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Q. about Russian coins struck at foreign mints


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I was wondering what the normal procedure was for supplying foreign mints with the metal and dies used for striking Russian coins? For example, did they ship silver bars to other countries, to be melted down and further processed into planchets, or did they prepare the planchets at home (Russia) first -- perhaps even with the edge lettering already made? If the latter, it might explain the existence of some interesting varieties.

 

We know, for example, that the 1902 gold 37-1/2 rouble donative coin has the Paris star on the edge, but actually was struck in St. Petersburg. This would suggest that planchets were made with the edge lettering done before being shipped out of the country (if they indeed had planned to strike the coins in Paris afterwards). I wonder if this was the procedure followed for silver coins, too?

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I was wondering what the normal procedure was for supplying foreign mints with the metal and dies used for striking Russian coins? For example, did they ship silver bars to other countries, to be melted down and further processed into planchets, or did they prepare the planchets at home (Russia) first -- perhaps even with the edge lettering already made? If the latter, it might explain the existence of some interesting varieties.

 

We know, for example, that the 1902 gold 37-1/2 rouble donative coin has the Paris star on the edge, but actually was struck in St. Petersburg. This would suggest that planchets were made with the edge lettering done before being shipped out of the country (if they indeed had planned to strike the coins in Paris afterwards). I wonder if this was the procedure followed for silver coins, too?

 

The general rule in such matters was for the home mint to send complete hubs for the dies and edging

devices. These hubs were then used to create working dies. The silver was normally purchased from

local suppliers and the home government reimbursed the foreign mint for the labor costs and the metal.

 

So far as I know, the star on the edge of the 37.5 rouble pieces being the same as Paris was merely a

coincidence.

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The general rule in such matters was for the home mint to send complete hubs for the dies and edging

devices. These hubs were then used to create working dies. The silver was normally purchased from

local suppliers and the home government reimbursed the foreign mint for the labor costs and the metal.

 

So far as I know, the star on the edge of the 37.5 rouble pieces being the same as Paris was merely a

coincidence.

Thanks, Bob ... this is really good to know! :art:

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