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Tauric Coinage


gxseries

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Guaranteed rare, or actually UNHEARD OF!!!

 

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Tauric Mint, if I am not wrong is at the Southern end of Ukraine, (am I close enough Dave?) and they actually temporarily minted the massive 5 kopeks in 1787 amd 1788 under the mintmark TM. Unfortunately, the mint shut down right away, as their qualities were totally "crap".

 

Who knew that they minted their own unique silver coinages too :ninja:

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Tauric Mint, if I am not wrong is at the Southern end of Ukraine, (am I close enough Dave?) and they actually temporarily minted the massive 5 kopeks in 1787 amd 1788 under the mintmark TM. Unfortunately, the mint shut down right away, as their qualities were totally "crap".

 

Who knew that they minted their own unique silver coinages too :cry:

I didn't, but they are listed in Uzdenikov and Rylov/Sobolin as well as the other sources listed on the website which I don't have -- although I just won the Bitkin reference on a CD-ROM in an eBay auction...can't wait to see what that is like! :ninja:

 

(I wasted about 20 minutes looking all over my Brekke until I realized that it's a silver coin! ;) )

Thanks, gxseries -- I learned something new today! :lol:

 

The 20 kopeek issue was the most common of all of the Tauric silver series. Pricing information, according to Rylov/Sobolin, is quoted at about 1/2 of what a 1912 commemorative "Славный Годъ" rubel would be (or was, at the time the Sobolin catalog was written). There are no mintage numbers given. Who knows what they are really worth???

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Who knew that they minted their own unique silver coinages too :ninja:

 

I did. There was one (20kop.) for sale at Holmasto's auction a few years ago.

Interesting, but quite expensive coins. :lol: If I remember correctly, the price was about 800 euros.

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  • 4 months later...
Guaranteed rare, or actually UNHEARD OF!!!

 

Link

 

Tauric Mint, if I am not wrong is at the Southern end of Ukraine, (am I close enough Dave?) and they actually temporarily minted the massive 5 kopeks in 1787 amd 1788 under the mintmark TM. Unfortunately, the mint shut down right away, as their qualities were totally "crap".

 

Who knew that they minted their own unique silver coinages too :ninja:

 

The Tauric (or Tauride) mint was on the Crimean peninsula and, as noted, opened in 1787. It closed in 1788, however, due to security concerns arising from the war that had broken out with Turkey. Those interested in the 1787 silver coins of this mint should consult the article by V.V. Uzdenikov printed in the Journal of the Russian Numismatic Society, (No. 73, winter 2002).

 

RWJ

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An example of the 1787 20K. This one sold in 2003. It's a shame about the scratch :lol: , but at least you can see what the coin looks like.

 

post-1230-1154398938.jpgpost-1230-1154398925.jpg

 

Steve

 

Nice coin. :ninja: Yours, I presume?

 

I wonder why the Tauric/Tauride mint used this distinctive design rather than the portrait/eagle design used on the regular Imperial issues. Certainly there are precedents, like Elizabeth's issues for Prussia or the Siberian series, but I just wonder why it was done.

 

Maybe so the coins could be quickly demonetized in the event that this mint and its dies might be captured by the Turks?

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Nice coin. :ninja:  Yours, I presume?

 

I wonder why the Tauric/Tauride mint used this distinctive design rather than the portrait/eagle design used on the regular Imperial issues.  Certainly there are precedents, like Elizabeth's issues for Prussia or the Siberian series, but I just wonder why it was done.

 

Maybe so the coins could be quickly demonetized in the event that this mint and its dies might be captured by the Turks?

 

According to V.V. Uzdenikov, the dies were done locally and it doubtful if anyone in the Crimea had the ability to engrave a decent portrait. The pieces were issued under the personal authority of Gregor Potemkim (Prince of the Tauride) and were a token coinage. These were probably struck in the presence of the Empress and Potemkin, who jointly visited the Crimea in 1787.

 

RWJ

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According to V.V. Uzdenikov, the dies were done locally and it doubtful if anyone in the Crimea had the ability to engrave a decent portrait. The pieces were issued under the personal authority of Gregor Potemkim (Prince of the Tauride) and were a token coinage. These were probably struck in the presence of the Empress and Potemkin, who jointly visited the Crimea in 1787.

 

RWJ

 

Thank you for this information. The lack of local engraving talent is an explanation which I had not considered.

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I am a bit puzzled. Most definately if all dies were engraved locally, that would explain why the design was simplified. But weren't the 5 kopek dies sent from other mints? And if this was the case, why weren't other denomination dies were sent at the same time?

 

There seems to be 2 kopek TM coin minted and the rest are fairly scarce...

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I am a bit puzzled. Most definately if all dies were engraved locally, that would explain why the design was simplified. But weren't the 5 kopek dies sent from other mints? And if this was the case, why weren't other denomination dies were sent at the same time?

 

There seems to be 2 kopek TM coin minted and the rest are fairly scarce...

 

Actually, just the dies for the silver tokens were done locally. Hubs were sent from St. Petersburg for the copper coins. Everything in the copper series except for the 5 kopecks ranges from very difficult to impossible. The piataks (5 kopecks) do show up on a semi-regular basis but are far from cheap.

 

RWJ

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Couldn't the silver hubs be sent together with the copper ones, or there were some kind of concern?

 

According to Uzdenikov, the decision to coin the silver pieces was made after Potemkin arrived in the Crimea. The copper hubs had been sent separately from St. Petersburg.

 

The TM copper coins were authorized by the usual Imperial decree but there was no authorization issued at St. Petersburg for the silver. Grand Duke Georgii Mikhailovich had a thorough search of the Archives made when he did his corpus volumes on Catherine II but nothing was found about the silver.

 

RWJ

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Tauric Mint, if I am not wrong is at the Southern end of Ukraine, (am I close enough Dave?)

 

 

It is right above the Krim Peninsula, known as Crimea in the west. Minting history in this region includes coins of Olbia, Pantikapaion, Phanagoria, Khersonesos during Greek and Roman times.

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  • 4 years later...

Very interesting thread. It is interesting to learn about the decrees of the Emperors/Empresses that directed the creation of the coinage we collect. It is a shame that more history books do not include information such as this. I love Russian history, but no history books I have read ever go into monetary issues. Which sucks. The only information that seems to be out there is in Russian with bits and pieces relayed by the people that speak both languages.

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Very interesting thread. It is interesting to learn about the decrees of the Emperors/Empresses that directed the creation of the coinage we collect. It is a shame that more history books do not include information such as this. I love Russian history, but no history books I have read ever go into monetary issues. Which sucks. The only information that seems to be out there is in Russian with bits and pieces relayed by the people that speak both languages.

 

There are certainly books which deal with monetary issues. For example, "Reform and Regicide, The Reign of Peter III of Russia" Carol Leonard from the Indiana-Michigan series in Russian and East European Studies" has a 27-page chapter on the economic situation around 1762. A little dry, but still.

 

Steve

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There are certainly books which deal with monetary issues. For example, "Reform and Regicide, The Reign of Peter III of Russia" Carol Leonard from the Indiana-Michigan series in Russian and East European Studies" has a 27-page chapter on the economic situation around 1762. A little dry, but still.

 

Steve

 

Ah very nice! At least that is a start! I am looking for it currently!

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