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Poltina 1761


vold
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As gxseries noted the quality of the letters on this coin is subject to doubt. It also appears to have artificial toning. Just about anything Russian and antique is subject to doubt now, especially nicer pieces. Often times in Russia and Ukraine it is possible to buy these coins in Russia for about 250 rubles or in Ukraine about 40-50 Hryvnia.

 

I have bought a very nice fake of the Konstantin Ruble of 1825 in Odesa for only 40 Hr.

 

One annoying thing for me as a collector and looking at online auction sites such as molotok.ru and eBay is that there are hundreds of fakes of Russian coins on at any given time. Do a search on Siberia and most of them are fakes. When you look at a lot of coins over years you develop an eye for the details of letters, quality of strike, overall appearance etc.

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Wow Ykpa, you gotta get me a fake 1825 ruble one day :ninja:

 

P.S. this is how a 1761 poltina should look like:

 

polt1761.jpg

 

Notice how awkard the fonts are? Also notice how circular your coin is? Most of the coins minted during that era wasn't perfected even up to the early 1800.

 

A novodel is no excuse either as the metal doesn't seem silver at all to me. Also as a final check if you don't have an inscribed edge, it's not likely that you have a genuine coin. Afterall, Uzedenikov seemed to have listed this poltina as rare, probably less than 50,000 minted.

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No doubts, not even a restrike but a fake! Just like gxseries and Ukra said. Sadly ebay is full of those and sometimes, luckily not often, they manage to deceive collectors and sell for big money.

 

 

 

:ninja:

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No doubts, not even a restrike but a fake! Just like gxseries and Ukra said. Sadly ebay is full of those and sometimes, luckily not often, they manage to deceive collectors and sell for big money.

:ninja:

 

 

I agree.

 

The coin is a crude counterfeit.

 

Vold, if this is your coin, get your money back if you can. If you can't, then I hope you didn't pay much for it.

 

Ukra's comments about the online auction sites are correct. Fakes are offered there frequently.

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Thanks for answers.

The metal is silver approximately 800'

An edge of a coin "rossijskaya poltina moskovskogo dvora"

???

 

With this key evidence, I am very confident that you have a horrible counterfeit coin. Not only do you have a horrible edge inscrption that doesn't fit with the coin, the metal test in whatever way you did doesn't seem right. I will do my best to make you understand why I thought this is a bad counterfeit in the first place.

 

You see, if you looked at the obverse image, you should be able to see the mintmark "CIIb". How on earth would you expect an inscription of "Russian poltina of the Moscow Mint" exist??? To make matters worse, such edge text inscription of poltinas only existed during Peter I's era 1723-1729. If this was genuine, it should have read "S. Peterburgskogo monetnogo dvora", which meant "of the St. Petersburg mint".

 

The next is how you managed to determine the purity of the coin. While the genuine coin is supposely around 77% of pure silver and the mass of the coin should be around 12.77, I honestly doubt if your coin comes anywhere near +-1 gram limit. Even if it doesn't pass the weight test, there are still too elements that doesn't make this a rare coin.

 

If you happen to take a look at your coin and look at every single letter "M", it seems very obvious that whomever who made this die definately had some eyesight problems even though he managed to carve the portrait Tzarina pretty well. The same happens with the reverse, as it seems the die creator had problems differentiating "M", "H" and the inverse "N".

 

Also, may I please kindly point out the glaring horrible double headed eagle on your particular coin??? It seems that they have been strangled. Double headed eagle minted during that particular time are depicted as long and firm, whereas yours seem to be short and way too thick.

 

I could possibly go on with the list, but I did state the biggest major difference. I hope that you will understand.

 

Do note that this particular poltina is considered rare, as in , probably less than 5000 exist. Such rarity would bring in at least a grand but that is only if it is a genuine. There are too many reasons why counterfeits sell so well because people don't know too much about it and when they see the huge hot Russian coin market boom - they just get dragged into it.

 

I really hope that this particular coin that you have didn't come from the ex-Soviet, or possible Eastern European countries or from China. They are the biggest "producers" of such counterfeited coins. Fear not, I do have some counterfeit coins and they are with me to teach me plenty of valuable lessons. :ninja:

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