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Collecting copper coins may change your eating / cooking habit!


gxseries

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Thought I'll share something that I found a bit funny recently -

 

I bought myself a fair chunk of corroded copper coins over the years and some are pretty scarce. Only thing that ruins them is the ugly verdigris. I haven't been actively conserving them but have been putting more effort in since I have more time than before.

 

The funny bit that I find is, knowing that you need to use extra virgin olive oil to preserve them, I have changed my cooking oil from "whatever is the cheapest off the shelf" to generic extra virgin olive oil. Sure it's perfect for Italian dishes but it can be a bit hard for Chinese stir fry when I run out of the normal cooking oil. And of such reason, I'm been cooking more Italian dishes which is not my speciality. :lol:

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I started using more olive oil my self for coins and cooking. But now have most of my coins soaking in mineral oil. I do start them in olive oil then swap to mineral though. Don't think I'm going to try cooking with mineral oil though. :grin:

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I started using more olive oil my self for coins and cooking. But now have most of my coins soaking in mineral oil. I do start them in olive oil then swap to mineral though. Don't think I'm going to try cooking with mineral oil though. :grin:

 

 

:hysterical: I'd skip the cooking with mineral oil part too. :grin:

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You don't say what kind of corroded coins. I've moved away from Olive oil to distilled water. I soak them in that, easier to clean off the coins. When I used olive oil I would use TSP to remove it. If this is bronze disease (copper chloride) forming on your coins you probably need more drastic measures. I would start by boiling them in distilled water. Then soak them in Sodium Sesquicarbonate solution. Alternatively boil in the solution too. There is a more effective chemical but it is not safe for home use. You can make your own Sodium Sesquicarbonate by mixing equal parts by weight of sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate (baking soda and washing soda)or pick it up for less than $2/pound from a chemical supplier. Another way to clean off the green growth is electrolisys, but it does tend to come back eventually (years later) with this method.

 

Follow the soak in Sodium Ses. with a soak in distilled water, changing the water frequently. For ancient bronzes I will then hold them at 200F for about an hour and seal with rennaissance wax, buff lightly if desired.

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