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Which Do You Prefer To Collect.....


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For the past six months I have become more intrigued with circulated coins. I was always shooting for the best mint state coin I could find and afford. Especially blast white Morgans with super cartwheels. Now, my favorite grades are EF45 and AU50. The marks and wear for those two grades just seem to fit. So, I sold most of my blaster Morgans.

 

Now, my favorite coin in my collection is a 1893-S Morgan in G6. Thank goodness their were people who had reason to preserve some 89-S Morgans in mint state. But the real thrill for me now is owning a mintage rare (100,000) Morgan that was actually put into circulation. And survived it's "trip" to become a Good-6!

 

I'm hooked! My next favorite coin is a 1909-S VF Lincoln.

 

 

 

Jerry

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The majority of my coins are circulated. I have a few Indian Head Cents that are UNC. They're great for showing all of the details of the design. But the history of the coin and the thought about who may have used it and how is an important part of the collecting for me.

 

:ninja:

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I like circs myself, except for lincolns.  I hate circulated Lincolns.

 

Lincolns are the hardest coins for me to grade with my aging eyesight. I've stopped buying them for resale except to pick up singles in semi-key dates.

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I am pretty much with Art in post #4 and 28Plain's Gothic Florin avatar shows why. When you want to experience the details, then, yes, of course, the uncirculated coin is preferred. The higher the grade, the better. I have one Deep Cameo Proof 70 coin, a Roosevelt Dime. I am not a Roosie collector by any measure. I have two Mercury Dimes in true Uncirculated. They are both 1916-P because the hubs were "fresh" back then. You see a lot of Mercs from Word War II that are blast white or whatever, MS-67s and all that, but when you really examine the details, you realize how flat such coins are. So, yes, the more perfect the perfection the better the goodness of the ownership.

 

That said, part of the experience of collecting is holding the coin and wondering where it has been and what it has bought. Therefore, most of the coins I own have some character from circulation.

 

In many cases, for instance, among ancients, uncirculated examples are prohibitively rare. A nicer circulated find, Extremely Fine, is preferred because it shows more details. A coin with honest wear has character to be sure, but lacks those attributes that make such items collectible. Ancient Greek art must be seen to be appreciated. So, I accept the existence of circulation wear and try to collect the least worn example for the type.

 

With paper money, my preferences are for uncirculated because they are available at nominal cost. Furthermore, circulated examples might be harder to find for some issues. In any case, with printing, the details are considerable. Paper is so delicate that wear degrades the object. Stock certificates, checks, drafts, etc., come as they come. That is all that can be said.

 

With medals, there is little excuse for wear.

 

I do not understand collectors of commemoratives who accept worn examples. Commemoratives -- even Isabella quarters -- typically exist in high grades, often only in high grades.

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I do not understand collectors of commemoratives who accept worn examples.  Commemoratives -- even Isabella quarters -- typically exist in high grades, often only in high grades.

 

You already answered your own question - "part of the experience of collecting is holding the coin and wondering where it has been and what it has bought.". Holds true for commemoratives as well. Obviously, if they only exist in high grades, you will not get very far collecting well circulated examples. The reality of traditional US commemoratives, however, is that many did circulate and many exist today in well worn condition - and they look great! Imagine the history - paying $1 for a half dollar and then the half finds it way into circulation and is not pulled after years of travel. As for the modern US commemoratives - hey, if I could find some well worn examples from circulation, I *would* collect them - maybe I will some day. Even an SAE in VF would make an interesting piece.

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Joan's back!

 

In some instances I will prefer to buy uncirculated or circulated examples of a coin.

I love the way some coins age and wear in their travels and buy them for that reason.

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Guest Stujoe

I also like both. I think a lot of coins are very cool circulated and you can't get better history than a coin that actually did what it was intended to do. :ninja:

 

My collections are the antithesis of 'matched' sets. I like the variety of varying looks throughout the grade range.

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Well, I personally prefer them in brilliant uncirculated or proof if possible, especially if they are >1950s. I mean, they are pretty much affordable, unless they happened to be some rare coins.

 

Other than that, I guess I only prefer circulated ones if the original circulated ones are too expensive, or sometimes as copies if the price tags are almost impossible... :ninja:

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It's a case of economics. When I made a lot more money and had no children, it was highest UNC grade I could get. Now with 2 children and a much lower salary it's F-XF and I like it much better!

 

In fact my US type set(not finished) is in F-AU(moderns).

 

I've been seriously considering selling my UNC CC Morgans and replacing them with nice XF & AU coins.

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My collections are the antithesis of 'matched' sets. I like the variety of varying looks throughout the grade range.

 

 

Oww nooo! Gaps in sets can live with (usually there because i can't afford the coin in a grade to match the others) the essential bit for me is each coin has to look identical except for a different date. Which probably expains why i get dishearned by most of the sets i've tried to accomplish and then sell them.

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Circulated, for the most part:

 

Partly for my love of history & the old circs, they seem to tell much more to the "story".

 

Unc's are pretty , valuable & all, but when you think about it, all they did was get minted , put in a bag, then into a collector's collection. other than being made, they were never apart of history in a real sense. they were never used in commerce, never used to buy land, used in interactions between people, used to help foster the growth of our Nation.

 

Also, because I focus on Large Cents , circs are more affordable!

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Circulated, for the most part:

 

Partly for my love of history & the old circs, they seem to tell much more to the "story".

 

Unc's are pretty , valuable & all, but when you think about it, all they did was get minted , put in a bag, then into a collector's collection. other than being made, they were never apart of history in a real sense. they were never used in commerce, never used to buy land, used in interactions between people, used to help foster the growth of our Nation.

 

 

Agreed. Although i'm afraid when it comes to the modern post 17th century coins i have to have them in the best grades possibly so that i can appreciate the design and see the details. Near blank discs just aren't much fun, low EF is a good circulated grade to go for in these modern coins i find, much below EF and they just don't look as attractive to me. Coins below VF don't even get considered, i just can't live with them.

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