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Coin grading question...


canadamedic
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I would like to have some of my coins certified and graded and I see there are two options in Canada with ICCS and CCCS. From my research I've found most people in Canada prefer ICCS over any other, is this correct? Is that possible simply because it's been around longer than CCCS? What about the US services PCGS and NGC. I've visited the all the web sites (except ICCS since they don't have one) and CCCS seems to be the most economical at 10$ a coin (10 + coins) but in the long run is it really cheaper? Also does anyone know the rates for ICCS, otherwise I will have to directly phone them myself. I just find it odd that the most "respected" coin grading service in this country doesn't even have it's own web site.

 

Thanks for your help folks,

Brad

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Hello and welcome to CoinPeople. I cannot answer your questioni but some of out Canadian specialists will be along and I'm sure they'll give some info.

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canadamedic,

 

ICCS has been around for a long time, and you are correct in that they're the most respected. Not just because they've been around for a long time but the staff are bonafide experts in Canadian numismatics. Discuss coins with them and you'll understand. I have no reservation in recommending their certification services.

 

As for price, I always send in batches of 100+ coins, and have been charged $6 per item for non-gold coins. As you see, the volume discount is significant.

 

Don't let the absence of a website turn you off of ICCS. I don't know why they don't have one but I suspect they are too busy grading coins rather than worry about operating a web presence.

 

PCGS, NGC, ANACS, and ICG are the only 2nd choices I would consider for slabbing Canadian coins, with a stronger preference for PCGS and NGC because of their stricter standards.

 

Also keep in mind ICCS uses a sealed plastic flip instead of a hard plastic slab to encase the coin. Some people prefer hard plastic slabs but I prefer the ICCS flips because of ease of storage in binders.

 

Hope this helps,

jello

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The only downfall with iccs that I have noticed, is that graded iccs coins tend to sell for less than a similar coin in a 2x2. I know of only a handful of people who buy iccs coins, I have been dealing for 7 years, and currently have a store. If you check on ebay, you will see what I mean. I also have a friend who uses iccs extensively, we both have found that some of their grading is very questionable; Suppose it depends on which day of the week they are grading, and if they had a falling out with thir spouse the night before. :ninja:

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qualified_coinnut, it's unfortunate you feel that way. In my experience I've noticed the opposite trend in that realized prices of raw coins are outpaced by similar graded coins certified by ICCS. The catch here is that many sellers, knowingly or not, will overgrade their raw coins. BTW, I've been a collector since the 70's and have bought/sold on eBay nearly a decade now.

 

I've had hundreds of coins graded by ICCS, and find them to be very strict, but consistent. You say their grading is questionable -- can you provide some examples?

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qualified_coinnut, it's unfortunate you feel that way. In my experience I've noticed the opposite trend in that realized prices of raw coins are outpaced by similar graded coins certified by ICCS. The catch here is that many sellers, knowingly or not, will overgrade their raw coins. BTW, I've been a collector since the 70's and have bought/sold on eBay nearly a decade now.

 

I've had hundreds of coins graded by ICCS, and find them to be very strict, but consistent. You say their grading is questionable -- can you provide some examples?

I find them questionable on some examples I have seen. A good resource for seeing what iccs graded material is worth is ebay: I have sold iccs graded silver dollars, 50 cent pieces etc., and have received less than 50% of trends on most of these. Being in the coin business, I have found that interest in any slabbed or graded coins is minimal, about as much interest as in Canadian test tokens, or error coins. My business partner has had the same experience. I have purchased iccs graded coins from a good friend/client who has been collecting for over 25 years, we have both seen examples of iccs graded coins that are in our opinion sometimes overgraded, sometimes under, or not accurately described. A recent example was an 1870 L.C.W 50 cent piece, which we own, came back ef-40. The coin has a couple of good scratches visible to the naked eye, this was not in the grading description. Needless to say, the coin now sits in a 2x2. I don't disagree with you, I have found that different coins sell better in different locations. I used to sell at a flea market in Belleville, where I had lots of clientele who didn't mind paying good money for good coins. When the Belleville market closed, I set up in Kingston for 3 years, found it to be full of people who anted everything for next to nothing. This year, I am setting up in Antrim outside of Ottawa, I was there 1 day last year, and did extremely well. If you have a copy of the Canadian coin news dated March 07, a good article about graded coins is on page 7 "Certification tarnishes hobby", written by a collector of 40 years. At the store, when we get people bringing in graded coins, we always check ebay, and don't generally go by trends because we would lose our shirt if we bought graded coins at a premium, unless they are keys. If I run across any more "questionable examples", I will post pictures here.

