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Yes, generally, cleaning coins is a big NO-NO. :ninja:

 

There are some methods such as using a solvent like acetone to remove PVC residue or some other soluable material on the coin that can cause little harm. But, most anything else that you will do to try and improve a coin will leave it looking un-natural and that spells the loss of most of the numismatic value the coin has to most collectors.

 

Never scrub and never rub a coin with anything. Abrasive cleaning is the worst thing you can ever do. It will leave scratches and hairlines even if you can't see them with the naked eye.

 

Most chemicals will not be appropriate either. There are a couple that are generally used for some purposes (like jewel lustre for removign toning) but it is best to stay away from them unless you really know what you are doing.

 

 

All of the above is my opinion only and is worth even less than you paid for it. ;)

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Yes, generally, cleaning coins is a big NO-NO. :ninja:

 

There are some methods such as using a solvent like acetone to remove PVC residue or some other soluable material on the coin that can cause little harm. But, most anything else that you will do to try and improve a coin will leave it looking un-natural and that spells the loss of most of the numismatic value the coin has to most collectors.

 

Never scrub and never rub a coin with anything. Abrasive cleaning is the worst thing you can ever do. It will leave scratches and hairlines even if you can't see them with the naked eye.

 

Most chemicals will not be appropriate either. There are a couple that are generally used for some purposes (like jewel lustre for removign toning) but it is best to stay away from them unless you really know what you are doing.

All of the above is my opinion only and is worth even less than you paid for it. ;)

 

 

I like your opinion my friend. Have you ever soaked some pennies in honey before? They come out clean without you having to rub them or use any chemicals.Pure honey nothing else.

 

But with that being said I will not clean any of our coins. Thanks for your help!

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Have you ever soaked some pennies in honey before? They come out clean without you having to rub them or use any chemicals.Pure honey nothing else.

 

 

I never heard of that before... (looks over at her junk wheatie bowl).... hmmmm

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Looks like I'll be soaking some cents tomorrow :ninja:

 

I've been soaking coins in various solutions for the past month. Some cleaned quite nicely after a few minutes, ammonia ate almost all the details off Mr. Lincoln's head.

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Looks like I'll be soaking some cents tomorrow ;)

 

I've been soaking coins in various solutions for the past month. Some cleaned quite nicely after a few minutes, ammonia ate almost all the details off Mr. Lincoln's head.

 

What are your soaking times ?

I have a proof 9999 gold coin with red spots and I tried all solvents known to me

But I may have to restart since I only soaked 12 hours in each :ninja:

A german coin forum says it is reacted silver surface contamination like silverchloride in that case I may have to resort to other things then solvents

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What are your soaking times ?

I have a proof 9999 gold coin with red spots and I tried all solvents known to me

But I may have to restart since I only soaked 12 hours in each  :ninja:

A german coin forum says it is reacted silver surface contamination like silverchloride in that case I may have to resort to other things then solvents

 

I doubt you'd harm the plumb gold coin with any sort of acid or alkali solution. Jeweler's pickle should dissolve silver chloride compounds if that's what's spotting your coin. An accomplished coindoc should be able to pickle it for you in a heated pickle pot. All it should take is locking plastic or nylon tongs clamping the coin by opposite edges and a very careful hand to avoid touching the proof surfaces.

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I doubt you'd harm the plumb gold coin with any sort of acid or alkali solution.  Jeweler's pickle should dissolve silver chloride compounds if that's what's spotting your coin.  An accomplished coindoc should be able to pickle it for you in a  heated pickle pot.  All it should take is locking plastic or nylon tongs clamping the coin by opposite edges and a very careful hand to avoid touching the proof surfaces.

 

As I see it I can reconvert the silverchloride contamination to silver by electrolysis active or passive or redox reaction maybe to have the same red spots again in a few years

Or I can try and remove the silverchloride by dipping but what am I going to find underneath the spots ? Damaged proof spots with different reflection or just vanished spots and no damage to the proof surface ?

 

Several german coins were returned to the mint with this complaint and replaced

by the mint

I do not have that option since I have the certificate of authenticity and the box but not the original purchase order

 

http://www.chemicalland21.com/arokorhi/ind...THIOSULFATE.htm

 

http://www.chemicalland21.com/arokorhi/ind...ic/THIOUREA.htm

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