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World's First Bimetallic Coin


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Technically it isn't the worlds first bi-metallic coin that honour would go to the tin farthings which were produce at the end of the 17th century in England which had a copper plug in the centre of the coin.

 

 

 

 

tin farthing.jpg

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1685 if i'm not mistaken, they were the tin ones i mentioned which to appease the pyx trial included the copper plug in the centre as the previous charles farthings had been copper, and they objected to tin being the chosen metal for this farthing.

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1685 if i'm not mistaken, they were the tin ones i mentioned which to appease the pyx trial included the copper plug in the centre as the previous charles farthings had been copper, and they objected to tin being the chosen metal for this farthing.

 

Close it was 1684 (I used to have one about 5 years ago), everything else was spot on. Although they had a secondary argument for the copper plug, it was also there to make counterfeiting more difficult.

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During the reign of Charles I of England, a new series of royal farthing tokens was issued. These coins were made from a rod of copper with a wedge of brass that had been hammered into a groove that had been cut into the rod. Blanks were then sliced off the rod and the farthings struck from these blanks. As these pieces had a rose on the reverse (instead of a harp that had appeared on all the earlier issues of royal farthing tokens) they are usually referred to as rose farthing tokens. They were issued from 1636 until 1644 (when they were discontinued during the civil war). Thus these were bimetallic coins of copper with a brass wedge. from http://www.fleur-de-coin.com/articles/bi-metallic.asp

 

In 1634 another farthing patent was issued, to Lord Maltravers, Henry Howard, and Sir Francis Crane, their issues being known as Maltravers. During this time there were vast numbers of forged farthings in circulation and the situation became unacceptable as the poor felt conned and unfairly treated by the authorities. Consequently, Lord Maltravers was asked to introduce a new style denomination which came to be called the Rose farthing -- it was much smaller and thicker than the Maltravers, but the revolutionary development was the metal and construction of the coin; most of the coin was copper, but a small 'plug' of brass was inserted into part of the coin. This made the Rose farthing almost impossible to counterfeit, and the production of forgeries soon ended. from http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:y4eiUjR6ENAJ:www.wordiq.com/definition/English/British_coin_Farthing+English+Rose+Farthing&cd=3&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

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During the reign of Charles I of England, a new series of royal farthing tokens was issued. These coins were made from a rod of copper with a wedge of brass that had been hammered into a groove that had been cut into the rod. Blanks were then sliced off the rod and the farthings struck from these blanks. As these pieces had a rose on the reverse (instead of a harp that had appeared on all the earlier issues of royal farthing tokens) they are usually referred to as rose farthing tokens.

 

 

Ha... I'd forgotton all about that issue!

 

Touche.

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