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It's a banknote of sorts. This is one of many, many "miniassegni" notes. During the mid and late 1970s coins in Italy were in short supply. So the banks were authorized to print these low-denomination notes from 1975 - 1978. 50 and 100 lire notes are the most common, however you do see them in 50 lire increments up to 350 lire. There were 50-60 banks that issued these notes. You might call them a modern form of the notgeld common to 1920s Germany. They circulated alongside the national currency.

 

In fact, it is the miniassegni where you can find the only two notes from San Marino issued in 150 and 200 lire denominations in 1978 from the Cassa di Risparmio Della Repubblica di San Marino. Unfortunately you won't find these notes in Krause (SCWPM) in any of the editions with the exception of the San Marino duo. In general they're quite common and inexpensive, especially in grades below UNC, however, as with anything, there's exceptions to the rule for particularly rare notes.

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These were issued by private institutions under approval of the central banking authority for a very specific time, value, and purpose. The main Krause catalogs only list notes issued by the national banks or note-issuing authorities. They should probably be listed in the Krause Specialized catalog, but they're not. Like many other notes. I can't speak to the inadequacy of Krause - it's a mess of a catalog these days in terms of its completeness, but it's a good general resource. Honestly, due to the number of them, like German notgeld and US Obsoletes of the mid 19th century, and even US national banknotes, there's so many varieties and types that it's impractical to list them all in Krause.

 

The miniassegni are similar to U.S. obsolete notes, also not listed in Krause. They have their own catalogs, notably Haxby. Russian revolutionary notes also aren't completely listed in Krause and have their own catalogs (probably Ryabchenko is the most known, but a newer one I think by Denisov is pretty good too). The miniassegni ALSO have a separate catalog, titled Catalogo Unificato dei Mini-Assegni.

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It's a banknote of sorts. This is one of many, many "miniassegni" notes. During the mid and late 1970s coins in Italy were in short supply. So the banks were authorized to print these low-denomination notes from 1975 - 1978. 50 and 100 lire notes are the most common, however you do see them in 50 lire increments up to 350 lire. There were 50-60 banks that issued these notes. You might call them a modern form of the notgeld common to 1920s Germany. They circulated alongside the national currency.

 

In fact, it is the miniassegni where you can find the only two notes from San Marino issued in 150 and 200 lire denominations in 1978 from the Cassa di Risparmio Della Repubblica di San Marino. Unfortunately you won't find these notes in Krause (SCWPM) in any of the editions with the exception of the San Marino duo. In general they're quite common and inexpensive, especially in grades below UNC, however, as with anything, there's exceptions to the rule for particularly rare notes.

These were issued by private institutions under approval of the central banking authority for a very specific time, value, and purpose. The main Krause catalogs only list notes issued by the national banks or note-issuing authorities. They should probably be listed in the Krause Specialized catalog, but they're not. Like many other notes. I can't speak to the inadequacy of Krause - it's a mess of a catalog these days in terms of its completeness, but it's a good general resource. Honestly, due to the number of them, like German notgeld and US Obsoletes of the mid 19th century, and even US national banknotes, there's so many varieties and types that it's impractical to list them all in Krause.

 

The miniassegni are similar to U.S. obsolete notes, also not listed in Krause. They have their own catalogs, notably Haxby. Russian revolutionary notes also aren't completely listed in Krause and have their own catalogs (probably Ryabchenko is the most known, but a newer one I think by Denisov is pretty good too). The miniassegni ALSO have a separate catalog, titled Catalogo Unificato dei Mini-Assegni.

 

@Rbethea Wow, thanks for the info, that really puts it into view now.

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I would have to say that IMO these should be listed in a specialized catalogue since they are virtually almost akin to traveller's cheques.

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  • 2 weeks later...

attachicon.gif20160504_001831.jpg

 

Can someone help me with this please, it's bugging me and it starting to get annoying, Is it Italian?

It's without a doubt Italian. "cinquanta" is Italian for "fifty", "Milano" is a city in Italy (eng: Milan), "lire" was the currency of Italy before the euro. And just the fact that the word "italiana" is clrealy written on it should remove all doubt. :)

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Very neat note and really great background info. I had no knowledge of this before reading this thread. Thank you all. I always like learning something new.

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