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It's all in the lightbulbs...


Tiffibunny
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Ok folks, tired of twiddling with that white balance, tired of taking 20 pics to get that silver coloring right? We bought these new lightbulbs this weekend...

 

Commercial Electric Daylight Lamp Bulbs from Home Depot (I think you can only get them there)

 

 

Reveal Bulb: (Before)

 

908844.jpg

 

New Commercial Electric Daylight Lamp (After)

 

908907.jpg

 

 

Reveal Bulb: (Before)

 

 

908846.jpg

 

 

New Commercial Electric Daylight Lamp (After)

 

 

908908.jpg

 

They are both the exact same coin. My setup is exactly the same and I changed no settings on the camera.

 

Stu, do you know what this means? I think Canadian coins will be good. I don't have one around to experiment with at the moment, but I'll try and get a comparison tomorrow.

 

And the bulbs are also extremely energy efficient. I used a 70 watt that only actually uses 19 watts.

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I have had some frustrating times taking pics of coins, for one thing I would like to build a stand so I have the camera at the same height all the time, but lighting is always a pain in the bum. So recently I expropriated my sons desk lamp for taking coin pictures, finally it works. Now my son cannot have the lamp back. Want coins, then no lamp for you!

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I'm sure.  :ninja:

 

Here they are...

 

292460_.jpg

 

Sorry, they were 60 watt.  $9.97 for this package this week on sale.

 

 

I bought those as full spectrum lights they were 10 euro apiece and half were dead the first week ( made in china )

I use them to help my plants through the dark winter days

Before that I used General Electric full spectrum light spots 60 watts

A pitty we have 220 volts or I could order them cheaply in the US

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I bought those as full spectrum lights they were 10 euro apiece and half were dead the first week ( made in china )

I use them to help my plants through the dark winter days

Before that I used General Electric full spectrum light spots 60 watts

A pitty we have 220 volts or I could order them cheaply in the US

 

The voltage'll get you every time, we're on 240v so they'd go with even more of a bang if you put them in over here!

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I just went from regular energy savers to Halogen. Although that is mostly to get better copper/bronze light intensity and color.

 

Maybe the best set-up is one set of bulbs for each coin metal :ninja:

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The voltage'll get you every time, we're on 240v so they'd go with even more of a bang if you put them in over here!

 

Yes and if you are of the do itself kind since two years they brought 380 volt and a neuter into all the houses in my street better to balance the phases so if you make a new electric outlet better be sure not to put the 380 volt on your washing machine

it will smoke :ninja:

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That's a heckuva difference, Bunnyperson :ninja:

Thanks for the tip. I think that'll save me some time in Photoshop!!!

 

Show some copper when you get a chance ... Puhleeeeze ???

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I tried those "daylight" type flourescent bulbs and I found I was getting a blue-ish tint to the images yet you don't seem to be having that problem. Are you editing the images at all?

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I tried those "daylight" type flourescent bulbs and I found I was getting a blue-ish tint to the images yet you don't seem to be having that problem.  Are you editing the images at all?

 

 

No, I never mess with the images other than cropping. That's why they always had a gold tint. :ninja:

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I have the gold tint problem also. I was actualy going to post asking what light to use! I will go pick up some of these to use. Too perfect Tiff. I want to get a light with a flexable base so I can possition it where I want. Any advice on possitioning of the light.

 

Thanks for the great info Tiff!

 

-Bobby

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I have the gold tint problem also. I was actualy going to post asking what light to use! I will go pick up some of these to use. Too perfect Tiff. I want to get a light with a flexable base so I can possition it where I want. Any advice on possitioning of the light.

 

Thanks for the great info Tiff!

 

-Bobby

 

 

I'll get a pic of my setup for you later I ran out of batteries in the camera. :ninja:

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yup, bulbs can make a big difference - I use 5000K "daylight" bulbs that look similar to the ones that you showed.  The place where I got them has this chart...

Link Don't know how accurate or meaningful it is...but I like the bulbs I am using.

 

The key to many of the comments about color cast is the color temperature (the K value) of the bulbs. Different films were (still are) balanced to different color temperatures with daylight being most common (5000K) for over the counter sales. Studio photographers use different films and correction filters depending on their studio lights, how long they have burned (they change with use), etc. Overcast photos were (still are) bluer (i.e. a cooler temperature or greater than 5000K). The gold and red hues come from the warmer bulbs (3200K, 2700K, etc.). Setting the white balnce in digital photography is akin to selecting the proper film for the light source. You tell the camera what the light source is and it adjusts so white is white. If you let it think you are using daylight, then warm light sources will have the yellow or red cast. Changing the bulb to daylight means you are using the light source the camera assumes you are using in the absence of other information.

 

If you look at Tiff's photos carefully, you will see that the shadows changed somewhat as well with the change in bulbs as the light pattern changed from the different bulbs, intensity, etc. Inserting a sheet of glass at 45° between the coin and the camera and bouncing the light off the glass has the effect of aligning the light rays that produces the axial effect.

 

In theory, it doesn't matter what color light you use if you correct for it. In practice, I believe different metals will react somewhat differently to the varying light sources and image quality degrades with every correction you have to apply after the image is captured.

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I'm more of a no fuss no muss photographer. No toying with settings every time, no futzing with equiptment, no playing with photoshop. This is the best I've come to just point and shoot and upload. I like to get quick good pics without wasting my time. :ninja:

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