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A Study In Modern Chop Marks


LostDutchman
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that would of course be the easiest thing to do.... No I just have noticed them before and I thought it might be neat to document them and see if I ever got 2 that were the same...and If I was ever able to identify them. I have never seen anything done on them before...but I didn't really dig that far. And as seeing how about 1 out of every 5-7 $100 bills I look has at least one (if not 3 or 4) I thought it mike make an intresting research topic

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I have a $5 US Bill with "Hotel International, Karachi" (Pakistan), stamped on it, and several Hong Kong notes from one collection with a red "Kuang" stamped on the top right margin of the back, as well as Chinese notes of several denominations which have stamped characters, including one counterfeit with a stamped character.

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  • 1 year later...
just wanted to add a few more ;)

54l3608.jpg

 

5y9eelf.jpg

 

4xxgqs8.jpg

 

6exwq4y.jpg

 

Great to see that you are still hot in collecting these interesting chop marks. :ninja:;)

 

One interesting question I have. What happen if we use these ink chop to chop them on polymer banknotes.

I believe the ink will run.

 

They will need to use a permanent ink for chopping them on the polymer notes.

 

;)

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who knows where most of these chop marks come from.... i wish i did

jos is the countermark an asian looking symbol???

 

Well, I take that as the official request then :ninja:

 

Yes it is:

 

tradedollar%20-%20countermarked.jpg

tradedollar%20-%20countermarkeda.jpg

tradedollar%20-%20countermarkedb.jpg

 

Looks familiar? Similar?

 

 

Regards,

 

Jos

 

PS: Placed this coin in the British Coin Forum too: http://www.coinpeople.com/index.php?showtopic=14968

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  • 7 months later...
This one was handed to me in my exchange shop.

 

I count 5 on this one. Not a record, but maybe some new ones? If so, let me know, and I will mail you a scan in higher resolution. (if you want the note, that is also possible!)

 

Regards,

 

Jos

 

I can't read arabic caligraphy very well. So I don't know what the top left blue one says. I can't see the other two left ones very well. The top right one I can kind of make out but still am not sure. The black one looks like "Al shamree" or some mix of Al - sh - m - r - ee.

 

But I bet all of you can prove me wrong.

 

 

 

I'll give you $75 for the note, Jos.

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The first poster says that someone will mark the bill so in case it is stolen, you can identify it. That makes no sense because at some point, the person that marked it will spend it. Then it is not his anymore. Could he spend it, then claim it was stolen? Makes no sense.

 

Another poster says that money exchangers chop them after they determine they are genuine, so if they get them again, they don't have to spend time verifying they are genuine. Again, this makes no sense. You almost never get the same bill twice.

 

A poster on page 2 says they are marked to prove they are genuine. How would a chop mark prove they are genuine? If someone would make a fake bill, wouldn't they chop it as well? Makes no sense.

 

I have not yet heard a good reason online for the these marks. One person I work with said that sometimes, Asian people take bills to the temples to be blessed and then the monk or priest or whatever will stamp them to show they were blessed. But if you were a monk, would you use a Winnie the Pooh saying SORRY stamp? Not likely. Makes no sense.

 

I tried to attach a photo of some chops or whatever that I have, but I don't know how to make the photo under 100k in size. :(

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Welcome to the forum Gary55379.

I myself do not collect chop notes, but what you say makes a lot of sense.

 

Have you read the boards concerning uploading images on threads they maybe useful to you, I am looking forward to seeing your chop notes.

 

Good luck.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, I may have an explanation for the Chinese characters on dollar bill. I recently visited a Chinese money changer in Singapore (in order to get some unc. bills of East Asien countries). When I arrived, he was counting a thick bundle of 10 US $ bills. When he had ended counting he wrapped the notes with a rubber band, took a kind of stamp out of a drawer in front of him and marked the uppermost note with the Chinese Character 唐 (Tang). I asked him why he did this. His anwer: “that means that the bundle is counted and I can guarantee that there are exactly 100 bills in the bundle”. – His family name (姓) was „Tang“.

 

As for the two Chinese characters shown here the first one is 華 (hua). This character means „magnificent, plentiful“ and also can mean –as someone told us already- „China“ – 北華 (beihua) is North China etc. But “hua” is also a family name. – As the old character 華 and not the modern character 华 is used, this note must have been chopmarked somewhere outside mainland China where only the simplified characters are used.

 

The 2nd character is certainly 雪 (xue). (Someone had read this character already, he says “shue” which is roughly the pronunciation of the characters, but the official Pinyin romanization requires “xue”). This cannot be a family name, but it can be a personal name. Personal names are used if there are several persons with the same family name are working in one exchange bureau (they are often relatives of each other).

 

Well what I am telling here is only valid for the Chinese chopmarks. It may also be valid for the words written in Arabic script. I have, however, no idea why the other marks like Winni the Pooh are on the notes…

 

Erwin

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Was looking for answers as to why my bills had stamps on them and came across this forum. Interesting info to help fill my curiosity. Here are a few pics of the stamps I've collected (I've also received the parrot stamp). Wish I knew what each stamp represented. My Uncle also shared this link with me as another possible explanation for some of the stamps. http://en.m.wikipedi.../Stamp_Stampede

chop3.jpg

chop2.jpg

chop1.jpg

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Was looking for answers as to why my bills had stamps on them and came across this forum. Interesting info to help fill my curiosity. Here are a few pics of the stamps I've collected (I've also received the parrot stamp). Wish I knew what each stamp represented. My Uncle also shared this link with me as another possible explanation for some of the stamps. http://en.m.wikipedi.../Stamp_Stampede

 

Very interesting subject. Welcome to CoinPeople. I hope that this thread continues as these seem to be more common now than ever. A fellow at the local coin club was commenting on 50 and 100 dollar bills with small stamps. Supposedly they are drug-dealer identification marks. Similar to what they put on some of their products. Not sure I believe that one but in some ways it makes sense.

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