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Smashed pennies from Ye Olde Curiosity Shop


bill
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We stopped to see Ye Olde Curiosity Shop on our recent trip to the Northwest. Jules Charbneau married the owner's daughter and managed the shop for awhile around 1909/10. The shop is still in the same family, quite a feat after more than 100 years. It has changed with time, but they still have many of the items that made them the place to visit on Seattle's docks. I picked up two enlongated or smashed cents for my collection. These became subjects for two more composite images today.

 

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The image on the obverse is the shop's mummy, Sylvester, from the Gila Desert in the American Southwest. Sylvester was shot in the 1890s and his body treated with arsenic for some unknown reason. He was exhibited at fairs and Ripley's Believe it or Not Museums until he was purchased by the shop in 1955.

 

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The mermaid (and her baby) are another artifact from another time. When was the last time you saw a real mermaid?

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Neat! I was thinking of the YOCS in London when I first saw your post as they've sold lots of souvenir spoons over the years.

 

Did you get lunch at Ivar's by any chance? It's one of my favs.

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We didn't stop to eat lunch when visiting the shop, we headed out for Idaho right after our visit. We had a great visit with the shop's owners, talked about memories of Jules, the shop, and old Seattle. Great people. And yes, the name was inspired by Dickens.

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The docks have been rebuilt and the buildings rebuilt on several occasions in the past 100 years. I think this is their fifth location (if I remember right) within a two or three block radius over time. They have a short history online. They were also the subject of a book, 1001 Curious Things: Ye Olde Curiosity Shop and Native American Art, by Kete Duncan, published by the University of Washington Press.

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