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captaincoffee

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Posts posted by captaincoffee

  1. Thanks for the info...I thought it must be something like that. I just got back from Cambodia and bought a bunch of banknotes there. One of the old 500 Riel bills looks like like it could be in a series with this note because of the same small yellow boxed fields in the corners that repeat the serial number and denomination. I'll have to check to see if they were printed at the same place in France. I'll post some pics when I get a chance.

  2. Looking for someone with knowledge of French banknotes to help me with a question. I know that many of the French notes have a slight ripple in the paper, but the issues I have of this note also all have a pinhole or two in the watermark field (as shown in picture).

    10francsarrows.JPG

    Recently, I saw someone selling some of these bills on eBay and those notes also had the pinholes in the same area. I have 5 sequentially numbered bills like this, so I now believe they must have been issued this way. Can anyone confirm if all these notes are like this or just some and what caused it? Thanks.

    Dave

  3. Didn't really expect anything special. Just got them to waste some time over spring break.

    I know it's been 14 years since I did spring break in college, but I think you are missing the point.

  4. I think the short term price pressure on gold and silver is going to bring it up a bit more over the next year--let's guess 5%. However, I think in the mid-term (3-5 year) we will see about a 20% price correction downwards. Long-term (10 year) is a real guessing game since it is so dependant on other factors, but I expect it will climb back slowly after a price correction to about 10% above where it is today. Personally, I've only heard $1000 price predictions from folks that stand to make a lot of money if it comes true. Now, if the US housing market bubble bursts in the next year or two, it will be interesting to see if folks start selling-off or hoarding.

  5. OK. Here's a question....on the coin collecting side, we often discuss cleaning, dipping, artificial toning, etc. While we agree that these are all bad for the coin, we also use some of those or alternate techniques (ie. acetone) under certain circumstances. I've never thought of this with banknotes, but I recently found a bunch of notes that I folded into origami swans years ago. Unfortunately, I also realized that I misplaced the nice duplicate ones in my collection. So, are there good ways to help a note straighten itself out with minimal damage vs. bad ways (like wetting it and pulling out the iron)? If anyone has good ideas, I'd like to try them out. I was thinking about steam to relax the crisp folds and then sticking it in a book for a month, but I'm sure someone here is a lot more clever than I am.

    BTW, before anyone says it...I'm not talking about improving a note and then trying to sell it for a higher grade. I'm also not talking about my nice stuff. We're talking about some cheap face-value notes (~.25-.50) that are all crumpled up and I don't feel like buying again. Thanks.

    Dave

  6. I would have a little pity if he agreed to pull the images. But considering his response to you, I hope he doesn't notice until the auction is over. By the way, poor kids in the ghetto don't have Napoleonic medals. It would be nice if they did, but they just don't.

     

    "Gee, I really thought my medal would go for more than that....wait a minute....What!!....why you &*%#$......"

     

    A classic (both the medal and your response). By the way, if you don't want people doing this to you, you really shouldn't have such nice stuff.

  7. Birth year sets are great gifts. I don't normally collect proof sets, but whenever someone in my family or a close friend has a baby, I always put aside a set for them. I figure it will make for an easy birthday present at some time in the future. If I don't complement you on the gold purchases, it's just because I'm jealous.

  8. I think you'll find that the standard catalogs are pretty much indispensable. Not only are they good for identification, but they allow you to see what else is out there and how you might want to shape your collection in the future. Of course, that's a double-edged sword. You can't spend money on something if you didn't know it was out there in the first place. If you don't need the latest info on price and new releases, you can buy a used edition from a couple years ago for a lot less than the new one. There is a 1961-date and pre-1961 edition that you might want to consider. They may have them at your local library too.

     

    Welcome to the site. Just do whatever Tiff says and you'll be fine.

  9. I agree, except that I would recommend you make sure to use a D-ring 3-ring binder where the rings attach to the back of the binder and not the spine. A regular 3-ring binder will not allow the pages to lie flat and will slide and pinch the pages when you open and close it.

    I use currency sleeves to place the notes in, then slip them into the pocketed currency pages. I think I made my last purchase from www.brent-krueger.com, but there are plenty of other suppliers online.

    For the notes larger than 3.5x8 (the "large" sleeves and pockets), I use the archival sheet protectors like superbeast. However, they are pretty thin and the bills move around and bend when you flip the pages...still looking for a better solution there.

  10. My guess is that the FLEC may have produced this currency as part of its independance campaign against Angola. Not sure you could spend it anywhere. Pretty sad story, and a pretty nasty place to be. It is one of the less publicized stories of African politics/war/atrocities, but I suppose things have to be beyond awful to get much press when you are in competition with the horrors in neighboring countries.

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