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Russian coins


Hussulo
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You got good eyes there Hussulo. Indeed all of them are Russian coins.

 

The first coin there is the 20th Anniversary from the liberation of Facist Germany and if I am not wrong, is the first Soviet commemorative coin minted for a long time ever since 1914.

 

The second coin is a 5 kopek minted in 1860 in Ekaterinburg mint. I personally call it the electrified eagle because of it's sharp design :ninja: And yes, feel the size of that coin :lol:

 

And lastly is a coin minted in 1840 in Sestrostrk Mint, which is not a common mint.

 

Value wise, which I am sure you are keen to know - well I am merely estimating, which is as follows: 0.50 pound, 4 pound, 2-3 pound, although these days, prices on eBay have been skyrocketing to some insane prices that I cannot keep track...

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post-1009-1150565827.jpg

 

This ruble commemorates the 20th anniversary of victory over fascist Germany.

 

Notice that the heroic figure with the great broadsword protects and comforts a child while standing on the smashed remains of a swastika. There's not much room for doubt about what that means. :ninja:

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Here's a BabelFish translation of http://mint.hobby.ru/pm_001.htm which describes the coin and gives a bit more information.

 

It's a rough translation, but good enough to be understood.

 

1. Anniversary coin by merit 1 ruble is released in the rotation on 28 April, 1965, in the commemoration of the 20- anniversary of the victory above Fascist Germany in the World War II 1941-1945.

 

Face side (avers)

 

In the upper part the image of the state coat of arms of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, under it the figured feature, along both sides of which the inscription OF THE "USSR", on two letters from each side. In the lower part the inscription "ONE RUBLE", which designates the merit of coin and located into two lines: upper is horizontal, lower in a semicircle. In the circle ornament from the points and the coming out edging. Images, inscription and points are relief.

 

Wrong side (reverse)

 

In the center the image of the monument of the sculptor OF E.V. Of vucheticha to soldier- liberator, established in the Berlin Treptov- park in GDR, which is framed in the circle by inscription "VICTORY ABOVE FASCIST GERMANY". In the middle part with the number "XX" and by the inscription OF "YEARS", located respectively to the left and to the right of the image of monument, is determined the anniversary release date of coin. In the circle the coming out edging. Image and inscriptions are relief.

 

Side (drove)

 

Has inscriptions "9 MAY 1965" and "ONE RUBLE", divided by two asterisks. Inscriptions and asterisk deepened.

 

 

Diameter: 31 mm. thickness on the edge: 1,9 mm. the mass: 9,85 g.

 

Metal: the cupronickel alloy of white color.

 

Print run: in all - 60 million. pcs, including of improved quality of 11,25 thousand pcs.

 

Artists: face side - N.A. Sokolov, wrong side - A.V. Kozlov. Author of the modelling: A.V. Kozlov.

 

Coin is coined on the Leningrad mint.

 

In 1988 the repeated coinage of coin with the analogous figures on the face and wrong sides is realized. The side of coin has inscriptions: "9 MAY 1965", "1988", that designates new yr of coinage, and the letter of "N", which are divided by two asterisks and point. Inscriptions, asterisk and point deepened. Thickness on the edge: 2,3 mm the mass: 12,8 g the print run: 55 thousand pcs coin is coined on the Leningrad mint.

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I like it too, Hussulo.

 

That's a coin I think I'd like in proof, but I don't know if any proofs of it exist, so I guess a business strike might be the only real option.

 

Proofs of this issue do exist. It is unclear if the "original" proofs date from 1965, as some suppose, or more likely from the late 1970s when coins were being struck for sale to visitors at the 1980 Moscow Olympics. These originals are scarce but do show up on occasion. The scarcest, by far, of the original proofs is the 1970 Lenin birth centennial. The common Olympic roubles also exist in proof, with the 1978 Kremlin piece being the most difficult to find.

 

The 1965 rouble was also struck in proof for the 1988 novodel series; it has "1988 H" on the edge as an easy marker for identification. These are not too difficult to find (55,000 novodel sets were made) though I have not seen all that many in the last year or two. For some unknown reason the 1970 Lenin rouble was not restruck in proof for the 1988 set.

 

As proof-likes are common for these roubles, it is sometimes necessary to look closely at the fields (which should be perfect on the proofs) to make certain which is which. The proofs are generally cameo, the proof-likes are not.

 

RWJ

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Proofs of this issue do exist. It is unclear if the "original" proofs date from 1965, as some suppose, or more likely from the late 1970s when coins were being struck for sale to visitors at the 1980 Moscow Olympics. These originals are scarce but do show up on occasion. The scarcest, by far, of the original proofs is the 1970 Lenin birth centennial. The common Olympic roubles also exist in proof, with the 1978 Kremlin piece being the most difficult to find.

 

The 1965 rouble was also struck in proof for the 1988 novodel series; it has "1988 H" on the edge as an easy marker for identification. These are not too difficult to find (55,000 novodel sets were made) though I have not seen all that many in the last year or two. For some unknown reason the 1970 Lenin rouble was not restruck in proof for the 1988 set.

 

As proof-likes are common for these roubles, it is sometimes necessary to look closely at the fields (which should be perfect on the proofs) to make certain which is which. The proofs are generally cameo, the proof-likes are not.

 

RWJ

 

 

Thank you for this useful information. I don't know much about the Soviet issues, being more familiar with the Imperial series (which seems to form the bulk of the Russian coin market).

 

I like this coin and the story behind it. The erection of the monument shown gives some sense of the impact of the war on Russia. I had assumed the monument was in Russia and was intrigued to learn today that it was actually erected in a park in East Berlin instead. Given the enormous suffering of Russians during the Nazi occupation, the choice of East Berlin as the site for the monument is not so surprising.

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There is some interesting information about the 1965 normal vs novodel proof coin.

 

http://shiraliv.narod.ru/Vyp_1.htm

 

Another interesting controversial discussion is about the 1970 lenin ruble is whether a medal die was used to strike the proof-like / proof coins

 

http://shiraliv.narod.ru/Vyp_3.htm

Thanks for the link to this interesting website ... unfortunately, the host seems to be on a dial-up connection or something utilizing pre-1950's Soviet telephone technology, probably from somewhere in Siberia (one of the authors is in Kemerovo) ... (it's SSSLLLOOOOOOOOOWWWWW).

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