowing of Mr. Birch's original idea for a pavement being carried out, has been replaced—under the direction of Mr. Wilson Bennison, architect and surveyor to the Council—by an appropriate pavement in imitation of the old style cobble stones and bricks which greatly adds to the antique appearance of the whole of the surroundings. Although the buildings remain substantially as in last year, improved access and means of communication with other parts of the Exhibition have been established.

The street is now illuminated at night by electricity, thus avoiding the necessity of closing it at dusk, as was the case last year. Both arc and crystal glow lamps are used; of the former kind, five Mackie lamps of 2500-candle-power each are so arranged as to produce the picturesque effect of moonlight in the street and narrow lane and alleys, while the shops and rooms upstairs are lit with 300 incandescent lamps by Crompton & Co., from two dynamos supplied by a 45-horse power Willan's high-speed engine"

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