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Years - Israel, China, Japan


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Errrrrrrr for coins, please use http://www.omnicoin.com Banknotebank.com is supposed to be for banknotes only... :ninja:

 

If you could direct me to the actual link for their collections, that would be great since I couldn't find anything like that.

 

Never mind. I've gotten plenty of 'you idiot' emails on this now.

Edited by Jessi
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The Israel ½ shekel is dated (5)738, which is 1978.  (KM#36.1)

 

The Japanese 1 yen is dated Showa 51, which is 1976.  (KM#74)

 

The Republic of China 10 cash is undated, but minted around 1920.  (Y#303)

 

Thank you very much!

 

BTW, what does the KM#36.1, Y#303, etc mean?

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Thank you very much!

 

BTW, what does the KM#36.1, Y#303, etc mean?

 

KM #36.1 is the number it is given in the Krause Book of World Coins which is the standard book for indentification.

 

 

Jessi,

 

Tiffi is right about the KM#. The "bible" of world coins is the Standard Catalog of World Coins, published by Krause publications. Currently, the main catalog is in it's 33rd edition (2006), which covers coins from 1901-date. There are also volumes to cover the 1800's and the 1700's. The complete library of SCWC is about 5000 pages. THE KM is in reference to Chester Krause and Clifford Mischler, who were the original authors/editors of the book. BTW, Krause publications also produce a similar library of banknote catalogs, originally author/editor Albert Pick, which is where most paper money gets their reference of P#.

 

Prior to the original edition in 1973 by Krause/Mischler, the best coin catalogs on the American market were published by Whitman (yes, the blue folder people), including A Catalog of Modern World Coins, which was author/editor R. S. Yeoman (yes, the RedBook author). Other major works include Coins of the World (1750-1850) by W.D. Craig.

 

Now, back to the original story. As Krause and Mischler (and later the other people at Krause publications involved in this evolving library) began compiling all the data used to create SCWC, they were well aware of the lack of information in some areas, especially some obscure sections, such as Chinese provincial issues and Indian Princely states. Wanting to insure a more complete and accurate numbering system, they (Krause & Mischler) opted to just use previous recorded information and numbering until more information could be compiled. As such, you will see many Y# (Yeoman's numbering from his book listed above) and C# (Craig's numbering from his book listed above) still listed in SCWC. Over the years, these Y# and C# listings have gradually been phased out in favor of KM#, and eventually, they will all be gone. So your coin, that is currently listed as Y#303, will eventually get assigned a new KM#.

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Here are the Japanese coin dates since 1900 if you are interested:

 

japcoindates.doc

 

That's only a useful site if you already know what date is on the coin. Here is a site that will teach you how to read the dates for coins minted since 1867.

 

Once you have the Japanese date conversion is easy - just add 1867 to Meiji dates, 1911 to Taisho dates, 1925 to Showa dates, and 1988 to Heisei dates. The overlaps of Meiji 45 and Taisho Gan, Taisho 14 and Showa Gan, and Showa 64 and Heisei Gan occur because none of the Emperors died on December 31, and the era changes coincide with assumption of the throne by the (former) Crown Prince.

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