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Starving college student


Jacko23
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Hi my name is Jack. i'm an 18yr old college student and i spend most of my life eating ramen noodles and wondering if the power is going to stay on. i resently met a nice lady and she has some unusual coins she posted them on her message board earlier tonight asking what they are. she promised me that if i can find them a home and get them sold she'll give me 25%. come on please! ramen noodles are getting really old. does anyone know anything about these coins.

 

Coins--> http://www.sticktowhatyouknow.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=502

 

thank you very much,

starving college student

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I have to agree 26 cents ubt it wouldn't buy 2 packs or Ramen noodles, because he is only getting 25% of 26 cents. So he is only going to get 6.5 cents. Maybe she will be nice and give him 7 for it. But then she has to spend 37 cents for postage to send them somewhere. So really she would be losing money is she sold them.

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If those are worth more than their face values, I have too many corroded pennies to sell off :ninja:

 

I have special BLACK pennies. Yup black. That's what happens after sitting in pure ammonia for two weeks ;)

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I have no clue what happened to these poor coins. they seem to have been mis-minted the quarter seems to have been overbaked and has a large groove on the outer rim. the penny is missing most of its copper showing a silver interior. does anyone know anything about coins?

 

pennies from that year were made of 95% copper and 5% zinc. the only way the "brown" would come off to show "silver" would be a chemical reaction or an extra plating of metal. both of these would happen outside of the mint, and therefore would not bring any premium in value.

 

the quarter is corroded and has a groove cut into the rim. the composition of 1967 quarters is 75% copper, 25% nickel, with a center of 100% copper. the metals are clad together before being punched into coins, and there's no way the copper center can fall out. the missing copper rim would have to have been taken off by someone outside of the mint, and like the penny above, would not bring any premium in value.

 

on the bright side, you can always sell the penny to the guy who thinks it's worth $500. :ninja:

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Thats strange, I was told the pennie was worth $500.00 the nickel inside is what is showing, and it looks like chrome.

 

These are not corroding.  ;)  :ninja:

Who ever told you a cent had nickle inside should be in a pond paddling around with the rest of the ducks.
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Thats strange, I was told the pennie was worth $500.00 the nickel inside is what is showing, and it looks like chrome.

 

These are not corroding.  ;)  :ninja:

 

Daydream... it doesn't matter even if it's corroded or plated, it's still a penny unless it's a completely different metal. My dad does all sorts of metal plating, from copper plating to platinum plating. Chrome plating is no exception. Why on a penny? Who knows, probably for fun. ;)

 

If that person is GUESSING it's worth 500 bucks, sell it to him. The general opinion here is here to stay, unless you can get a coin dealer to have a different say in it. Or if you want to, you can always try scambay and scam all the way.

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Can I have the contact info of the person who would pay $500 for ANY 76 cent?

 

Also if anyone wants to pay more then $0.25 for a 67 quarter... I got those to :lol:

 

These are not corroding.  ;)  :ninja:

 

Ok, They may not be now... But they were ;) Any one of us could recreate these coins VERY easily.

 

Ask anyone who gets their streets salted... These are commonly salted road coins.

 

-Bobby

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The cent has been plated after it left the mint. No value above face value. (There is a lot of bad information on that forum thread you linked dealing with the composition of the cent.)

 

The quarter has been soaked in a mild acid such as vinegar for an extended period. The acid attacks the copper core more readily than it does the coppernickel outer layers and that is what caused the groove around the edge.

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