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What interesting Coin edge designs do you know?


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Nowadays, coin designs are not taken very seriously, as they are usually flat, or reeded. The reason why? Probably because there is no need for such high technology counterfeiting devices like the 1700-1800 period. During those times, crude strikes existed and such edge "protection" was possibly needed as a counterfeit device.

 

I guess the reason why such technologies are not employed nowadays is because of the high running costs and it is reasonably hard to counterfeit recent design coins. ;)

 

(although Japan's 500 yen (approximately 5 dollar) coin was counterfeited twice in the last 8 years or so :ninja: )

 

So going back to the topic, do you know any interesting coin edge designs? I know that France used to be pretty big on this time and this was evident in their franc coins. I think 10 franc was one of them.

 

The most insane one that I know of is this one:

 

LOL WHAT COIN IS THIS?!?!?!

 

You can have a good laugh. ;)

 

:lol:

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The modern British 2 pound coin has "Standing on the shoulders of giants" inscribed on the edge. It's an Issac Newton quote.

I think that's pretty neat.

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Some links here for you to enjoy :cry:

 

Ripped out from Uzedenkov, Russian coins 1700-1917, this is a rather decent book to read. ;)

 

P.S. each of them is about 250kb or so. Pretty big :ninja:

 

http://img192.echo.cx/img192/6208/rusbookedge017ti.jpg

http://img45.echo.cx/img45/6803/rusbookedge029pd.jpg

http://img117.echo.cx/img117/5492/rusbookedge038hm.jpg

http://img27.echo.cx/img27/6986/rusbookedge042yc.jpg

 

I think I will remove these in a week's time... ;)

 

Enjoy. :lol:

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Several middle-eastern countries large silver have edge inscriptions. Turkey comes to mind as well, but I can not remember the denomination, and as I am at work, cannot look it up.

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I'm not sure what the one pound coins say, probably something about the queen but it is latin.

 

The two pound coins celebrate british industry thourgh the ages, hence the Newton quote

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Dutch coins: pre euro 1 gulden, 2.5 gulden and 5 gulden and now the 2 euro coin carry the incuse edge inscription "GOD * ZIJ * MET * ONS *" which means "God be with us".

 

 

The 1966 Italy 500 lire coin that I posted in the "coins wth ships" thread in "World and Ancient" has raised edge lettering, It says "REPUBLICA ITALIANA *** 1966 ***"

 

 

All 2 euro coins have edge lettering in a reeded edge. Some countries only have 2's in it others have more text and only Germany and The Netherlnads have a real motto, if I remember correctly

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All 2 euro coins have edge lettering in a reeded edge.  Some countries only have 2's in it others have more text and only Germany and The Netherlnads have a real motto, if I remember correctly

The German €2 pieces have "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit", the first words of the national anthem, on the edge. The ones from Finland and Greece have the country names ...

 

The edge of the 2 cent coin is interesting too. While milled pieces have many vertical lines on the edge, this coin has one horizontal line. The 20 ct pieces have a "Spanish flower" shape. Several countries have polygonal coins, such as the UK 20p and 50p pieces which have seven "sides", or the Austrian €5 collector coins with nine sides.

 

Christian

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Nowadays, coin designs are not taken very seriously, as they are usually flat, or reeded. The reason why? Probably because there is no need for such high technology counterfeiting devices like the 1700-1800 period. During those times, crude strikes existed and such edge "protection" was possibly needed as a counterfeit device.

 

I recall reading that another reason for reeding the edges (at one time) was to discourage shaving the coin - the idea being that removing a small amount of precious metal from a large number of coins would gain you a significant amount of precious metal.

 

Yeh, I agree that not enough edge attention is being paid by designers. I like the ornate edge on this common 5 rupee (India-Republic, KM#154.1)

 

gallery_69_14_64088.jpg

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Nowadays, coin designs are not taken very seriously, as they are usually flat, or reeded. The reason why? Probably because there is no need for such high technology counterfeiting devices like the 1700-1800 period. During those times, crude strikes existed and such edge "protection" was possibly needed as a counterfeit device.

 

 

Reeded or Milled edges were introduced at varying times in varying places. Most commonly in the 17th/18th centuries with the progression away from hammered coins and onto machine made coins with milled edges, hence the term milled coinage.

