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syzygy

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Posts posted by syzygy

  1. 6img7318.jpg

     

    Another snag from circulation last week - misaligned reverse die. Notice the slightly off center - but only the reverse. Definitely not a collar error but a misaligned die. Small enough to notice and large enough to keep - hey it's not much of an investment risk :ninja:

  2. 4img7313.jpg

     

    Got this one in change the other day. It's a suprisingly strong strike. So many of the clad roosies seem to be weakly struck. Especially noticeable as the last digit of the date disappears into the rim. Not so with this one - wish I could have snagged it fresh out of a roll.

  3. I have received a few of these in the last week or so from different places. It's actually a very nice design. I wonder if they will produce copper proofs - probably get one if they do.

     

    1img7351.jpg

     

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  4. Here is the link to the PCGS news release -> LINK

     

    I am not interested in commenting on the particulars of the law suit with regard to the people or the legal positions. But one aspect of the the issue, in general, is certainly notable and alarming. Essentially, the claim seems to be that coins were altered in a very sophisticated manner and submitted to PCGS for authentication. New steps are being implemented to detect alterations...from the news release..."Using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), Fournier [sIC] Transform Infra-Red Spectral analysis (FT-IR), Raman Spectroscopy and other similar analytical techniques, this detection process (code-named by PCGS the PCGS Coin Sniffer™) will analyze the surfaces of a coin in a matter of seconds to detect foreign substances and provide quantitative information about the coin."

     

    Look, I know that forgery and doctoring has always been been around with coin collecting - there is no news there. What saddens me is the realization that doctoring is advancing further and faster than I can keep up with ("Their methods included lasering the surfaces of extremely rare proof gold coins to remove surface imperfections, building up commonly-worn or weakly-struck portions of coins, and other physical and chemical processes.").

  5. Recently a guy came to the forgerylist complaining that he bought a coin that had been reconstructed using plastic. Here are the images:

     

    /**/

     

    In one soak a very expensive coin turned into a not so expensive coin for the unsuspecting buyer. It seems this is not that terribly rare. Seems easier to do an make it look convincing than to retool.

     

    This is really amazing to me and thanks much for the posting. On the one hand, I am very impressed by the degree of retooling done with the adulterant - that lettering that is presumed to be artificial fits very well to my eyes and some of it is almost entirely 'plastic'. The areas in the second coin where you see the divots after the acetone look somewhat suspicious in the 'before' picture (of course, it's easy to be suspicious when you look at the after picture).

     

    Can we completely rule out effects of the acetone? I know acetone *should* not react with copper and this gets tossed around from time to time on the boards, with some swearing that acetone has messed up their copper (nothing like this case though). I have had the experience of acetone mottling the surface luster/toning on a Lincoln before see Evil Acetone Definitely nothing like we see in your pics - but could acetone do a number on patina?

     

    Also, can we rule out that the dip was not something else (such as a diluted acid which is typically contained in silver dips)?

     

    Looks like a putty job, but I am still curious - does anyone else know more about such matters?

  6. ....hubby says it looks too precise for a grinding wheel.

     

    It definitely looks like it was done after minting. Not sure I can even speculate on what tools/techniques were used to do a radial waffling like that - looks cool for sure, but not a mint error, IMO.

  7. Usually, I do not bother with these massive spammings that sometimes occur - but I see so many today that I am prompted to write. In case somebody gets fooled - please do not respond to these kinds of innapropriate messages and I strongly advise folks NOT to click on links contained in these innapropriate spam messages.

     

    A moderator will likely come by to clean up, until then I say it is best to simply ignore them *sigh*

  8. It is, indeed, a shield nickel. It is almost impossible to judge the condition from your pics, but it does look like there is a lot of detail - maybe even mint luster - as do many of the other coins in the pic, like the Liberty and Bison nickels next to it. It would be a good idea to leave them be until you can figure out what you have. Please don't handle them or clean them or anything like that.

     

    To answer your question directly - if it looks in mint condition, you certainly might consider getting it graded - cost would be something like $25 or so, depending.

  9. First of all I'm new to Coin People and I would like to introduce myself as a casual collector. I have a friend whose Dad passed away not long ago and he left her quite a large coin collection. Anyway I was helping her go through this collection when we came across this 1909 S VDB in his penny collection. I've never seen one in person before but I told her that I would find out what it might be worth. After searching the net I see that there are many counterfeit varieties out there. So now I'm wondering if it's real or that maybe he was using it to fill a hole.

    Take a look at the pictures that I've provided and let me know what you think. As you will notice the last T in Trust in very weakly struck. Well anyway I look forward to hearing from you folks and thanks.

     

    The links are the full obverse and reverse of the coin.

     

    [/---/

     

    Hi tarsdaddy and welcome.

     

    I am also a casual collector, and yours is an exciting and intriguing find! Of course, one obvious thing to do would be to have it sent for certification and, as you noted forom doing some research on the net, there are a ton of counterfeits out there.

     

    I am going to go out on a limb and say that this is NOT a genuine 09-s vdb and that it is probably an 09 vdb with an added mint mark. This is based on:

     

    The crossbar of the B in vdb is not slanted as on the genuine, that looks clear to me.

     

    There are 4 mintmark placements and only one where the s is low like yours but it looks like the placement relative to the 0 is close but not like the originals - that looks a little off.

     

    It's difficult to tell from the picture, but it looks like some of the surface area around the mintmark is discontinuous from the surrounding area of the coin - like some work had been done around there.

     

    That is my two cents and I definitely could be wayyyy off. I hope some others will give their opinions because I really like this kind of topic. Lost Dutchman was excellent with this stuff - hey LD, you around??

  10. I have not been to the Baltimore show in a long time and I kept the little postcard for this Thur when it starts, but I doubt I will make it. I think my strategy is somewhere in between well planned and focused and kid-in-a-candy-store. If I am looking for one high priced coin (and to me that means $150) then I have been there and literally covered every dealer there for that coin. Other times I just browse until I am weary - then go to the lobby for a cup of coffee and then head back in for another hour or so. One thing I do like to do is to take my check lists because shows are a great place to catch album fills.

     

    Be sure to let us know how you did.

  11. I completely missed the original post and likely I would not have understood it at the time. But, since then, I saw a bumch of episodes during one of those 'marathons' where they show the whole season. I really liked it and thought it was funny and very entertaining. There was one bit with some fractional currency and, as I recall, he was psyched that he was getting a Ben Franklin signed note and it turned out that another, lesser known, signature made the note very desireable.

     

    The star is a very likeable sort and the show does a lot to combat any sleazy image connected with pawn shops. It is also notable that the guy has an entire network of consultants, and seems to know a heck of a lot himself.

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