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Notgeld


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Very cool. I understand that many of them were made from standard dies for one side with the other side customized to the city or businesses particular needs.

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Ooooo, I love that bridge at top! Cool stuff!

Yes, looks nice. That is the old Rhine bridge in Bonn, built in the late 19th century and destroyed in WW2.

 

alte-rheinbruecke_204x136.jpg

 

The best part of that bridge is not visible on that piece. Back then, Beuel (on the right bank) was not a part of Bonn yet. Due to some dispute, Beuel did not contribute anything to the cost of that bridge. So the city of Bonn paid it all, but added a little sculpture of a man who put his pants down and shows his nekkid bottom ... towards the Beuelers. After WW2 a new bridge was built there, and a copy of that figure was added. :ninja:

 

Christian

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Yes, Due to some dispute, Beuel did not contribute anything to the cost of that bridge. So the city of Bonn paid it all, but added a little sculpture of a man who put his pants down and shows his nekkid bottom ... towards the Beuelers. After WW2 a new bridge was built there, and a copy of that figure was added. :lol:

:ninja:

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Yes, looks nice. That is the old Rhine bridge in Bonn, built in the late 19th century and destroyed in WW2.

 

alte-rheinbruecke_204x136.jpg

 

The best part of that bridge is not visible on that piece. Back then, Beuel (on the right bank) was not a part of Bonn yet. Due to some dispute, Beuel did not contribute anything to the cost of that bridge. So the city of Bonn paid it all, but added a little sculpture of a man who put his pants down and shows his nekkid bottom ... towards the Beuelers. After WW2 a new bridge was built there, and a copy of that figure was added. :lol:

 

Christian

 

 

:ninja: Thanks for that! I love those kinds of little "hidden stories" in architecture.

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Yes, looks nice. That is the old Rhine bridge in Bonn, built in the late 19th century and destroyed in WW2.

 

alte-rheinbruecke_204x136.jpg

 

The best part of that bridge is not visible on that piece. Back then, Beuel (on the right bank) was not a part of Bonn yet. Due to some dispute, Beuel did not contribute anything to the cost of that bridge. So the city of Bonn paid it all, but added a little sculpture of a man who put his pants down and shows his nekkid bottom ... towards the Beuelers. After WW2 a new bridge was built there, and a copy of that figure was added. :lol:

 

Christian

 

Great story :ninja:

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Here's a couple of pieces I have from my family's hometown.

 

Gluck.jpg

 

In only 3 years it goes from 25 pfennig to a billion marks

 

 

 

Million.jpg

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Beautiful examples, Bill.

 

I wish someone made a website with a comprehensive notgeld coins catalog. Christian, Is there one in German? Is there a book in German with lots of pictures? The only English language book on notgeld that I know of was published by Krause and it leaves a lot to be desired.

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Beautiful examples, Bill.

 

I wish someone made a website with a comprehensive notgeld coins catalog. Christian, Is there one in German? Is there a book in German with lots of pictures? The only English language book on notgeld that I know of was published by Krause and it leaves a lot to be desired.

Sorry, no idea if there is such a website - while I find many notgeld coins and notes quite interesting, I do not collect them. Gietl Verlag (the biggest "numismatic" publishing house in Germany) issued a comprehensive series of notgeld catalogs - nine volumes, about 500 pages each. :ninja: Here is an example (4 pages) from Volume 9 - Special Notgeld:

 

http://www.gietl-verlag.de/shop/PDF/GI-6193.pdf

(These are "textile" notes from Bielefeld.)

 

This latest volume is a little thinner, only 200 pages. Guess there aren't that many fabric or leather notes ...

 

Christian

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't know of any websites, but there are at least two references on the coins in German. Unfortunately I don't remember the title of the major reference, it is normally refered to as Menzel. Found it, DEUTSCHE NOTMUNZEN UND GELDERSATZMARKEN 1840-1990 by Peter Menzel. I have a copy but haven't used it a lot. I don't read German. I don't recall how well illustrated it was. It is also a moderately expensive book. The other book DIE MUTMUNZEN DER DEUTSCHEN STADTE, GERMEINDEN, KREISE, LANDEN, ETC by Walter Funk is much less expensive an is fairly well illustrated.

 

I just collect the municipal issues and I collect them by Lamb numbers. Robert Lamb's Catalog of Grman War Tokens 1914 - 1922 is the best work in english and is well illustrated. If you can find a copy they are fairly cheap, but that is because it is a 40 year old work and the prices in it are completely worthless. It's great for identification though. Joel Anderson has new copies available for $15.

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