 

Other feature such as edge lettering were introduced for the same reason as the milling was introduced, to prevent people from clipping silver off of the coins and passing underweight coins on. Hence why British coins of this period are enscribed 'DECVS ET TVTAMEN' (An Ornament and Safeguard). Gold coins were similarly done.

 

Which brings to mind one story about eighteenth century England. Up until a certain point the edge milling on the gold guinea had been like most of the other denominations, set diagonally. However due to the prevalence of the guinea filers, who would file gold from the edges of the coin and then reingrave the reeding, something had to be done.

 

It was noted that certain issues were more suceptible than others to this filing. Issues where the legends were near to the edge generally escaped, but coins where there was a gap between the legend and the edge of the coin usually got filed down.

 

Thus by the mid-late 18th century the mint changed the obverse and reverse legends so that they were as close to the edge as possible and then the edge milling was altered from the diagonal style to a chevron style. The problem was greatly solved on the new coins.

 

So the edges of coins don't just make forgery more difficult, they also ensured that making a profit at the mint's expense was greatly reduced.

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One interesting one is the Petition Crown of Charles II. Thomas Simon created it in an attempt to win the office of mintmaster. His pattern crown included a petition or plea asking the king to examine his crown and compare it to that of the other suplicants and if it was better made then to award him the office. Now I have just paraphased the petition, but on the edge of the coin it runs for some thirty words or so in two lines and in several different fonts. I couldn't find the exact wording of the petition but I did find a picture of it here.

 

http://www.coinvideos.org/Introduction/page-sv22w.html

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Guest Stujoe
The big silver coins that I won from Stu have writing on the side. If I remember correctly it is a restrike. But I cant remember anything else about it.

 

Stu?

 

-Bobby

 

That would be the Maria Theresa retrike, I believe.

 

From:

 

http://www.eurocollections.com/cointalk/mtt_history.php

 

Merchants and traders preferred these coins because of their high quality and reliability. The raised edge-lettering “IUSTITIA-ET-CLEMENTIA” (motto of the Empress: Justice and Clemency ) was a welcome safeguard against the dishonest practice of “clipping” coins (that is, cutting or shaving silver from the edge of the coin). The Maria Theresa Taler could be trusted.

 

That is also the coin I was going to mention. :ninja:

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I couldn't find the exact wording of the petition but I did find a picture of it here.

It reads:

 

THOMAS SIMON . MOST HVMBLY . PRAYS . YOUR . MAJESTY TO . COMPARE . THIS . HIS . TRYALL . PIECE . WITH . THE . DVTCH . AND . IF . MORE (second line) TRVLY . DRAWN & EMBOSS'D . MORE . GRACE : FVLLY . ORDER'D . AND . MORE . ACCVRATELY . ENGRAVEN . TO . RELIEVE . HIM.

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It reads:

 

THOMAS SIMON . MOST HVMBLY . PRAYS . YOUR . MAJESTY TO . COMPARE . THIS . HIS . TRYALL . PIECE . WITH . THE . DVTCH . AND . IF . MORE (second line) TRVLY . DRAWN & EMBOSS'D . MORE . GRACE : FVLLY . ORDER'D . AND . MORE . ACCVRATELY . ENGRAVEN . TO . RELIEVE . HIM.

 

 

Mr Simon was to be disappointed, as John Roettier retained the post.

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  • 3 weeks later...
The German €2 pieces have "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit", the first words of the national anthem, on the edge. The ones from Finland and Greece have the country names ...

 

The Finnish 1 markka (1964 type) and 5 markkaa (1972 nad 1979 types) also had incuse edge inscriptions: Suomi Finland and Suomen Tasavalta respectively. I had always liked that feature and was disappointed when it was lost with the redesign in the early 1990's.

 

 

The edge of the 2 cent coin is interesting too. While milled pieces have many vertical lines on the edge, this coin has one horizontal line. ...

 

I found this very interesting myself. The first time I saw this in Germany I thought I had either an error or a coin that had two sides glued together! :ninja:

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Hehe, so much design effort for such a low value coin :-) Maybe that "line" was added to make it easier for blind people to recognize them ...

 

Another interesting edge design is that of the Swiss 5 fr coins. The pieces have an insciption (Dominus providebit) which used to be incuse until the late 1960s, then elevated until the mid-80s, then incuse again until 1993, and elevated again since then ... :ninja:

 

Christian

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