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All Roads Lead To Rome.


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KGrHqZhwE6Gb0BttqBOrfnVcMQ60_12.jpgKGrHqVicE6MBMhBmBOrfsG9sQ60_12.jpgRomanMilestone.jpg

 

 

Obverse: Workmen quarrying rock & transporting it, 2 central figures, one a horseman, one on foot wearing a toga, discussing the operation & pointing. In exergue: ESTABLISSEMENT DES GRAND CHEMINS. A.R.442.

Reverse: Two travellers resting by the side of the road, one points towards either the city or the 2 milepost. In the exergue: POUR L'UTILITE PUBLIQUE. A.R.442.

From Dassier's Roman Series #17.

 

The city is of course Rome & the road is the Appian Way.

 

The road was named for Appius Claudius Caecus(blind), the Roman censor who began and completed the first section as a military road to the south in 312 BC during the Samnite Wars. He begain the road so the soldiers fighting the Samnites could be supplied, by the shortest route practicable, direct from Rome.

 

The cud is a sign of the death throws of the obverse die & is not the world's first speedbump. The photo is of the 1 milepost on the Appian Way, which, like the ones depicted on Dassier's medal, is of a much later date than 312 BC./A.R.442.

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Neat medal. The die break is interesting as well. I wonder if it was an accidental break or an attempt to cancel the die.

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What do you think caused the band of metal on the obverse?

I found the huge cuds pretty interesting as they are so dramatic, it did not put me off buying the medal, in fact it made me want it more.

 

It is the same colour so the only two possibilities that I can think of are the die cracked/shattered or that molten metal was spilt on it, my money goes on the first, the die broke. If there had been scrap metal on the planchet when the medal was struck the impression right next to the cud would not be so sharp, IMHO.

 

If we can find a picture of another example, with the begins of a crack/ cracks :) that would settle the issue, until then I guess it will remain just speculation. I am very open to other opinions.

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I wonder if it was an accidental break or an attempt to cancel the die.

 

I posted my reply to Clive before I read your post Art, but as I said, if we can find an earlier example with the start of a die crack that would settle it. For now my money is on an accidental broken die but your suggestion of a cancelled die is interesting.

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One of the most impressive examples of a cracked die that I have ever seen. I would have bought the piece as well just because of the crack. Finding an earlier state would be interesting.

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I found the huge cuds pretty interesting as they are so dramatic, it did not put me off buying the medal, in fact it made me want it more.

 

It is the same colour so the only two possibilities that I can think of are the die cracked/shattered or that molten metal was spilt on it, my money goes on the first, the die broke. If there had been scrap metal on the planchet when the medal was struck the impression right next to the cud would not be so sharp, IMHO.

 

If we can find a picture of another example, with the begins of a crack/ cracks :) that would settle the issue, until then I guess it will remain just speculation. I am very open to other opinions.

 

It is a wonderful example and, as you suggest, the die error makes it all the more interesting. Thank you for sharing, Pat. :bthumbsup:

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