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Translation From German Please!


alexbq2
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Here's a curious German or Austrian satiric medallion from the World War 1 period. It is reversible, and thus the 4 allies are depicted in an interesting way. I've noticed this medallion in a few auction amongst the Russian exonumia.

 

There is an inscription in German, which I am sure is quite whimsical (not sure that that's the right word to call it). I tried to feed the inscription into Google Translate, but the result was not at all clear. Perhaps somebody here can translate.

987040.jpg

987039.jpg

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Here's a curious German or Austrian satiric medallion from the World War 1 period. It is reversible, and thus the 4 allies are depicted in an interesting way. I've noticed this medallion in a few auction amongst the Russian exonumia.

 

There is an inscription in German, which I am sure is quite whimsical (not sure that that's the right word to call it). I tried to feed the inscription into Google Translate, but the result was not at all clear. Perhaps somebody here can translate.

987040.jpg

987039.jpg

Not hard to see why Google couldn't translate this! :D

The inscription in the picture on the left says:

"Frankreich aus Liebe teilt mit Russland die Hiebe" -- France shares the beating (i.e. from the Germans) with Russia out of affection

 

On the right:

"Belgiens Geschick -- englische Tück" -- Belgium's skill (or cunning) -- English malice (or treachery)

 

Both slogans rhyme (the German "ü" is often used to rhyme with "i" which is actually how it is pronounced in some regions, although there is usually a slight difference).

 

Looks like these were German propaganda medals. Other than that, I can't tell you anything about it, unfortunately.

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Not hard to see why Google couldn't translate this! :D

The inscription in the picture on the left says:

"Frankreich aus Liebe teilt mit Russland die Hiebe" -- France shares the beating (i.e. from the Germans) with Russia out of affection

 

On the right:

"Belgiens Geschick -- englische Tück" -- Belgium's skill (or cunning) -- English malice (or treachery)

 

Both slogans rhyme (the German "ü" is often used to rhyme with "i" which is actually how it is pronounced in some regions, although there is usually a slight difference).

 

Looks like these were German propaganda medals. Other than that, I can't tell you anything about it, unfortunately.

 

"Geschick" is a poetic (obsolete) form of "Schicksal" and means "fate" (in this case cruel fate).

Neutral Belgium was invaded in World War I by Germany. :(

The medal tries to explain this as a consequence of English intrigues.

Sigi

(native speaker of German)

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"Geschick" is a poetic (obsolete) form of "Schicksal" and means "fate" (in this case cruel fate).

Neutral Belgium was invaded in World War I by Germany. :(

The medal tries to explain this as a consequence of English intrigues.

Sigi

(native speaker of German)

Thanks, Sigi ... this makes much better sense! :art:

 

"Frankreich aus Liebe teilt mit Russland die Hiebe" -- France shares the beating (i.e. from the Germans) with Russia out of affection [love]

Isn't there some popular or traditional saying about sharing the beating out of love??? It seems familiar, but I can't remember how it goes.

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Thanks, Sigi ... this makes much better sense! :art:

 

 

Isn't there some popular or traditional saying about sharing the beating out of love??? It seems familiar, but I can't remember how it goes.

Hi Bob, could be from MAX UND MORITZ by Wilhelm Busch, popular at the time. Hit the link below. Sigi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_and_Moritz

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Hi Bob, could be from MAX UND MORITZ by Wilhelm Busch, popular at the time. Hit the link below. Sigi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_and_Moritz

Thanks for the interesting link! I looked through all 7 of the "Streiche" but couldn't find this particular phrase. Wonderful stuff, though...

 

"Nur aus Liebe setzt es Hiebe": This phrase was used by Joseph Haydn in one of his operas, but I couldn't find the name of the librettist. Probably something which was already in public domain at the time, kind of like the numerous rhymes of "Herz" with "Schmerz" (in a similar vein, no less! :D )

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