Franz

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I am finding People are more interested in coins as bullion than collector pieces, due to the price of silver. I am getting one of those rare opportunities tomorrow to buy some great items, a complete set of Canadian silver dollars, including the 1948, but 3 out of the 4 1947's; I am quite excited, as I have only seen one 1948 silver dollar in the last 7 years(other than ebay).

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I thank you all for your expert advice. I think I will stick with ICCS for now though and wait to see how my coins make out after I send them. I am very new to all of this (basically 2 months). My father passed on his collection to me last month and I plan on adding to it for many years and then passing it down the chain to my daughters. I have found all of the coin collecting very fasinating. I'm like a kid with a new candy bar!

 

Thanks again! :ninja:

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Don't shy away from CCCS. They are new, but no less experts in Canadian coin grading than ICCS. Your Canadian coins will be accurately graded by either.

 

Advantages of CCCS over ICCS (besides price, possibly):

 

ICCS "slabs" can and have been faked. Anybody can make one with some flips and a heat sealer.

 

CCCS slabs would be extremely difficult to fake, because the flip is hot foil stamped with the logo. The manufacturer won't make these for anybody else, and even if somebody found a shady manufacturer they would have to order thousands of them. The likelyhood of this is next to nil.

 

ICCS has no online registry. This goes back to the forgery issue. There is no way to tell if the serial number is real.

 

CCCS has an online registry. You can enter a registration code and get confirmation of the coin in the flip and its grade.

 

ICCS has no web site.

 

CCCS lives in the 21st century.

 

The number of CCCS-graded coins in the market is climbing exponentially. If your goal is to get accurate grading of your Canadian coins, then there is no reason to not go with CCCS. If your goal is to try to get maximum dollar in an auction, then ICCS still pulls a little more weight (for now, but a few years from now that advantage will evaporate).

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Veru interesting observation, makes sense too, then again iccs has a certification # . I just bought $2500 worth of iccs coins yesterday, gues I'd better check them (actually, these came from a friend of mine who had all the coins graded personally. But, I do agree, I have had a few heat sealing machines before, normally found at yard sales for $5.00. Perhaps it's time to open my own certification service. 7 years of grading thousands of coins should qualify me as an "expert" :hysterical:Welcome to the site Daniel, always nice to see a fresh arrival :ninja:

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  • 5 years later...

Don't shy away from CCCS. They are new, but no less experts in Canadian coin grading than ICCS. Your Canadian coins will be accurately graded by either.

 

Advantages of CCCS over ICCS (besides price, possibly):

 

ICCS "slabs" can and have been faked. Anybody can make one with some flips and a heat sealer.

 

CCCS slabs would be extremely difficult to fake, because the flip is hot foil stamped with the logo. The manufacturer won't make these for anybody else, and even if somebody found a shady manufacturer they would have to order thousands of them. The likelyhood of this is next to nil.

 

ICCS has no online registry. This goes back to the forgery issue. There is no way to tell if the serial number is real.

 

CCCS has an online registry. You can enter a registration code and get confirmation of the coin in the flip and its grade.

 

ICCS has no web site.

 

CCCS lives in the 21st century.

 

The number of CCCS-graded coins in the market is climbing exponentially. If your goal is to get accurate grading of your Canadian coins, then there is no reason to not go with CCCS. If your goal is to try to get maximum dollar in an auction, then ICCS still pulls a little more weight (for now, but a few years from now that advantage will evaporate).

 

 

"ICCS has no online registry. This goes back to the forgery issue. There is no way to tell if the serial number is real."

 

To confirm that the serial number/coin is real and was graded you must call ICCS at their listed number. They will look it up for you and confirm.

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