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nutmegcollector

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About nutmegcollector

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  1. In your case, the USD100,000 is a copy of a genuine note; 1 million euro is a fantasy note, genuine ones never exist.
  2. A Woman to replace Andrew Jackson on U. S. $20 bills? A campaign to put a woman on an American banknote in 2020 on the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment that granted women the right to vote. The plan calls for Andrew Jackson, a president maligned for his treatment of Native Americans, to be removed from the $20 bill. A shortlist of 15 women to replace him has been drawn up, and a final nominee will be voted for by the public online, on womenon20s.org, before President Obama is asked to make the change. http://nutmegcollector.blogspot.com/2015/03/a-woman-to-replace-andrew-jackson-on-u.html
  3. Cash register has only 4 compartments for bills. It's up to the restore owner to consign their use. I do believe they are usually consigned to $1, $5, $10 and $20 bills Anybody ever received a $2 bill in change at a store? I have never see one in circulation. Same go for $1 coins, hardly see them in circulation.
  4. There are $2 FRNs, first printed in 1976 to celebrate the U. S. Bicentennial. The most recent is series 2003. They are just not popular. Some people save them, believing they are rare. Some stores reluctant to take them. Cash register was invented in 1883. The design of the cash drawer itself has not changed since its invention back in 1883. Small compartments in the front are for coins. The larger compartments behind the coin compartments are intended to hold one-, five-, 10-, and 20-dollar bills. Cashiers typically hide larger bills under the cash drawer.
  5. $2 redesign is not considered because US $2 bills are not popular. Cash registers only have slots for $1, $5, $10 and $20 bills.
  6. http://nutmegcollector.blogspot.com/2015/03/canadian-star-trek-fans-have-been.html
  7. See my blog on the same fictional notes http://nutmegcollector.blogspot.com/2014/10/us-currency-reimagined-to-celebrate.html Here are another interesting proposed designs for US $1, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 http://nutmegcollector.blogspot.com/2010/08/what-would-it-take-to-redesign-american.html
  8. Surprise! The one on the left graded PCGS Gem 65 PPQ. Auction house estimated its value at $400-$800. Sold for $300. The one one the right auction house graded Ch. CU and estimated at $100-$200. Sold for $80.
  9. In the International Paper Money Show in Memphis June 12-15, 2014, two U. S. 3 Cents 1863 notes were sold in the auction. One was Graded PCGS Gem 65 PPQ and sold for $300. The other graded Ch. CU sold for $80. Can anybody guess which one worth more and why?
  10. I'm 100% certain all the $100,000 gold certificates out there are fakes. There is no chance anybody ever get hold of a genuine one.
  11. See my blog on this note. http://nutmegcollector.blogspot.com/2010/04/100000-gold-certificate-1934-real-or.html
  12. See my website on this topic http://tomchao.com/eu/gb4.html
  13. China P-M28 100 Yen (1945) Japanese occupation military note. Although issued for all occupied China, these notes were replaced by Federal Reserve and Cenral Reserve Bank of China issues (puppet banks). However, they did remain in circulation in Hong Kong and Hainan Island through the occupation. Four red Japanese characters overprinted across center front and back: "Military Note". Seven red characters overprinted below: Japanese Imperial Government".
  14. Yes, it is. It reads "Heilongjiang Province Food Coupon" on the top
  15. Constellation Numismatics specializes in U. S. error notes. http://www.errorcurrency.com/default.aspx
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