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I've been playing with dipping cents in tobasco to remove gunk, etc.

 

Works well with newer cents already mostly red, but if left in the sauce too long they will stain an ugly pinkish. Trust me, I have a pile of them.

 

So I put a clock to about 40 of them and worked down from 60 seconds.

 

You got 5 seconds, anything longer = visible pink. Degree of pink varied, intuitively, more time in = more pink.

 

Squirt about 3 shakes into a bowl. Flip in cent face down. Shake a bit (like your panning for gold). "One-one thousand, two-two thousand",, remove quickly and flip on reverse "three-three thousand",, shake "four four-thousand",, remove and softly rub dry (i use a soft rag),, "five five-thousand",,, flush coins with hot water for about 20-30 seconds and pat dry.

5 seconds is measured from the time the coin hits the sauce to the time it's placed under hot running water.

 

Does a very nice job,,, but you must be brief. Not sure what combination of ingredients in tobasco work the magic (vinegar, pepper oils, etc.). The stuff works almost instantly, and goes south that quick too if you leave it in only seconds too long.

 

After optimizing the process I used it on 2 gunked up 2000 wide am cents I pulled from circulation ,,, I can no longer tell them apart from some of the bu one's I have,, color's are identical.

 

* note - I wouldn't use this on anything I wasn't ready to throw away... cleaning/dipping coins is always a bad idea if they are of significant value.

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It's the vinegar. Go get yourself a new roll of pennies from the bank, drop them into apple cider vinegar for about 5 minutes, let them dry, and take them back to the bank. Tell them you think they may be counterfeit or something and ask for a new roll :ninja: It's worth wasting a few cents of vinegar just to see the tellers face :lol:

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It is indeed interesting what will happen. I have tried with copper coins that looked somewhat unc with brown tarnish and depending on the alloy, and how fast you deal with it, it may look like a brilliant UNC overall. But overtime, they have a tendency to tone back VERY fast, unless you stop the oxidation right away, probably with a layer of varnish as a final resort.

 

As for a test, I had a corroded 1793 5 kopek coin dipped in soy sauce for a good one week. Result was, it was extremely red, like the picture here to suggest, but it turned brown over a week.

 

905441.jpg

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It is indeed interesting what will happen. I have tried with copper coins that looked somewhat unc with brown tarnish and depending on the alloy, and how fast you deal with it, it may look like a brilliant UNC overall. But overtime, they have a tendency to tone back VERY fast, unless you stop the oxidation right away, probably with a layer of varnish as a final resort.

 

As for a test, I had a corroded 1793 5 kopek coin dipped in soy sauce for a good one week. Result was, it was extremely red, like the picture here to suggest, but it turned brown over a week.

 

905441.jpg

 

 

Eeegads, don't abuse this any further, please send to me for safe keeping :ninja:

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It's a variation of "dipping" that does, in fact, destroy the surface metal and the lustre of uncirculated coins. The "pinkish" color you get is a result of that tiny bit of surface being removed by the acidic elements in the solution, whether it's ketchup, Tabasco sauce, Taco Bell taco sauce, vinegar, or whatever. You get the same effects by dipping copper coins into Jewelustre or any equivalent commercial tarnish remover. Using any of this stuff on circulated copper makes the coin look unoriginal because it will remove any natural toning in addition to the "gunk".

 

I strongly suggest the use of either Acetone or xylene in lieu of any of the other stuff for the removal of gunk, biologicals (finger oils, etc.) because neither product will damage the surface of the metal.

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