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I've always held the belief that the difference between slabbed and natural (I never use the term 'raw') is between investors and numismatists :ninja:

 

AGREE

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Huh, I'm kind of hung up on this one. I'm currently trying to put my type set in Kointains and then putting the capsules in a specially made album for them. All but one of my current pieces has been purchased natural (hubby's birthday present for me) and since it was no grading service I had ever heard of I had no qualms about cracking it out and putting it into a capsule. What I'm really stuck on the fence on, though, is when to buy in slabs (this would have to be in PCGS or NGC) or not. I need to figure out a value at which it would be better to ensure that the coin is genuine (not quite up to speed in determining fakes) than to save some money by buying natural (you're right, "raw" sounds like "scratched raw" and we don't want that, do we?). And then, once I do buy a PCGS or NGC graded piece, how can I justify cracking it out? But I don't suppose I'll have to worry about that until I'm out of college, out of debt, and in the money.

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Huh, I'm kind of hung up on this one. I'm currently trying to put my type set in Kointains and then putting the capsules in a specially made album for them. All but one of my current pieces has been purchased natural (hubby's birthday present for me) and since it was no grading service I had ever heard of I had no qualms about cracking it out and putting it into a capsule. What I'm really stuck on the fence on, though, is when to buy in slabs (this would have to be in PCGS or NGC) or not. I need to figure out a value at which it would be better to ensure that the coin is genuine (not quite up to speed in determining fakes) than to save some money by buying natural (you're right, "raw" sounds like "scratched raw" and we don't want that, do we?). And then, once I do buy a PCGS or NGC graded piece, how can I justify cracking it out? But I don't suppose I'll have to worry about that until I'm out of college, out of debt, and in the money.

 

Exactly the reasons I buy slabs with my most valuable acquisitions

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I'm to old to worry about a coins value in the future. I could care less about the preservation or future value if slabbed or not. I've been collecting coins for well over 60 years and if I kept slabbed coins, I would need a separate house for them since they take up way to much room. Presently I have over 100 Whitman Classic Albums and mostly full. Many boxes of proof and uncirc sets from as far back as I can remember, rolls of uncirc coins, many boxes of coins in 2x2's. If I even had a fraction of all this in slabs, I would have had to buy a much bigger house a long time ago. After a coin show my garbage cans get all the plastic from slabs.

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I'm to old to worry about a coins value in the future. I could care less about the preservation or future value if slabbed or not. I've been collecting coins for well over 60 years and if I kept slabbed coins, I would need a separate house for them since they take up way to much room. Presently I have over 100 Whitman Classic Albums and mostly full. Many boxes of proof and uncirc sets from as far back as I can remember, rolls of uncirc coins, many boxes of coins in 2x2's. If I even had a fraction of all this in slabs, I would have had to buy a much bigger house a long time ago. After a coin show my garbage cans get all the plastic from slabs.

As a collector, I can agree with your sentiment 100%. However, the perspective changes when the collector decides to slip into the role of a seller.

 

As a fellow collector, and as much as I find the TPG "mantra" repulsive, I know that whoever inherits my coins will not know as much as 1% about them as I do. If I knew that I had to liquidate my collection within the near future, I would slab as many of them as I could (within reason, of course). Because I know that it is the only way that someone who has no clue about coins will be able to sell them for anywhere near their proper value.

 

The only reason I would ever crack out a coin is if I thought that it was undergraded, and then again only if I intended to sell it.

 

(Just my 2 cents' worth...)

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Why not arrange a sale or auction with a reputable dealer who can then have the coins slabbed (or not) depending on the market conditions at the time.

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As a collector, I can agree with your sentiment 100%. However, the perspective changes when the collector decides to slip into the role of a seller.

 

As a fellow collector, and as much as I find the TPG "mantra" repulsive, I know that whoever inherits my coins will not know as much as 1% about them as I do. If I knew that I had to liquidate my collection within the near future, I would slab as many of them as I could (within reason, of course). Because I know that it is the only way that someone who has no clue about coins will be able to sell them for anywhere near their proper value.

 

The only reason I would ever crack out a coin is if I thought that it was undergraded, and then again only if I intended to sell it.

 

(Just my 2 cents' worth...)

 

I think Bob hit the nail right on the head. As soon as you go from collector to seller you appreciate how much more you will realize if a coin has been certified by one of the big three.

Even if as a collector you cannot appreciate them as much sealed in a slab.

 

I have two collections, one is just slabs, one is just raw.

I want it all! :ninja:

 

PS - I have only cracked out one slab, as I knew it was undergraded by ANACS. Resubmitted to NGC it went from an AU53 to AU58.

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I think Bob hit the nail right on the head. As soon as you go from collector to seller you appreciate how much more you will realize if a coin has been certified by one of the big three.

 

I think this is what the TPG markerting departments want people to believe. However this assumes the grades you get will create a market price that is higher rather than lower. It could well be that a perfectly nice gem coin would bring somewhere between MS64 and MS65 money raw, but ocne it's in a MS64 slab it will only bring that price. Until it is cracked out.

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I think this is what the TPG markerting departments want people to believe. However this assumes the grades you get will create a market price that is higher rather than lower. It could well be that a perfectly nice gem coin would bring somewhere between MS64 and MS65 money raw, but ocne it's in a MS64 slab it will only bring that price. Until it is cracked out.

 

Sometimes this is true, especially with more common uncirculated United States coins.

 

But anything from Europe from the 1700's in really nice condition usually benefits from being certified as buyers are sure it's not a Chinese counterfeit. Especially gold coins. Especially if you bought it raw and can prove that you sent it in to be certified.

 

I usually buy raw coins and take my chances. But these days I really only buy from people I trust.

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Sometimes this is true, especially with more common uncirculated United States coins.

 

But anything from Europe from the 1700's in really nice condition usually benefits from being certified as buyers are sure it's not a Chinese counterfeit. Especially gold coins. Especially if you bought it raw and can prove that you sent it in to be certified.

 

I usually buy raw coins and take my chances. But these days I really only buy from people I trust.

 

If you buy from people you trust and you know somehting about what you are collecting then a TPG is superfluous.

If you are buying on Ebay it makes much more sense to avoid anything not in a slab.

 

Whether it's type coins or 18th century European crowns, I think it's worth the effort to look at and read about the coins enough so that you can make an informed decision either way. A coin is a coin is a coin. Slabs seem to change characteristics as the "market grading" is adjusted.

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Are you looking for examples for your sets in slabs or raw?

I look at both, but almost all my coins in the type set have been purchased raw. I still haven't gotten around to cracking out my early bust half from it's slab. Maybe today I'll free her...

 

Both. I finished a set in raw, now considering a set slabbed.

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