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99p coin could save millions for shoppers


Tiffibunny
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"A new 99p coin would be welcomed by many Brits who find the 99p pricing policy irritating and could save millions in discarded coppers."

 

My guess is that if such a coin would be introduced, store holders would change the prices to x.98, to stay one penny below the "magic border".

 

Overhere in the Netherlands, many items are priced x.98 or x.99.

 

I'm not sure, but I would not be surprised if in Finland, many items are priced x.95, since all prices are rounded to 5 or 0 there.

 

It's all psychology: stay the smallest amount under a "magic" border, so potential customer have the feeling it's cheaper.

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Here you usually pay more than .99 for an item marked .99 because of sales tax.

 

 

Some states, I think Oregon USA have no sales tax, others, like California have 8.25% in some counties. I think New York is higher yet.

 

In Canada PST(Provincial) and GST(Federal) sales taxes can go as high as 17.5%, even on some food items, you know the essentials like junque food.

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USSR never had a tax on anything, remember the Govt planned the economy and printed the money when it needed it, so no need for a tax. But in 1990-91 sales taxes were introduced and were a complete pain in the &$$ because nobody had registers that figured it out, or knew how to collect etc, it actually was a confusing situation. I paid taxes sometimes, other times the person selling didn't bother, why bother, when government guarantees you a job?

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Here you usually pay more than .99 for an item marked .99 because of sales tax.

Well, in the EU you usually pay the price that you see on the label or shelf (which includes the sales tax) - but how many customers go into a store and buy exactly one "x.99" item? So we would also need an 1.98 coin for two items, and a 2.97 piece, oh and what if an item is priced x.98? :ninja:

 

Christian

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Well, in the EU you usually pay the price that you see on the label or shelf (which includes the sales tax) - but how many customers go into a store and buy exactly one "x.99" item? So we would also need an 1.98 coin for two items, and a 2.97 piece, oh and what if an item is priced x.98?  :ninja:

 

Christian

 

 

What is the tax in Germany? I remember in Denmark it was 25%, in France 18%

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Currently 16% (regular rate); the reduced rate which applies to vital items such as food and most coins :ninja: is 7%. But we will have federal elections next month, and there has been some talk about possibly increasing the regular rate, and/or applying the reduced rate to fewer product/service types. In France, for example, the regular TVA rate went up to about 20 percent not too long ago.

 

(By the way, we also pay the sales tax of the seller's country of origin. Which means that, if I buy a coin from the Monnaie de Paris, I pay about 20% sales tax - if I bought the coin from a German dealer, the tax would be 7% ...)

 

Christian

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Currently 16% (regular rate); the reduced rate which applies to vital items such as food and most coins :ninja: is 7%. But we will have federal elections next month, and there has been some talk about possibly increasing the regular rate, and/or applying the reduced rate to fewer product/service types. In France, for example, the regular TVA rate went up to about 20 percent not too long ago.

 

(By the way, we also pay the sales tax of the seller's country of origin. Which means that, if I buy a coin from the Monnaie de Paris, I pay about 20% sales tax - if I bought the coin from a German dealer, the tax would be 7% ...)

 

Christian

 

 

I have bought coins from MdP, and paid the bleeping tax, and intended to get a form for recompense since I took them out of the EU, but lost the forms on the way out and forgot about it.

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I wish they would make a 9/10 of a cent coin so I could buy exactly one gallon of gas and pay the advertised price. :ninja:

 

I know that at least one gas station in my area where the convenience items (ie. chocolate bars) are priced at say 79c, but registers at the till as .799, so they're actually charging you 80c. I doubt it's legal though, and since people don't usually request or look at receipts, they get away with it.

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