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I don't think this is accurate....


nicholasz219
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I was looking through ebay tonight and saw this listing.

 

eBay link (corrected)

 

I see normal wear on both sides and pitting on the obverse. On the reverse, above the tail of St. George's horse, I see some shadowy marks that may be part of a strike, but I can not be certain.

 

I am not that familiar with the overstuck coinages and am looking for some advice on how to properly identify these pieces and what the price range should be.

 

Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Nicholasz219

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I see normal wear on both sides

 

Its description is accurate and it is from "Cloud" kopek :)

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Its description is accurate and it is from "Cloud" kopek :)

 

I probably should have prefaced this with, "I guess I do not know what I should be looking for in order to determine what is a legitimate overstrike." I am completely new to the series type and would like to learn more about these coins.

 

Thanks for the clarification gentlemen. I was not trying to disparage the listing. It just symbolized what I have difficulty understanding.

 

Thanks,

 

nicholasz219

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The key to understanding overstrikes is to see a lot of examples, own a few, look at it till you get so sick of it. What is different from a normal coin opposed to an overstruck coin is that with an overstruck coin, what is supposed to be plain field has "unusual patterns" behind it.

 

For example this:

 

911549.jpg

 

You can see that it was an 1728 kopek originally:

 

903395.jpg

 

How did I determine it? The massive cross sign and the letter "moscow".

 

Since all coins are struck with different pressures, angles, location of how the original coin was put in, all overstruck coins are virtually unique. This also means that the price varies to a huge magnitude, it's nearly impossible to quote any figure. I can give you a rough example -

 

For example

1763-1767 5,2,1 kopek overstruck 1762 10,5,2 kopek 20+

1762 10,4,2 kopek overstruck previous 1757-1762 series, a few hundred, closer to thousand in decent condition

1757-1762 2 kopek overstruck 1755-57 baroque kopek 20

1757-1762 2 kopek overstruck 1755-57 baroque kopek over 1724-1730 5 kopek 50+

1757-1761 kopek overstruck Swedish ore, 150+++

1730-1735 denga overstruck over Paul I kopek 10-20

1730-1735 denga overstruck over 1724 kopek 100+

This is of course a short list of all possible combination. Search my topics of overstruck coins and you might find something interesting. Price is all off my head so I can be totally off.

 

All this price is based upon how much details are left and may not have a clear date. If it shows a clear date and even includes the mintmark (where exists), the price goes up higher. You can have a case of two different overstrikes like this:

 

903396.jpg

 

There is supposedly one that has been through three overstrikes. Now that's insane. Of course, if you have a case of two or more different mintmarks or coins of non-Russian origin, this dramatically increase the price.

 

Note, this does not mean that you should hoard all the 1730-1735 denga coins and expect all of them to be overstruck. No, it's not that straightforward as it is. Coins were only overstruck when there was not enough planchets hence you should not expect every single one of them to be so.

 

Good thing is, overstruck coins can be obtained cheaply since not all ebay sellers can be bothered to identify their coins. Some are obvious, some are tough which can make you quite delusional. Trust me, that's how I obtained some of my tougher overstruck coins. Feel free to check my omnicoin collection - there's a lot to go through but I'm sure there's something that interests you.

 

Hope that helped.

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Gx and Scott,

 

Thank you so much for your help, especially the pictures. It makes a huge difference when you can see the coin, but have an understanding of what you are looking for while looking at it. So basically, from what I've read above, the way to look at these is to look for the understruck coin's details and the one above it. The more details visible on each makes for a rarer and more expensive coin. I have gotten a better understanding of what I am looking for now. I will continue to read more of the posts and check out the omnicoin pics. These are the sort of articles that really help me, because I have not been exposed to these sort of articles and information before. I really appreciate the help that all of you have offered. Im interested in learning everything I can, so please keep the responses coming.

 

nicholasz219

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For future reference, I can not read Russian.... I think I might end up taking a course though. At least then I could finally access 90 percent of the literature on Russian coins.

 

nicholasz219

 

 

And as for the translation....I would seriously like to debate the word "readable" with you.....hahahaha. That gave me a headache and I still only vaguely understand that they were speaking about an overstruck coin with a weight of a Catherine 10 rubles. But I appreciate the effort.

 

nicholasz219

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