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Question about Acetone


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I want to begin with saying that I don't dip my coins in anything. I have (the tar encrusted ones) but those will not be offered for sale. I have read and visited several of the coin forums. And now I am confused again. So my question is....Is rinsing the coin in acetone the same as dipping? Or is dipping referring to something a little more heavy? If it is dipped in acetone, has it then become cleaned?

 

Thanks,

 

Linda

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Dipping usually refers to using some sort of metal cleaner, in other words an acid. Basically what happens is that the acid strips away part of the coin's surface, usually the toned part, leaving behind a bright surface. Since this alters the surface of the coin it is cleaning and should be noted (for modern coins at least) by those of high ethics.

 

Acetone is unreactive with silver and gold. If you dip an untreated silver coin in acetone nothing should happen. If you have a piece of tape on your coin, acetone should dissolve it. An acetone dip for silver and gold should not impact the surface of the coin and thus isn't technically cleaning the coin, it may remove some surface contminents.

 

Ammonia is better for silver toning than acidic dips, it mainly reacts with the oxide so it is still technically cleaning but it is much less harsh than the acidic dips.

 

Copper is much more reactive and should generally be left alone.

 

 

Has any read the coin chemistry book? Brent Krueger

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Acetone (or Xylene - similar product) only removes biologicals like finger oils, some dirt buildup, etc., and will also remove PVC, but neither product damages the actual coin surfaces.

 

Dipping refers to, as jlueke said, the use of an acid to remove metal from the coin's surface to restore brightness. This can usually damage the surface and destroy the original mint luster.

 

I have used Acetone and Xylene on copper without any adverse results. Neither product will alter the coin's color or surfaces.

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Firstly, acetone works quite effectively against PVC, or those horrible greenish plastic damage, that is if your coins have been encased in some PVC materials.

 

Acetone is the only solution that you can "clean" your coins safely but there are always exceptions to it. You cannot put copper or bronze coins in acetone or they will display some awkward toning.

 

However from your description of "tar" encrusted coins, I really doubt how much effect acetone will work. You can always try but if you don't really want it, you can always throw them out or sell them away. Some people wouldn't really mind such coins. :ninja:

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I often poor acetone over any new gold or silver coin

just to be sure the vendor had not put a fingerprint on it

And for AU I always put them in acetone overnight

and sometimes an AU moves up to the MS because the old fingerfat

dissolves and the mintlustre was not taken away but buried under

the grease

Sometimes ;) and then it is an happy moment :ninja:

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..

Acetone is the only solution that you can "clean" your coins safely but there are always exceptions to it. You cannot put copper or bronze coins in acetone or they will display some awkward toning.

...

 

 

I do not believe this holds true for all copper/bronze. I have been placing many such coins that I received from my great-uncle (well worn stuff) to neutralize the verdigris. I have not seen any noticable difference in toning. None of these coins were red to begin with, but most are toned brown. My guess is that the copper has such a strong layer of toning, that the acetone has very little affect, if any, on these coins.

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I do not believe this holds true for all copper/bronze. I have been placing many such coins that I received from my great-uncle (well worn stuff) to neutralize the verdigris. I have not seen any noticable difference in toning. None of these coins were red to begin with, but most are toned brown. My guess is that the copper has such a strong layer of toning, that the acetone has very little affect, if any, on these coins.

 

Acetone has the nasty habit of removing or exposing artificial toning

So if there is a reaction it is with natural fats or artificial toning like baking

a coin in a potato :ninja:

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There are still those who do not believe that acetone is totally harmless to coins - even gold and silver. I am one of them - thus I do not recommend the use of it unless it is to remove an even more harmful contaminant like PVC.

 

Acetone will not remove nor will it stop the destructive action of verdigris by the way.

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I have soaked penney's in acetone with mixed results. It does remove verdigries, as the acetone turns almost instantly green, but for some reason some of the coins come out streaky. Not sure why, unless I am not rinsing them thoroughly.

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First of all like any type of antique or artifact there is a differance between RESTORATION and REFINNISHING.Everyone knows that if you Refinnish a antique dresser the value is cut to half or lower, But if its restored properly not takeing the original finnish off there is a differance,and may even enhance the price!. Same with coins, as stated the coins with grime & tar can be taken off with mineral spirits,varsole,laquire thinner,and even common de-greesers. When I guy a roll of indian head pennys, I first remove all the grime with either of these solvants then apply a thin coat of silicone based oil. This neither hurts the coins or patina, but RESTORES the coin, not distroy it.also it enhances them!.$$$ Same with silver coins I use the acetone then use rubbing alchohol,this will help the coin to tone naturaly, it opens the pores of the metalWorks for me!.:ninja:

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Acetone has the nasty habit of removing or exposing artificial toning

So if there is a reaction it is with natural fats or artificial toning like baking

a coin in a potato  ;)

 

:ninja: I'm sorry--mental picture--baking a coin in a potato! ;)

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I have heard of guys taping them under their armpits for weeks :D

 

Or putting them in a potato and baking them :cry:

 

Or putting them in a box with a closed lid with a novelty shop stinkbomb :lol:

 

Or exposing them to a mixture of sulfur and iodine ;)

 

Even heating with a gasburner sometimes can work if you do not over cook the coin ( it should be saignant and not well done ) ;)

 

For every coin cleaning recipee I got a retoning recipee :ninja:

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