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Countermarked Dollar


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A Bank of England countermarked dollar issued in 1797. This one features the bust of George III within an oval, countermarked on the neck of Carolus IIII (Potosi mint) eight reales. It is silver...honest!

 

Originally, these were issued at a value of four shillings and nine pence, giving rise to the witticism of `Two Kings' heads and not worth a crown' and the much more poetic `The Bank, to make their Spanish dollars pass, stamped the head of a fool on the neck of an ass'.

 

918593.jpg

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I love chop marked and counterstamped coins. I too have never seen one of these.What makes it even better is that its from Potosi and not Mexico City.Now if you can find one of those with Chinese chops you would really have a world traveler.

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I love chop marked and counterstamped coins. I too have never seen one of these.What makes it even better is that its from Potosi and not Mexico City.Now if you can find one of those with Chinese chops you would really have a world traveler.

 

The Bank of England dollar I posted in the virtual museum is struck over a spanish colonial 8 reales (all BofE dollars were, excepting for the proofs) AND has a bankers mark on George III's cheek. Have a look. ;-)

 

Ian

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Now that we are on this subject,The Bak of England also counterstamped US Bust Dollars, although there are people who doubt the authenisity of the counterstamp.

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Now that we are on this subject,The Bak of England also counterstamped US Bust Dollars, although there are people who doubt the authenisity of the counterstamp.

 

According to Coincraft's Standard Catalogue of English and UK Coins a few french Ecu's and American dollars were counterstamped with the oval stamp, as does Spink's Coins of England. These are however noted as being of the highest rarity.

 

The oval counterstamped silver was heavily counterfeited and resulted in the later octagonal countermark being used, and then again by the complete overstriking of the host coins with the BofE Dollar design.

 

I wouldn't hold my breath waiting to come across a genuine oval or octagonal Geo.III counterstamp on a US dollar. It would indeed be prudent to suspect the authenticity of the counterstamp on any that you might come across in the wild. ;-)

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  • 4 years later...

he Bank of England dollar I posted in the virtual museum is struck over a spanish colonial 8 reales (all BofE dollars were, excepting for the proofs) AND has a bankers mark on George III's cheek. Have a look. ;-)

 

Hello Ian,

I would like to know WHAT mark is on George III's cheek??

Your reply is much appreciated.

Bamboo

KL, Malaysia

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he Bank of England dollar I posted in the virtual museum is struck over a spanish colonial 8 reales (all BofE dollars were, excepting for the proofs) AND has a bankers mark on George III's cheek. Have a look. ;-)

 

Hello Ian,

I would like to know WHAT mark is on George III's cheek??

Your reply is much appreciated.

Bamboo

KL, Malaysia

 

see image below

 

This is generally referred to as a `chop' mark. They come in all shapes and sizes, sometimes chinese language characters are used Sometimes you come across coins that have been used in trade in China which are literally covered in different `chop' marks. Some collectors see these as `damage' others...including me......are fascinated by these, as they tell a history in their own right. Sometimes you can trace a coins journey on the basis of the various `chop' marks that appear on the coin.

1804Obv.jpg

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A Bank of England countermarked dollar issued in 1797. `Two Kings' heads and not worth a crown' ...

I got it intuitively, but had to look it up to be sure: 5 shillings to a crown; 12 pence to the shilling; hence 4/ 9p are short. (Was that spoken as "four and nine"? I hear that in old movies in English English. The last time was just a month or two ago, a classic Outer Limits, "The Sixth Finger" with David McCallum. The older sister is berating the younger for not getting correct payment or change.) Interestingly enough the scientist in that was named "Dr. Mallard."

 

------

Edit: I put the disk in and watched the scenes. "Twelve loaves at one and tuppence and all you bring back is 12 and thruppence? You're holding back one and nine!" The younger girl says that the professor must have given her the wrong change. I watched that scene and it is hard to imagine how. She told him one and tuppence and he said he had it, handed the coins, which she accepted. It didn't look like three Maundy groats and four ha'pence... Now I understand Turing: after base 12 and base 20, what's base 16?

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  • 1 year later...

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