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1914-SP BC 20 Kopeks Russia question


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First of all, what does the SP mean after the date?

Secondly, when taking straight on both sides have heavy die polish lines.

Then if image is taken a little different view(tilted) the die polish lines disappear almost

looks like a proof or deep proof like.

 

Graded MS 65 PCGS

 

 

Can someone give me some info

 

9d489418.jpg

bbf34fd7.jpg

 

aa55d600.jpg

3afdf06c.jpg

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First of all, what does the SP mean after the date?

Secondly, when taking straight on both sides have heavy die polish lines.

Then if image is taken a little different view(tilted) the die polish lines disappear almost

looks like a proof or deep proof like.

 

Graded MS 65 PCGS

 

Can someone give me some info

 

You do have a good camera! :bthumbsup:

 

Here are some proof and business strikes for comparison:

http://www.m-dv.ru/catalog/id,399/prohod.html

 

I think that business strikes with such heavy die polish, as you have correctly noticed, were quite common (also in other countries). But IMHO it is not proof. From the pictures, I don't see this coin as "prooflike", either, because the surfaces are not as reflective as they should be for such a designation.

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grade is or about correct - MS 65 PCGS; it does not look proof, IMXO

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Personally I find the workmanship on these coins astounding. It's considerably smaller than a quarter and the amount of detail is amazing. They aren't terribly expensive (unless even they participated in the general price hikes), I was able to buy an NGC MS-67 of 1915 (no mint mark as I will explain below) for fifteen bucks (the cost of the slab!) once. (It's quite heavily toned.) I imagine someone figured it was actually a proof and decided to try his luck submitting what was then a ten dollar coin.

 

It's the mintmark - St. Pretersburg

 

Just for some information overload on this:

 

С. П. Б.

САНКТ ПЕТЕРБУРГЪ

Sankt Peterburg*

 

The last letter is a "hard sign" and after 1917 the Russians stopped using it at the end of words that ended in a "hard" consonant. (Other words that ended with the "soft sign" Ь retained that sign.) It's probably the easiest way for a non-Russian reader to tell whether a Russian text came from before or after the 1917 Revolution: look at the ends of words and if many end in Ъ it's pre-Soviet. The last of the three letters in the mint mark is the "b" in "burg". Even though ПБ is an abbreviation for one word, a period was placed between the П and the Б, possibly to make it look "even".

 

After the start of WWI, the Russians renamed the city "Petrograd" and discontinued the use of the mint mark (whether this was the plan or they just couldn't decide what to change the mint mark to, is a different question), so coins dated 1915 and later ended up with no mint designation (this was safe because only one mint existed at the time).

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Thanks everyone for your replies....very helpful :bthumbsup:

you are welcome :art:

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