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Century Coin Set


jlueke
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How many centuries can the collector on a budget cover in terms of coinage? I think all but a few are possible. The expensive coins tend to be portraits of famous people like Caesar and Charlemagne. From bronzes of Alexander the Great in the 4th century B.C. to the coins of the 21st century there are many affordable options. Parthian drachms from the 1st century B.C. can be had for $30. The Roman Imperial coinmage series is full of affordable pieces as are the Byzantines and Sasanian era. A drachm from Tabaristan covers the 8th century AD and Indian coinas from the 9th century are plentiful and affordable. European silver pennies can be had for $50 by the time of the 13th or 14th century. Turkish bronzes area affordable in the 10th. A Chinese piece may fit well into the 12th century slot.

 

I think a set of 25 centuries can be put together for no more than $50 per coin. At $10/week that is a little more than 2 years to complete a very interesting set.

 

The main point is that the task may sound daunting, but in reality this is probably no harder than finding those pesky key dates in the modern US series.

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As long as you're not fussy about where the coin comes from it's very managable indeed.

 

As it stands so far i've managed to cover 10th-15th with just English coins. 17th/19th are British, 18th are French and 20th are from all and sundry. Although i'll admit none of them are below the $50 mark, except for the 20th/21st. (A couple of the 12th/13th century ones are about $50)

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10 dollars a week? Hum, are you trying to make a set so that even a young kid can make such sets? ;)

 

Indeed

:ninja:

 

I find that there are a good number of people who shy way from older coins because they think things are too expensive. A lot of sets really aren't including many ancient ones.

 

Of course rich people will always be able to upgrade their sets. The first century Tiberius denarius becomes a gold stater, the Parthian Gotarzes drachm a Baktrian high relief portrait tetradrachm and the silver groschen from Hambur a spectacular city view Thaler.

 

But to me the story and history is more compelling than the coins, although there's nothing wrong with getting all the aesthetic glory and prominence money can buy :-)

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My dearest coin? English hammered silver of Edward 1, £14.

 

Cool, the middle ages really have a lot of interesting affordable coins.

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Edward I pennies are quite cheap. (As are Henry III), Both are fascinating serieses in their own right.

 

I've often wondered about collecting Edward I pennies by class, but i've got enough on at the moment. One day i might though! ;)

 

By class, that's getting pretty detailed :ninja:

 

I've never quote caught on to European History generally and English History in particular. Maybe it's because of school, too much focus on the same events over and over again. I did have a William I penny for a while, until I traded it in at CNG for some auction spending money :-0

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By class, that's getting pretty detailed  :ninja:

 

I've never quote caught on to European History generally and English History in particular.  Maybe it's because of school, too much focus on the same events over and over again.  I did have a William I penny for a while, until I traded it in at CNG for some  auction spending money :-0

 

 

Medieval history is my passion. I have a degree in Medieval history (English variant), although i've also studied a bit of France and Italy too.

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Medieval history is my passion. I have a degree in Medieval history (English variant), although i've also studied a bit of France and Italy too.

Aha! Hence the name I take it.

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Henry II is sort of my interest. The period that has completely captivated me is the Anarchy. I'm currently reading a novel based upon it (to enrich all the other 20 odd books i've read on it). You know i could quite happily go into teaching and teach this for the next decade or so, i never get bored of that particular period.

 

I've got to hit the online bookshops and see if i can't find myself a copy of the Gesta Stephani (R H C Davis edition).

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The idea in general is interesting. For me however, before I would even begin to start collecting such a set, I think I would have to draw a chronological & geographical map that I would follow. Either solely one area or than different areas during different periods. The latter would definitely have to be predetermined before I would begin.

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$10 is do-able with patience, and if you don't mind having a bunch from one country... to use some examples of ones I think would be easier

 

1st c. BC - Roman / As of Augustus

1st c. AD - China / Wang Mang Interregnum cash coin

2nd c. AD - Roman / Fouree of Septimus Severus denarius

3rd c. AD - Roman / Nicaea provincial coin

4th c. AD - Roman / (almost anything, ie. Constantius II AE3/4)

5th c. AD - Roman / AE3/4 of Theodosius II

6th c. AD - Byzantine / Justinian I (any copper)

11th c. AD - China / North Sung Dyn. cash coin

17th c. AD - Poland / Solidus

18th c. AD - China / Chi'en Lung cash coin

19th c. AD - Britain / 1860s penny

20th c. AD - (lots of nice, cheap pre-WWI stuff)

21th c. AD - (pocket change?)

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I have trouble with Chinese currency, i can relate to most others but i seriously struggle to relate to cash coinage... looks more like a... well a washer then a coin.

 

That'd be the one that would stump me because i'd have to find something from somewhere else.

 

I remember Stujoe once stated that some coinage he takes little interest in because he finds it hard to relate to, i'm afraid alot of African/Asian currency does this for me i feel removed from it all. I think this is also why i haven't branched out into ancients yet.

 

But yet i can take a coin from most periods in German history (though i've never been to Germany) but yet i can totally relate to it. Weird.

 

I think it must be a cultural thing. Russia is another one i've been avoiding these many years. However hopefully i'll be able to include a Russian coin in my 1780s set at some point so i can conquer that fear.

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$10 is do-able with patience, and if you don't mind having a bunch from one country... to use some examples of ones I think would be easier

 

1st c. BC - Roman / As of Augustus

1st c. AD - China / Wang Mang Interregnum cash coin

2nd c. AD - Roman / Fouree of Septimus Severus denarius

3rd c. AD - Roman / Nicaea provincial coin

4th c. AD - Roman / (almost anything, ie. Constantius II AE3/4)

5th c. AD - Roman / AE3/4 of Theodosius II

6th c. AD - Byzantine / Justinian I (any copper)

11th c. AD - China / North Sung Dyn. cash coin

17th c. AD - Poland / Solidus

18th c. AD - China / Chi'en Lung cash coin

19th c. AD - Britain / 1860s penny

20th c. AD - (lots of nice, cheap pre-WWI stuff)

21th c. AD - (pocket change?)

 

I do like no more than one coin per "culture" sub rule. You could do Roman Republican, IMperial, and Byzantine but not three Imperial :-)

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