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thedeadpoint
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A now odd denomination that made sense when it was issued:

 

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Beautiful. I was hoping I could post a quarter eagle too but I only have half and eagle.

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1802 15 Soldi / 8 ½ Kreuzer, Goriza.

 

My favorite oddity. It is minted in two different values because the location of the mint straddled two different monetary systems within the Austro-Hungarian Empire. :)

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My favorite oddity. It is minted in two different values because the location of the mint straddled two different monetary systems within the Austro-Hungarian Empire. :)

 

Fascinating. I figured that was the case when I saw the two denominations. I wonder what sort of diplomacy it took to get those issued/accepted. Know of any other coins like this?

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You would think that by now our government would have authorized the issuing of coins and currency in the amounts that are really used everywhere. $0.99, $1.99, $2.99, etc. Just how often do you see anything for the exact amount in what we now have. Even when you get into the really high amounts they use things like $2,945.98 for something.

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The Soviet array of coinage was weird -- 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50-kopek pieces. A lot of other countries had the same denominations, though not many I can think of had all at the same time.

 

But I can't think of any that had a 15-unit denomination, at least not in modern times.

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53 Shillings 4 Pence or 4 Merks

You know, as soon as I converted that to pence, the valuation (and the unit of a 'merk') suddenly made perfect sense... either that or I spend too much time with computers. :D

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The Soviet array of coinage was weird -- 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50-kopek pieces. A lot of other countries had the same denominations, though not many I can think of had all at the same time.

 

But I can't think of any that had a 15-unit denomination, at least not in modern times.

 

 

If you ever used them, and as sparing as change was in USSR, they did make sense. All the denominations were easy to find except 2 kopeks - because it was price of a phone call from phone booth. 50 Kopek coins were not common until the 1980's though. I never spent 2 kopek coins except for phone calls.

 

USA had 15 denomination small change bill:

 

fr126715c.jpg

 

Which makes sense when it was issued because it paid for five 1st class postage stamps.

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If you ever used them, and as sparing as change was in USSR, they did make sense. All the denominations were easy to find except 2 kopeks - because it was price of a phone call from phone booth. 50 Kopek coins were not common until the 1980's though. I never spent 2 kopek coins except for phone calls.

 

The 5 kopeks are hard to find here, even when the foreigns bin at my LCS is loaded with Soviet-era loose change. Rarely anything over the 15, though. A few 20s, that's about it. Been lucky with a few finds from the late 1930s and early 1940s, though.

 

USA had 15 denomination small change bill:

 

Which makes sense when it was issued because it paid for five 1st class postage stamps.

That's all kinds of cool. Please do not turn me on to a whole new sort of collecting. :hysterical:

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1802 15 Soldi / 8 ½ Kreuzer, Goriza.

My favorite oddity. It is minted in two different values because the location of the mint straddled two different monetary systems within the Austro-Hungarian Empire. :)

 

The coin says "Ein Halber Siebenzehner" literally "A Half Seventeener" thus your 8½ Kreuzer.

Just a point: there was no "Austro-Hungarian" until 1867. After losing the Six Weeks' War in 1866, Austria was obliged to shore up the homefront with concessions to the Hungarians.

 

You know, as soon as I converted that to pence, the valuation (and the unit of a 'merk') suddenly made perfect sense... either that or I spend too much time with computers. :D

 

280 hexidecimal pence is not a nice round number but 1200 octal pence is.

 

Sorry, cannot show the picture. (I don't know what else to clear out to free up my quota.)

Hanover 1846. "12 Einer Thaler" is not unusual but "CLXVIII Eine Feine Mark" is. That's 168 to the mark. These coins were 2.67 grams 0.521 fine for an ASW of 0.0447grams. So 168 of them would be a mark of 7 1/2 ounces, a bit light for a medieval mark, but their Thaler at 12 of these would be only 0.5364 ounces, smaller even than a Canadian Dollar. And for the Details: Obv: "Ernst August Koenig v. Hanover" B=mintmaster Ludwig August Bruel. (KM 194.2 is Craig #66B)

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I get the 42 but I don't get the "solaris"

I think he just picked "solaris" because it sounded cool; if there's any deeper meaning than that, I don't know it.

 

I was lucky to get this particular serial number, I think. 37 was the number 42 was chosen over by Douglas Adams, having somehow determined that these were the two funniest numbers, and that 42 was slightly funnier.

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